AMN Reviews: Bobby Naughton – The Haunt [No Business Records NBCD 105]

For a period of about a decade—from, roughly, the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s—New Haven, Connecticut was home to an exciting creative music community. Some of the principal figures were homegrown, some were from elsewhere, but the meeting of talent produced a cross-fertilization of ideas that resulted in excellent music, some of which was documented and some of which was not. Fortunately, the music on The Haunt, the 1976 recording led by Bobby Naughton, was not only recorded and issued in its time, but has been reissued by the fine No Business Records label as well.

Naughton, a largely self-taught vibraphonist and composer from Boston who lived and worked in New Haven during the 1970s, is joined on The Haunt by trumpeter Leo Smith (before he became Wadada Leo Smith). Smith, like Naughton, was a central figure in the New Haven creative music scene of the time; both worked closely together in small groups and as founders of the Creative Musicians Improvisors Forum, New Haven’s AACM-like artists’ collective. The third voice on the record is that of New York clarinetist Perry Robinson who, sadly, died at the end of last year.

Originally released on Otic, Naughton’s self-run label, the music still sounds astringently fresh and surprising over forty years later. A good part of the reason for this is the unusual instrumentation: clarinet, trumpet, and vibes are supplemented by no rhythm section for maintaining a pulse or even just a bass instrument to ground the harmonies. Consequently, the music tends to have a floating, harmonically open feel to it. The trio has been compared to a chamber ensemble, but even then it’s an extraordinary one. The vibes provide the frame, as would the piano in a chamber trio, but the other two instruments have a more complicated and unorthodox relationship, given the trumpet and clarinet’s similarities of compass and the peculiarities of their timbral interaction. At the upper end of their registers, they can be hard to distinguish; at the lower end, the two voices peel apart, the hollow warmth of the clarinet tempering the trumpet’s strident brassiness. Smith and Robinson both seem to intuit the implications of this dynamic and interlace their lines around each other in order to bring out the subtlest shadings of color; Naughton also is adept at altering the overall timbre of the music by using changes in register to converge on and diverge from the other two instruments. The title track, with its unisons, counterpoint and alternating leads from all three voices exemplifies the group’s painting with aural colors; a track like Ordette shows Naughton’s mastery at building textural variety with the deft arrangement of solo voices and ensemble passages; Slant demonstrates the timbral possibilities unlocked by harmonized melodies and the simultaneous play of independently improvised lines. The rapport among all three is extraordinary and given full opportunity to unfold within the unhurried tempos and open spaces of Naughton’s compositions.

http://nobusinessrecords.com/

The Sub Rosa Label Profiled

Source: Bandcamp Daily.

“We never wanted to create a record company,” says Guy-Marc Hinant. “I came to Brussels in the 1980s to study cinema. I met Fred Walheer and we started doing things together: publications, collages, performances. Then we had the idea to make records to link to a wider public…”

40 years later, Hinant and Walheer are still making records. Their collaborative project, Sub Rosa, is one of the most respected and influential labels specializing in avant-garde recordings, electronic experimentation, and anthropological field recordings. “The real question is why to release and to publish something rather than not doing it? What is the urgency of putting this out? For me, Sub Rosa is a perpetual flow,” Hinant says. “It’s very organic.”

Vital Weekly Reviews 1188

Source: Vital Weekly.

GREGORY TAYLOR – RETINUE (2CD by Palace Of Lights) *
ANDY BOLUS & ANLA COURTIS & SIGTRYGGUR BERG SIGMARSSON – SOBER MARIO BROS. (CD by Some) *
ALEXEI BORISOV & IRAKLI SANADITADZE – INTROSPECTION (CD, private) *
# IMPRO 5+1 (CD, private) *
FAKE CATS PROJECT – CLASSICS DOUBLE -BINDED (CDR, private) *
ARASHI – JIKAN (CD by PNL Records) *
TRIO IO – WAVES (CD by Bolt Records) *
THREE REPS – MINIMAL SURFACE (CD by Gold Bolus)
THOMAS CARNACKI – THE MUSEUM OF LOST SPECIES (LP by Alethiometer Records)
LE FORBICI DI MANITU & FRIENDS – ZONA MINATA (LP by A Simple Lunch) *
RESIDENTS – ESKIMO DECONSTRUCTED (2LP by Cherry Red)
SOUNDS OF OLYMPOU STREET (LP compilation by Topikap Records)
TERRITORIAL PISSINGS (LP compilation by Topikap Records)
FLORIAN WITTENBURG – DAILY DRONE DREAM (CDR by NurNichtNur) *
GHENT – THE HORIZON CIRCLES (cassette by Grain Of Sound)
ANIMAL MACHINE – TECHNOLOGICAL MURDER (3″CDR by Aaarrrg!)
VOMIR – UNTITLED FOR HARSH NOISE LONDON (3 ½ inch Floppy by Harsh Noise London)
VARIOUS ARTISTS – « 神经刺痛 » COMPILATION PRO TAPE (cassette by Autoproduzioni Records)
HARPOON – PERMISSION FIRST (cassette by Aphelion Editions) *
PATRICK SHIROISHI & ARTURO IBARRA – LA BLUES (cassette by Public Eyesore)

Avant Scena Reviews

Source: Avant Scena.

Stephen Gauci ​/ ​Adam Lane​ /​ Kevin Shea – “Studio Sessions, Vol​.​2” (gaucimusic recordings, 2019)

Georg Ruby – “Village Zone” (JHM (Jazz Haus Musik), 2019)

Gene Coleman & Raed Yassin – “The Adventures Of Nabil Fawzi” (Al Maslakh, 2019)

Stellari String Quartet ‎– “Vulcan” (Emanem, 2019)

Thomas Heberer / Terrence McManus / Michael Bates / Jeff Davis – “X Marks The Spot” (Out Now Recordings, 2019)

Graham Dunning & Edward Lucas – “End of a Cable” (tsss tapes, 2019)

Thurston Moore Group Boxed Set Coming at the End of Summer

Source: Paste.

The first CD, called Alice Moki Jayne, explores the noise guitar and honors female jazz greats Alice Coltrane, Moki Cherry and Jayne Cortez.

The boxset takes an orchestral turn with the second CD, Galaxies, in which a whopping 12 guitarists work as one instrument.

Last but not least, the final CD, 8 Spring Street, is Moore’s personal homage to avant-garde composer and guitarist Glenn Branca. The title of the CD is an address in New York City, the apartment where Moore first visited Branca, his mentor, to rehearse.

Karlheinz Stockhausen Aus Licht Performance Reviewed

Source: The New Yorker.

In the case of Stockhausen, though, only the colossal will suffice. “Aus licht” turned out to be the kind of inexplicable marvel that one waits half a lifetime to see. It induced shivers not just in its awesome moments—trumpeters intoning a chorale from balconies; brass players engaging in military-style skirmishes in the aisles; angel voices singing an extraterrestrial liturgy—but also in its unexpectedly intimate passages, its glimpses of the composer’s shattered childhood. “Aus licht” was one of the great theatrical events of the new century; it would have been even greater without the aerial extravagance.

Photos from the 24th Vision Festival 

Source: Jazztimes.

Drummer Andrew Cyrille reveled in a collaboration with German reedman Peter Brötzmann during the concluding set of a marathon four-hour, mostly improvisational concert for the opening night of New York City’s 24th annual Vision Festival.

On Tuesday, June 11, Cyrille, who curated the varied sets, received the Vision Festival’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Since the 1960s, Cyrille has been a key jazz innovator, helping to expand the musical improv tradition and foster compositional innovation.