Mulhouse Music Festival: August 21 -25

PROGRAMME FESTIVAL MÉTÉO 2018
LE PROGRAMME COMPLET EST EN LIGNE || FULL PROGRAM IS ONLINE

MARDI 21 AOÛT 2018
* PÜK (Vincent Posty, Cécile Thévenot, Benoit Kilian)
* KEITH TIPPETT SOLO
* DAVID MURRAY “INFINITY 4TET” feat. SAUL WILLIAMS (David Murray, Saul Williams, Jaribu Shahid, Orrin Evans, Nasheet Waits)

MERCREDI 22 AOÛT 2018
* PETER EVANS SOLO
* STREIFENJUNKO (Eivind Lønning, Espen Reinertsen)
* JEAN-PHILIPPE GROSS & AXEL DÖRNER
* MICHIYO YAGI SOLO
* AHMED (Pat Thomas, Joel Grip, Seymour Wright, Antonin Gerbal)
* NIMMERSATT feat. JON ROSE (Daan Vandewalle, Chris Cutler, John Greaves, Jon Rose)

JEUDI 23 AOÛT 2018
* PASCAL NIGGENKEMPER SOLO
* SOFIA JERNBERG & METTE RASMUSSEN
* NICOLE MITCHELL SOLO
* SYSTÈME FRICHE II “LE CHANT DES PISTES” (Xavier Charles, Jacques Di Donato, Félicie Bazelaire, Jean-Luc Cappozzo, Benjamin Duboc, Isabelle Duthoit, eRikm, Franz Hautzinger, Simon Henocq, Soizic Lebrat, Bruno Maurice, Roméro Monteiro, Nicolas Nageotte, Alfred Spirli, Thierry Waziniack)
* MICHIYO YAGI & TONY BUCK
* SENYAWA (Rully Shabara, Wukir Suryadi)

VENDREDI 24 AOÛT 2018
* JON ROSE SOLO
* WOLFGANG MITTERER “GRAND JEU 2” (for organ and electronics)
* SPLITTER ORCHESTER & JEAN-LUC GUIONNET “VOLLBILD” (Jean-Luc Guionnet, Liz Allbee, Boris Baltschun, Burkhard Beins, Anthea Caddy, Axel Dörner, Kai Fagaschinski, Robin Hayward, Steve Heather, Anat Cohavi, Mario de Vega, Chris Heenan, Magda Mayas, Mike Majkowski, Matthias Müller, Andrea Neumann, Morten J. Olsen, Simon J. Phillips, Julia Reidy, Ignaz Schick, Michael Thieke, Clayton Thomas, Sabine Vogel, Biliana Voutchkova, Marta Zapparoli)
* CHARLES HAYWARD & TONY BUCK
* A PRIDE OF LIONS (Daunik Lazro, Joe McPhee, Guillaume Séguron, Joshua Abrams, Chad Taylor)
* SONS OF KEMET (Shabaka Hutchings, Theon Cross, Eddie Hick, Tom Skinner)

SAMEDI 25 AOÛT 2018
* ROBIN HAYWARD & JEAN-LUC GUIONNET
* GROUPE D’IMPROVISATION DU CONSERVATOIRE DE MULHOUSE (Samuel Colard, Célestine Asselin, Gauthier Legris, Alexandre Cahen, Laure Fischer, Théo Zimmermann)
* SPLITTER ORCHESTER (Liz Allbee, Boris Baltschun, Burkhard Beins, Anthea Caddy, Axel Dörner, Kai Fagaschinski, Robin Hayward, Steve Heather, Anat Cohavi, Mario de Vega, Chris Heenan, Magda Mayas, Mike Majkowski, Matthias Müller, Andrea Neumann, Morten J. Olsen, Simon J. Phillips, Julia Reidy, Ignaz Schick, Michael Thieke, Clayton Thomas, Sabine Vogel, Biliana Voutchkova, Marta Zapparoli)
* PETER EVANS ENSEMBLE (Peter Evans, Mazz Swift, Tom Blancarte, Sam Pluta, Jim Black)
* THIS IS NOT THIS HEAT (Charles Hayward, Charles Bullen, Frank Byng, Daniel O’Sullivan, Alex Ward, James Sedwards)

