PROBES #32.2 From Chris Cutler

Source: RWM Podcasts.

In PROBES #32 Chris Culter traces the history of some newly invented instruments (in the 20th century), including the Chromelodion, the Boo, the Mazdaphone, the Quadrangulis Reversum, the Crystal Baschets, Harry Bertoia’s Sonambiente, the unearthly Daxophone and Arthur Harris’ Mother Lap Cello Harp, Whispering Harp and the14.5 metre viol, whose lowest strings are inaudible to the human ear.

Wadada & Merzbow Celebrated on Flotation Device Podcast

Source: Flotation Device/

Flotation Device celebrates the 80th birthday of Wadada Leo Smith, the 65th birthday of Merzbow and the 50th anniversary of Sun Ra’s first concert tour in Egypt with a cherishing look at all three musicians’ esoteric approach to radical music. We also launch our retrospective of 2021’s best new albums of avant-garde music with some compelling music by George Crumb, Fred Frith, Ikue Mori, Joseph Kamaru AKA KMRU, Bill Horist, Sound-In, Acoustic Fringe, Luca Quintavalle, Rhys Chatham and the late Ghédalia Tazartès.

PROBES #31 Podcast From Chris Cutler

Source: PROBES.

In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music).

A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of ‘music’. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do.

BA Podcast 68: Andrew Cyrille

Source: burning ambulance.

Andrew Cyrille is the last man standing from the first wave of free jazz drummers. He and Milford Graves, Sunny Murray, and Rashied Ali really revolutionized jazz rhythm in their playing with Cecil Taylor, Albert Ayler, John Coltrane and other musicians in the early to mid ’60s. Their influence was huge, and each of them brought a different perspective and instantly identifiable style to the music. What I hear when I listen to Andrew Cyrille, whether he’s playing with Cecil Taylor or Anthony Braxton or in any other situation, is an incredible precision and consideration. He really seems to be thinking about every single strike and placing it with unbelievable care, even when he’s playing ridiculously fast.

Adventures In Sound And Music From July 29

Source: The Wire.

Alex Ward
“Brow”
From Gated
(Discus)

Orchestre Tout Puissant Marcel Duchamp
“Empty Skies”
From We’re OK. But We’re Lost Anyway.
(Les Disques Bongo Joe/L’Autre Distribution)

Ndenga Andre Destin Et Les Golden Sounds
“Ngamba”
From Various Cameroon Garage Funk
(Analog Africa)

Francisco Mela featuring William Parker & Matthew Shipp
“Dark Light”
From Music Frees Our Souls Vol 1
(577)

Romy Caen, Nick Ashwood & Jim Denley
“Part 2”
From Between Back And Foreground
(Caterpillar)

David Toop/Akio Suzuki/Lawrence English
“It’s Winter Already”
From Breathing Spirit Forms
(Room40)

David Lee Myers
“GEO 2 Pannotia”
From Reduced To A Geometrical Point
(Crónica)

Lawrence English
“The River”
From A Mirror Holds The Sky
(Room 40)

Alan Vega/Ben Vaughn/Barb Dwyer/Palmyra Delran
“High Speed Roller”
From Alan Vega After Dark
(In The Red)

PROBES #30 – Chris Cutler’s Podcast

Source: RWM Podcasts.

In the late nineteenth century two facts conspired to change the face of music: the collapse of common practice tonality (which overturned the certainties underpinning the world of art music), and the invention of a revolutionary new form of memory, sound recording (which redefined and greatly empowered the world of popular music). A tidal wave of probes and experiments into new musical resources and new organisational practices ploughed through both disciplines, bringing parts of each onto shared terrain before rolling on to underpin a new aesthetics able to follow sound and its manipulations beyond the narrow confines of ‘music’. This series tries analytically to trace and explain these developments, and to show how, and why, both musical and post-musical genres take the forms they do. In PROBES #30 artists, composers and performers make water, ice, glass, fire, wind and Styrofoam their soloists in installations, recordings and events designed for concert halls, galleries, the Phillips pavilion, TV series’ and open air gatherings.

The Visitor 010721 Podcast

Source: The Visitor.

Two hours of underground music from Cambridge and beyond.

Tracklisting:

Wolves in the Throne Room – Mountain Magick
Enumclaw – Cents
David John Morris – Rhododendron
Matt Christensen – I Had a Vision I Could Move Anywhere
Mind Maintenance – Glow & Glimmer
Six Organs of Admittance – Somewhere in the Hexagon of Saturn
Sao Paulo Underground & Tupperwear – Perenquen
Takuma Watanabe – Damned
mHz – Golden Hour, Blue Hour, Dusk
Domiziano Maselli – A Desolation Chant
Jaimie Branch – Theme Nothing
Amy Cutler – Earth Relic
Jason Van Wyk – Retention|
Manja Ristic – Onda Interna
Faith Coloccia & Philip Jeck – Acquire The Air
Marcus Fisher – Shape To Shore
Shuttle358 – Frame
Thomas Koner – Nuuk

PROBES #29.2 is Out

Source: RWM Podcasts. The latest podcast from Chris Cutler.

The PROBES AUXILIARIES dig deeper into the main programme topic but are also programmed for your ecstatic listening pleasure; so examples here are edited and sequenced and cut together on the wheels of steal; there’s no talking either (at least not by me), so you need to download the playlist to get the details, backstory and relevance of each of the pieces featured. In this new episode, composers and performers expand their classical, contemporary, avant garde, jazz, rock, electronic and installation art vocabularies by incorporating real or virtual collaborations with wildlife, soundscapes, insects, amphibia, birds, whales and wolves. And we learn what a whale has in common with a nightingale.

Curated by Chris Cutler

Myra Melford Curates a Playlist

Source: I CARE IF YOU LISTEN.

“This is music with an endless capacity for elasticity and surprise,” NPR wrote of Myra Melford’s 2018 release, The Other Side of Air, “along with an affirming spirit of coherence.” The pianist, composer, bandleader and University of California, Berkeley, professor Myra Melford—whom the New Yorker called “a stalwart of the new-jazz movement”—has spent the last three decades making original music that is equally challenging and engaging. She’s explored an array of formats, among them ruminative solo-piano recitals, deeply interactive combos and ambitious multidisciplinary programs, probing the space shared between dynamic small-group jazz and contemporary chamber music. Melford is a recipient of the Alpert Award in the Arts for Music, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Doris Duke Performing Artist Award.