AMN Reviews: Chvad SB – Phenomenalism Cartesian Doubt and Bomb #20 [Silber Media]

a1207993938_16Some of the systems art of the late 1960s and early 1970s—for example, Sol LeWitt’s modular lattice sculptures or Mel Bochner’s number grids—embodied a certain regularity of form. A systematic regularity, one might say. A basic element might be repeated at constant intervals or an input sequence subjected to a defined operation. By contrast, some other systemic artworks—integral serialist compositions, for example–produced surfaces of unpredictable, irregularly occurring events from an underlying set of rules. In either case the systems generating the artworks featured a certain autonomy requiring little or no ongoing oversight from the artist. Chvad SB’s Phenomenalism Cartesian Doubt and Bomb #20, a long piece for modular synthesizer, leverages carefully crafted feedback loops into a soundwork that essentially plays itself.

With its collection of fragmentary musical gestures, Phenomenalism sounds something like the pointillist serial works of the mid-20th century—it’s possible to hear in it a refigured echo of Milton Babbitt’s compositions for the RCA Mark II synthesizer of the early 1960s, for example. Like those compositions, Phenomenalism aggregates individual pitch sequences and timbres into a kaleidoscopic sound of playful unpredictability. Also like those compositions, the pleasure of the surface sounds requires no knowledge of the systems underlying them.

https://silbermedia.bandcamp.com

Daniel Barbiero

AMN Reviews: Llarks – 5 x 5 [silber179]; Parties – Tea Time [silber182]; X-Bax – Aokigahara [silber183] Kirchenkampf – The Body Electric [silber184]

Whether or not it’s the soul of wit, brevity does often compel an artist to pare down to essentials. Thus it is with these four new releases from Silber Records’ 5 in 5 series of EPs, each of which contains five tracks totaling five minutes. As it happens, the twenty tracks collectively represent twenty different ways to set one minute in sound.

The five pieces on The Body Electric by Kirchenkampf (electronic musician John Gore) manage to cover a rolling terrain in five short strides. From the foreboding electronic wash of the opening EEG through the closing Galvani, which brings to mind a shortwave receiver tuned between stations, Gore develops a musical rhetoric of metallic timbres rooted in pulse and periodicity that undulates at variable speeds. Llarks’ 5 x 5 is Chris Jeely’s treated guitar framed by abstract sounds. Each track is built around a kind of skeleton chord progression sketched out as an arpeggio, cadence or elliptical cycle. Parties—P D Wilder, Joe Morgan and Andrew Weathers—likewise create effects-laden, guitar-centered music layered over pedal points or percolating synths. The Japanese cinema-inspired Aokigahara by X-Bax (Phil Dole) is, despite the grim implications of its underlying concept, composed of mostly melodic miniatures for guitar with a dose of heavy rock and gritty drone on the final two cuts.

http://www.silbermedia.com

AMN Reviews: Clara de Asís – Nununu [PyR 141] & Caroline Park – Less than Human [PyR 142]

Two new offerings from the Pan y Rosas netlabel present different perspectives on making electronic music. One involves intuitive, moment-to-moment decision making, while the other draws inspiration from a systems-based aesthetic of autonomous processes.

NUNUNU_artwork_ANununu is Marseille-based experimental guitarist Clara de Asís’s twenty-four minute, unedited single-take improvisation for prepared electric guitar. A continuously evolving soundscape, the piece begins with a low-key electronic hum or murmur that at times sounds like the rush of wind through telephone wires or the throbbing of airplane propellers high overhead. From there de Asís builds reverberant sound blocks into a thickness of layered echoes which eventually converge into a buzz and an unsettling, suspended chord punctuated by the metallic chiming of struck strings.