Découvrez le programme complet : WWW.FESTIVAL-METEO.FR

Check the full program : WWW.FESTIVAL-METEO.FR

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Musiques & Recherches Festival

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Festival 2 Faces of Electroacoustic Musics

L’Espace Senghor
Ch. de Wavre, 366
B – 1040 Bruxelles

Wednesday, March 28 at 8 pm: Musiques & Recherches:

Musiques & Recherches invites the German trio Surberg / Berweck / Lorenz to re-create the work of Bernard Parmegiani’s Stries using their analog synths, accompanied by Annette Vande Gorne who will spatialize the “band” parts on the acousmonium.

In the second part of the evening,  the same performers will perform their version of Paraboles-Mix by Henri Pousseur.

Thursday, March 29 at 8 pm : Concert du Centre Henri Pousseur : Computer music and live electronics

Ensemble Sillages : Jean-Marc Fessard (clarinettes), Nicolas Miribel (violon), Vincent Leterme (piano), Hélène Colombotti (percussion)

Luc Brewaeys, Ni Fleurs ni couronnes, Monument pour Jonathan Harvey pour violon et électronique (2013)

Martin Matalon, Traces XIII pour piano et électronique (création belge) (2018)

Gonzalo Bustos, Temps de terre pour cajón et électronique (2017) (création belge)

Jean-Luc Hervé, #3 les sons tournent pour clarinette contrebasse et dispositif acousmatique (2018) (création belge)

Pierre Jodlowsky, Is it this ? pour violon, clarinette basse, percussion et dispositif audiovisuel (2001)

For more information musiques-recherches

AngelicA 28 Festival Internazionale di Musica

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The Angelica Festival is celebrating its 28th year with AngelicA 28 Festival Internazionale di Musica in Bologna, Modena (Italy)

May 3>5 + 9 + 13 + 16>19 + 24>27 2018

 

The festival lineup currently includes:
John King GUITORGANUM,
Eric Chenaux SLOWLY PARADISE,
Skadedyr CULTUREN ,
David Behrman HEADY STRING WINDS,
Giorgio Nottoli IL SOFFIO-IL BATTITO-L’ELETTRICO POLICROMO,
Alvin Curran A BANDA LARGA sinfonia di strada,
SETOLADIMAIALE UNIT & Evan Parker
Dharma, HIS HUBRIS, SA ,
TRIO Kimmig-Studer-Zimmerlin & John Butcher,
Gavin Bryars Italian Ensemble & Ensemble Korymbos STRINGS, GUITARS & VOICES,
Orchestra del Teatro Comunale di Bologna,
Piccolo Coro Angelico,
LIBERARE LA VOCE,
Mike Patton FORGOTTEN SONGS (Mike Patton, Uri Caine),
Anthony Braxton & Jacqueline Kerrod, …

For more information visit: AngelicA

Other Minds Festival 23

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Other Minds presents it’s 23rd Festival of new music. Sound poets from around the globe gather in San Francisco for the 23rd edition of the Other Minds Festival. This year, we’ll have an all-star cast of composers and writers whose purview is that hippodrome of hilarity where literature and speech intersect music and performance.

The event takes place April 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14, 2018, at the ODC Theater, 3153 17th Street at Shotwell, in San Francisco.

Featured artists include an all-star cast, including Anne Waldman, Clark Coolidge & Alvin Curran, Michael McClure, Aram Saroyan, Enzo Minarelli, Jaap Blonk, Pamela Z, Amy X Neuburg, Charles Amirkhanian & Carol Law, Beth Anderson, and more. We’ll also bring you historical glimpses into the past of sound poetry by Marinetti, Depero, Hugo Ball, Stein, Toch, Heidsieck, Kurt Schwitters and many more.

