Vital Weekly Reviews 1255

Source: Vital Weekly.

THOMAS DIMUZIO – BALANCE (3CD by Gench) *
THOMAS DIMUZIO – SLEW TEW (CDR by Gench) *
GABRIELE HASLER – HERDEN UND ANDERE BUESCHEL (CD by Laika Records)
DANIELLE BUONAIUTO – MARFA SONGS (CD by Starkland) *
COLLAGE PROJECT – OFF BRAND (CD by New Focus Recordings) *
JACOB WICK & BRAD HENKEL – LOVELY BAG YOU HAVE(CD by Relative Pitch Records)
THE BELLOWING EARWIGS – THE PERPENDICULAR GIRAFFE COMPARTMENT (CD by FMR Records) *
GOUVEA &NORTHOVER & MATTOS – CAJULA (CD by FMR Records) *
THE CHEMICAL EXPANSION LEAGUE – GRAPPLING WITH THE ORANGE PORPOISE (CD by Creative Sources Records) *
JEAN-JACQUES DUERINECKX/ADRIAN NORTHOVER – HEAROGLYPHICS (CD by Setola Di Maiale) *
KORDIK & LUCAS & PREVOST – HIGH LAVER REFLECTIONS (CD by Earshots/Matchless) *
AB INTRA – HENOSIS VI-XI (CD by Zoharum) *
NOR_POL – CONSTRUCTION (CD by Zoharum) *
SHAME – WHITE MAN (CD by Cacophonous Revival Recordings) *
THIRTEEN HURTS – CHEMTRAILS (CDR by No Part Of It) *
ARSENIJE JOVANOVIC – LA PARATTA (CD by Bolt Records) *
MGLA ZDAJE SIE PRZYCHODZIC Z ZEWNATRZ (CD by Bolt Records) *
PIOTR STASIK & ARTUR ZAGAJEWSKI – OPERA ABOUT POLAND (DVD by Bolt Records)
ANT ORANGE – YOU’RE SUPER IN DIAGONAL (CD by Karaoke Kalk) *
THE SODALITY OF THE SHADOWS – PHANTOM CITIES (CD/LP by Persepolis Records) *
LA MORTE YOUNG (7″ by Doubtful Sounds) *
ISOLATED COMMUNITY – EVERYONE IN THE VILLAGE HATES YOU (CDR by Northumberland Audio Capture) *
STERILE GARDEN – ACIDOSIS (CDR by No Part Of It) *
RUBBER BUS – RETURN TO REASON (cassette, private) *

Newsbits: Sopko, Laswell & Sorey / Sun Ra Arkestra / New Horizons Compilation / Navarro & Holmes / Rachel Musson

The new release from Mike Sopko, Bill Laswell, and Tyshawn Sorey is reviewed.

The new Sun Ra Arkestra release is also reviewed.

A new compilation of South African jazz is reviewed.

Another review, this time of the new Aquiles Navarro / Tcheser Holmes release, is out.

And finally, we have a Rachel Musson interview.

Keith Jarrett Health Update

He had been scheduled to return to Carnegie the following March for another of the solo recitals that have done the most to create his legend — like the one captured on the recording “Budapest Concert,” to be released on Oct. 30. But that Carnegie performance was abruptly canceled, along with the rest of his concert calendar. At the time, Mr. Jarrett’s longtime record label, ECM, cited unspecified health issues. There has been no official update in the two years since. But this month Mr. Jarrett, 75, broke the silence, plainly stating what happened to him: a stroke in late February 2018, followed by another one that May. It is unlikely he will ever perform in public again.

Rum Music Reviews For October 

Source: The Quietus.

Jennifer Lucy Allan contends with early computer improvisations, wordless cave singing in Java, and dynamic adventures in trombone in this month’s trip to The Zone

George Lewis – Rainbow Family
Antonina Nowacka – Lamunan
Rian Treanor – File Under UK Metaplasm
Maarja Nuut & Sun Araw – Fantasias For Violin & Guitar
Raven Chacon – An Anthology Of Chants Operations
Charlie Morrow – America Lament
Laura Agnusdei – Hand In Hand With A Stranger
Jon Collin – Backporch Fågelsundet Midsommar 20​/​20
Catherine Lamb – Prisma Interius VII & VIII

RIP Kevin O’Meara

Percussionist Kevin O’Meara, 40, has died. O’Meara was an active member of various music communities in the Baltimore-Washington area and was notable for playing with Baltimore’s Dan Deacon Ensemble and with DC area improvisational group Colla Parte. He played live dates and recorded with both groups, appearing on the Deacon ensemble’s recordings “Bromst” and “America” and on Colla Parte’s “Periplus” and “Sound Is Invisible Color.” In addition to performing in twenty-one countries, he was a member of Baltimore’s art and performance collective Wham City and created visual art as well as music. In recent years he lived in West Virginia, Hawaii, and Maine as well as in Baltimore.

The Top 10 Heaviest Prog Albums Ever 

Source: Louder.

Pallbearer frontman Brett Campbell and bassist Joseph D Rowland don’’t just love prog, they love prog – and the further out, the better. When we asked duo to talk us through the heaviest prog albums ever made, they went deep. “Many associate progressive rock with dudes wearing outlandish costumes playing often indulgent, technical songs about obscure fantastical subjects,” says Brett. “Sounds a lot like what a lot of people think metal is, right? There’s some grain of truth to that assessment, but, in both cases, it shows a lack of understanding of the huge variety of styles all grouped under a single label. It’s a surface view of a deep well of music. How similar to one another are, for example, Meshuggah, Neurosis, and Finntroll, really? Not very. Yet, they’re all metal bands.

The Free Jazz Collective Reviews

Source: The Free Jazz Collective.

Two from Lao Dan

RIP Toshinori Kondō 近藤等則 (December 15, 1948 – October 17, 2020)

Luise Volkmann & Didier Matry – Wünsche (Umland, 2019) ****½

Merzbow, Mats Gustafsson, Balasz Pandi – Cuts Open (RareNoise, 2020) *****

William Hooker & Phill Niblock – Flowers Of The Spirit (send+receive festival 2020)

John McCowen – Live At ISSUE Project Room (DAAANG, 2020) ****½

Exotic Sin – Customer’s Copy (Blank Forms Editions, 2020) ****½

Luís Vicente – Maré (Cipsela, 2020) *****

Curt Sydnor – Deep End Shallow (Out of Your Head, 2020) **** ½

Best New Jazz Of October 2020 From Stereogum

Source: Stereogum.

Trumpeter Toshinori Kondo has died at 71. He made his debut on the Japanese avant-garde scene in the early 1970s, working with pianist Yosuke Yamashita, but within a few years had moved to New York and begun working with a range of American and European jazz players and improvisers, including drummer Milford Graves, guitarist Derek Bailey, bassist William Parker, and saxophonist/composer John Zorn, among others. As early as 1979, on his album Fuigo From A Different Dimension, he was one of the few trumpeters to record and perform solo. He was deeply interested in electronics and manipulating the sound of his horn with pedals and effects, moving far beyond anything like a traditional jazz sound and into swirling, hypnotic abstraction.