Francesco Guerri Interview

Source: The Jazz Session.

Italian cellist Francesco Guerri has a new solo cello album on RareNoise Records called Su Mimmi non si spara! (“Don’t shoot Mimmi!”) In this interview, Guerri talks about the path from improvisation to composition; how a chance meeting brought him back to the cello in a new way; why he wants his music to reflect the truths of life; and more.

Extended Techniques Podcast #3 – The Ah of Steve Dalachinsky 

Source: extended techniques.

This podcast is a tribute to an award-winning downtown New York free-jazz poet and concert aficionado, Steve Dalachinsky. It features Dalachinsky’s studio and concert recordings with Thurston Moore, Tom Surgal, Vito Ricci, Vernon Reid, Matthew Shipp, Aaron Novik, Please the Trees, Pasquale Cangiano, Asiff Tsahar and Marcos Campello, and an interview with one of his publishers, Matvei Yankelevich.

Kris Davis Interviewed

Source: burning ambulance.

Kris Davis is a really fascinating pianist who’s been on the New York music scene for almost 20 years. She’s made a number of excellent albums as a leader and as a solo artist, and is also a member of groups like Paradoxical Frog with Ingrid Laubrock and Tyshawn Sorey, and Anti-House with Laubrock, Mary Halvorson, John Hébert and Tom Rainey. I saw that group perform at the Vision Festival at Roulette in Brooklyn back in 2012, and they’ve got three albums which are all worth your time. She also recently joined a group formed by cornet player Rob Mazurek, with Ingebrigt Håker Flaten and Chad Taylor, for his Desert Encrypts festival in Marfa, Texas, and they’ve released a live recording, Desert Encrypts Vol. 1.

Andrew Cyrille Interview

Source: Greenleaf Music by Dave Douglas.

Dave visits legendary drummer and composer Andrew Cyrille to talk about how he organizes his music, why he calls Dave “David,” and his recent record Lebroba with Wadada Leo Smith and Bill Frisell. They also discuss his upbringing in a Haitian family in Brooklyn, NY, and his beginnings as a jazz musician. We hear excerpts of Cecil Taylor’s Unit Structures and Conquistador!, which Mr. Cyrille played on in 1966. Humorous and insightful comments ensue.

Wendy Eisenberg Interviewed

Source: Heavy Metal Bebop.

Wendy Eisenberg is a jazz guitarist by training who can often be heard playing just about anything but conventional jazz guitar. That includes free improv, art pop, noise and avant-garde punk with radically inventive bands like the now-defunct Birthing Hips and the currently active Editrix. In 2018, during an episode of Jeremiah Cymerman’s excellent 5049 Podcast, Wendy — who uses gender-neutral pronouns — made a passing mention of their love for the Australian death-metal band Portal, and at that point, I knew I wanted to speak to them for Heavy Metal Bebop. We met up in March and delved into Wendy’s vast musical universe. Topics discussed include: how hearing Sonny Sharrock helped expand their musical horizons, why Portal is their favorite band ever, why they feel like an outsider in both jazz and metal, how Birthing Hips flourished within the context of higher education, why they’re not a fan of jazz covers of pop and rock tunes, how their early love for Pantera informs the music of Editrix, what they took away from playing with Curtis Fuller and Earl Klugh, and much more.

Jamaaladeen Tacuma Interview

Source: burning ambulance.

Bassist Jamaaladeen Tacuma is a legend. He was barely out of high school when guitarist Reggie Lucas recommended him to Ornette Coleman, who hired him for what would become Prime Time. He stayed with Coleman for a dozen years, working with James “Blood” Ulmer and recording albums on his own at the same time. He’s been part of some really amazing records that I love, including Derek Bailey‘s Mirakle, James Carter‘s Layin’ in the Cut, James Brandon Lewis‘s Days of FreeMan, and the Young Philadelphians‘ Live in Tokyo. He also produced the new Last Poets album, Transcending Toxic Times.

In this interview, we talk about a bunch of different aspects of his career, his sound, his style, his upbringing in Philadelphia, and his interest in fashion. In addition to being a musician, Tacuma runs a consignment boutique in Philadelphia called the Redd Carpet Room, where he sells designer clothes he picks up while traveling around the world. This guy is sharp in every possible way, so I really think you’re going to enjoy this conversation a lot. I know I did.