For more information visit: other minds

AMN Reviews: Matteo Liberatore – “Solos” [Innova 985]

“Solos” is the first solo guitar album from guitarist Matteo Liberatore. It was mixed and mastered by guitarist-composer Elliot Sharp. The recording contains twelve pieces that explore the sonic possibilities of the solo acoustic guitar without electronics or any overdubs. Instead Liberatore employs extended techniques that includes the use of objects like metal springs, alligator clips, a bass bow and a kick drum beater. This is not just sonic novelty or gratuitous use of extended techniques; each of the pieces while largely improvised, have clarity and purpose that creates really interesting and memorable pieces of music.

The first track “Agnes” builds a texture somewhere between a hammer dulcimer and the tremolos of the classical guitar, but with very modern harmonies.

“Untitled #9” is a stark exploration of counterpoint with the contrasting colors of the prepared guitar.

“Barrea” is a striking piece that on a blind listen I doubt that most listeners could correctly identify the source instrument. It is a lyrical noise piece with extensive bowing that sounds like its coming from a cello or two.

Then there is “Causeway” which is a haunting but a somewhat more “conventional” piece that explores a “folky” melodic theme that slowly transforms with each pass.

Matteo Liberatore’s “Solos” is a wonderful record that introduces us to an interesting new voice in the world of experimental guitar. Liberatore’s music is very imaginative.  “Solos” explores textures driven by propulsive rhythms, stark counterpoint of contrasting colors, and lyrical noise, sometimes all in the same piece. Highly Recommended!

Chris DeChiara

For more information – https://www.innova.mu/albums/matteo-liberatore/solos

AMN Reviews: Ensemble Resonanz, Elliott Sharp, Gareth Davis – “Oceanus Procellarum” [Cavity Search CSR101]

OP_CoverElliott Sharp has been a key figure in New York City’s experimental music scene for more than thirty years. He is a musician of incredible range with significant works spanning free improvisation, blues, jazz, electronic, noise, chamber, and orchestral music. Sharp’s work has been inspired by his deep interest in science and mathematics. He has developed a unique musical syntax that is informed by fractal geometry, chaos theory, algorithmic and biological processes. On “Oceanus Procellarum” Elliott Sharp teams up with Gareth Davis and the Ensemble Resonanz.

The Ensemble Resonanz is an unusual chamber orchestra based in Saint Pauli, Hamburg. The ensemble is democratically organized and makes its home at the resonanzraum – a concert space built inside of an old bunker. The resonanzraum is both unique and informal with more of a club atmosphere than that of the traditional concert hall.  The Ensemble Resonanz regularly performs monthly programs at the resonanzraum that aim to bridge the musical past with the present.

Gareth Davis is a clarinetist that primarily performs on the bass and contrabass clarinets. Like Sharp, he is a musician of incredible range and interests. Davis’s work spans the worlds of contemporary classical, to free improvisation, to rock, noise and electronica. Davis has a wonderful sound and incredible technical command of the bass clarinet. He has premiered works by Jonathan Harvey, Bernhard Lang, Peter Ablinger and Toshio Hosokawa. Davis has performed and collaborated with JACK Quartet, monster cellist Frances Marie Uitti, Merzbow and Christian Marclay.

Elliott Sharp’s “Oceanus Procellarum” is a work filled with propulsive development that is rich in rhythmic and timbral complexity. “Oceanus Procellarum” was recorded live at its UK premiere during the 2016 Huddersfield Festival. This performance was beautifully recorded and has a sound that is much larger than the chamber ensemble of twelve strings plus the two soloists. “Oceanus Procellarum” which translates to Ocean of Storms is a thirty-eight minute through composed piece in five sections with each section consisting of multiple episodes.  Sharp constructed the piece to be a kind of intersection between two moving fronts somewhat like a concerto in that it pits the two soloists – Elliott Sharp on electro-acoustic guitar and Gareth Davis on bass clarinet against the strings of the Ensemble Resonanz. The piece creates a sound world where textures build, form and transform in a kind of attraction and repulsion as the two moving fronts move into and out from each other. The composition has a raw intensity with many dramatic shifts where events can suddenly move from very intense large sound bodies to moments of reflection only to suddenly be challenged by the arrival of another moving front.