CP_LTH_cover-artCaroline Park, whose 2013 release Rim explored the sonic products of generative compositional processes, here presents five pieces that begin with minimal musical materials which accumulate into larger structures through repetition, superimposition and variation. In Being States Park creates changing harmonic patterns by layering a handful of brief motifs of a few notes each; the larger melodic aggregates that result take on unpredictable shapes by virtue of the differing lengths and cycles of the constituent motifs. Plantlife and A Moth Is Born are made up of somewhat harsher sounds, the former sending its elongated tones riding out on a wave of static and the latter consisting of siren-like, dissonant glissandi. Fractured Barnacles is constructed around a pulsing sequence of changeable speed, while Gldufgsld closes the collection with a floating, consonant chord.

http://www.panyrosasdiscos.net/

AMN Reviews: Spectrical – Emergent Forms [cnv79]

cnv79The air is full of electromagnetic signals undetectable to the naked ear. With the proper equipment this ordinarily unheard soundworld can be made audible, recorded and cultivated into musical objects. For Emergent Forms, Australian sound experimentalist Timothy Allen used a JrF induction coil pickup to record signals from a variety of everyday sources—household appliances and fixtures, computers, and the like. The recordings were then arranged and processed in order to allow their latent pitches and harmonics to emerge. And in this hour-long single track of mutating textures and timbres one can hear a kind of elemental musicality asserting itself out of the raw sonic material of buzzes, crackles and humming drones. The piece is heavily textured–almost tangibly so, as much of the pitch aspect of the sound is fused into its timbres. These latter make for a thick weave of rough and burred and—somehow visual imagery comes to mind—shimmering, iridescent layers of sound. When pitches do emerge they tend to move slowly, singly or in vertical stacks; the harmonies are often static and suspended, though occasionally resolving. Allen’s extracted sounds can be heard mimicking the voices of a pipe organ, tubular bells, or other pitched percussion. The signals’ periodicity is brought out in the variable rhythms of clicks, chirps and beat-frequencies that run throughout like a kind of subterranean sound stream. Evocative stuff from the ostensible silence that surrounds us.

http://www.con-v.org

AMN Reviews: Caroline Park – RIM

Caroline Park: RIM [vuzh 047]

Caroline Park’s RIM, a new EP released on the Vuzh netlabel, presents two works exemplifying a generative or systems approach to sound art. Both pieces take minimal initial input material and subject it to controlled or semi-controlled processes, the result of which is a complex output.

The first track, we can be what they are doing, feeds in a brief sample of a viola to a layered system of delays. The output is an overlap of sounds varying in length and tonal complexity, which in turn are fed back into the system for further processing and reprocessing. The reiteration of these more or less fixed processes gives way to semi-chaotic results. The second track, Live at Studio Soto, takes several pitch sets generated by sine wave oscillators and runs them through structured combinatorial operations. In both tracks the layering of transformative processes creates a rich, shimmering weave of converging and diverging harmonies, pitch shifts and variable dynamics, the cumulative aural pattern of which is highly convoluted. Yet there are moments of transparency when the source material is laid bare.

Although both pieces’ compositional focus is on process this isn’t to the detriment of the end results, which are pleasing in their own right. Park’s iterative structures are designed to generate relationships between specifically audible elements, and in the end it is precisely the sound that remains with us. Thus RIM shows that a systems aesthetic can be sensually appealing as well as conceptually compelling.

http://www.vuzhmusic.com/

Musique Machine Reviews

From Musique Machine:

Drevne Bolesti – Self Titled
Drevne Bolesti is a HNW project that brings together Norwegian Andreas Brandal (Flesh Coffin, Hour of the Wolf, etc) & Sarajevo based Sebastian Crnich (Smrznik, Ïîòåðÿííàÿ Ãîðëà ). This self titled is the projects first release & it offers up one long 40 minute track entitled ’Ancient Diseases’ which is a thick & weather beaten wall of crunch & batter.

Mortuor – I’m Waiting For You…
´I´m Waiting For you…´ is a psychotic ranted slice of nasty sounding death industrial & slowed murderous Power electronics rants that very much bring to mind a more focus, less wondering & song biased take on Atrax Morgue.

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Sound-Minds Fortress, Travis Johns, Scott Stobbe in Portland

From Portland Eye and Ear Control:

Thursday, November 19th
8pm, $5 suggested donation (no one turned away)
@ Enterbeing
1603 NE alberta

Featuring:
Sound-Minds Fortress: Strings and Harmonium (members include Warren Lee, Mary Sutton, and Gabriel Will)
Travis Johns: Electronics from San Fran!
Scott Stobbe and Ensemble: New works for ensemble by Scott Stobbe incorporating inspiration and field recordings from his recent travels in Europe.

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