Since improvisation is at the heart of Elliott Sharp’s work it is likely that some elements of improvisation or performer choice are part of this score and this enables the soloists – Sharp and Davis, who are outstanding, to create an atmosphere of spontaneity throughout the performance. The strings are called upon to use many extended techniques including “alternate bows” constructed from various metal springs and wooden sticks. Despite what must be a challenging score to perform, the Ensemble Resonanz really brings this music to life. The timbral range produced by the entire ensemble and soloists is stunning. They effortlessly move from chaotic clouds to throbbing masses of growing clusters to ethereal almost ambient reflections to sparkling and brassy counterpoint to intense primal rhythmic unisons and eventually they end in a bed of very soft bowed white noise.

“Oceanus Procellarum” is an exciting listen. Old hands will really enjoy it and newcomers will find it a great place to start as it is absolutely one of Elliott Sharp’s best chamber works.  Highly Recommended!

Chris De Chiara

AMN Reviews: John Corbett – “Vinyl Freak: Love Letters to a Dying Medium” [ Duke University Press – isbn:9780822363507 ]

978-0-8223-6366-8_prFreaks are those of us that harmlessly indulge our interests to the point of compulsion or obsession. When it comes to music, the most interesting people that I have met have been those that exuberantly talk about music almost to the point of proselytizing. As they talk about either their collections or their discoveries or a recent concert or a new release or a particular instrument, they invite us to share in their enthusiasm and in the process they turn us on to all kinds of great music that we may have been completely unaware of. While many of these people can be found on blogs, or in chat rooms, on mailing lists and in forums, a select few have managed to turn their obsessions into a career. Luckily for us John Corbett is that kind of freak.

When it comes to the outer limits of jazz and the realms of creative music and free improvisation, Corbett writes with unmatched exuberance and passion supported by his deep and wide knowledge of the music. In “Vinyl Freak: Love Letters to a Dying Medium” John Corbett explores the mindset of record collecting and the rising popularity of vinyl records. He combines bits of memoir and criticism to explain what he and other collectors find so special about vinyl. The book contains seven new essays and the entire twelve years of the “Vinyl Freak” column that Corbett wrote for DownBeat magazine. Each “Vinyl Freak” column consisted of a one page essay/review of a rare primarily jazz record and are reprinted in their entirety, plus updated notes on reissue status. What was really interesting about the “Vinyl Freak” columns were the tangents that Corbett might take in describing the record, its music, the musicians, cover, style, etc. This would often reveal interesting external connections between the music, its makers and its history, and in the process expose us to related albums and musicians. Among the new essays is a chapter of vignettes on one hundred thirteen of his favorite rare free improvisation and creative music recordings. There is also one riveting essay that focuses on the tale of his uncovering of a cache of extremely rare Sun Ra items.

While many will view this book as just being about Corbett’s obsessive and unique view of record collecting and the recent vinyl resurgence, and that is definitely in this book, it’s really about how the format changes of recorded music impacts music history. There is so much great music that seems to have disappeared due to format changes. In writing about all of these rare records Corbett uncovers a lot of great and potentially forgotten music. John Corbett reminds us that as formats change we can lose great music. Think of the many records that you had in your vinyl collection that have yet to make it to CD or a digital download format. Well, consider that this has happened throughout the history of recorded music, as recordings moved from tapes and wires and cylinders and shellac to various forms, speeds and sizes of vinyl and then to various digital formats. Bottom line, we may have lost a lot of great music along the way and we would have lost even more great music, if it weren’t for collectors who turned their passion into the curating and production of reissues of old recordings in new formats. John Corbett has stepped up here as well with the many reissues he has been busy producing for his Corbett vs Dempsey label.

Clearly John Corbett is a vinyl freak. Who else would include a rare unreleased limited edition Sun Ra flex-disc in his latest book? He may truly love the vinyl medium but deep down he loves the music even more. Corbett really is an “equal opportunity ear filler” and is willing to acquire the music he really enjoys in any format. With “Vinyl Freak: Love Letters to a Dying Medium” John Corbett invites us to join him in the pleasure of discovering new sounds to indulge our ears. So what are you waiting for? You’ve been invited. Highly Recommended!

Chris De Chiara

For more information: https://www.dukeupress.edu/vinyl-freak

Additional reviews of John Corbett’s books on AMN: