Bohemian in Exile Shows

From Detroit’s Bohemian folks:

Monday Sept 28th: Evan Parker/Ned Rothenberg Duo at 2739 Edwin
A leader of the American avant garde joins a leader of the European avant garde in a duo for winds that features free improvised music with a startling level of interplay.

British saxophonist Evan Parker is a pivotal figure in the development of European improvised music. Along with his early collaborator, guitarist Derek Bailey, he pioneered a new approach to free playing that moved away from a jazz based vocabulary. Their work in the mid-sixties was intended to be non-idiomatic, but both musicians had such distinct musical voices that they couldn’t help becoming an idiom unto themselves! Parker has worked with Cecil Taylor, Peter Brotzmann, Tony Oxley, Anthony Braxton et al., as well as more pop related performers like Spitirtualized, Spring Heel Jack and Robert Wyatt.

New Yorker Ned Rothenberg plays a variety of wind instruments, including alto saxophone, clarinet, bass clarinet and Shakuhachi. Involved with the ‘downtown scene’- performing with folks like John Zorn, Tom Cora and Marc Ribot– Rothenberg is also internationally-minded in his collaborations, which have included Tuvan throat singers and South Korean musicians.

Doors at 8 pm, music at 8:20. Located at 2739 Edwin, just off Jos Campau in Hamtramck. $10 suggested minimum donation. Please note, there is free parking behind 2739 Edwin, accessed by the alley along side the building. Please park there (if possible) to lower the impact on the neighbors. Thanks

Coming Soon:
10/2 Digital Primitives (Cooper Moore, Assif Tsahar, Chad Taylor) at 2739 Edwin
10/22 Jason Stein
11/4 Plastic Crime Wave, Kat Hernandez Duo

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Hugh Hopper

I haven’t confirmed this yet, but the word is out that bassist Hugh Hopper, most known for his stint with Soft Machine, passed away yesterday. I’ll update this post once the news is properly sourced.

The message boards have been buzzing with the news of Hugh’s passing, and his Wikipedia entry has been updated to mark his death. Sad news.

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Bagatellen Reviews

From Bagatellen:

Jean-Luc Guionnet – Non-Organic Bias (Herbal International)

Malaysian sound artist Goh Lee Kwang began the new year in earnest, with several releases on his labels, Herbal and Why Not. Less enterprising than many labels in kind, and more a boutique project, Herbal International has managed to deal out one of the year’s most absorbing recordings, by French improviser and self-described […]

Harry Miller’s Isipingo – Full Steam Ahead

Cape Town-born bassist Harry Miller was already well-established in London jazz circles, playing with figures like Kenneth Terroade, John Surman and Mike Westbrook, by the time fellow South Africans the Blue Notes arrived on the UK scene in 1966. It wasn’t until about five years later that Miller joined former Blue Notes […]

Soft Machine – Drop

Mention the word “Canterbury” in certain circles and the likely reference is “Soft Machine.” Followers of the group’s transition from quirky psychedelia to a relentless and anthemic jazz-rock hybrid seem split on whether they like their Softs with Robert Wyatt’s otherworldly vocal whimsy or with only his drumming propelling organist Mike Ratledge, bassist […]

FAB Trio and Nu Band on Porter

Bassist-composer Joe Fonda has been a stalwart figure in the international creative improvisation community since the late ‘70s, though his fifteen years of regular appearances with reedman-composer Anthony Braxton probably stand out the most in his lengthy discography. However, it would be incomplete to call Fonda solely a Braxton acolyte – his work with pianist […]

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Interview with Leonardo Pavkovic of MoonJune Records

From jazzuality.com:

Some people believe in following the market trend will lead to success, but think if everybody does it. Music as a progressive thing needs much more than that to grow. It’s good to see what the market want, but on the other side, we can’t close our eyes to the alternatives and something new in creativity that often come with great skills and amazing music. What I’m saying is, we do really need some source which dare to go against the market trends, so music will keep on having something new to offer.

Thank God we have MoonJune Records. Moonjune came in 2001 as the brainchild of Leonardo Pavkovic, the enterpreneurial producer, tour manager and promoter. MoonJune got its name from “The Moon in June” the Soft Machine drummer Robert Wyatt’s famous 1970 epic. MoonJune’s focus is to release internationally-situated music by atists exploring the expanding boundaries of genuine, challenging, non-over-produced music that can’t be categorized easily into any specific format. With 28 titles available in the catalogue right now, being reviewed worldwide in over 40 countries, and of course will keep growing bigger, we know that MoonJune is fully commited on the right path and at the same time essential for the music world, especially jazz in particular.

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All About Jazz Reviews

From All About Jazz:

30-May-09 Orchestre National de Jazz
Orchestre National de Jazz: Around Robert Wyatt (Bee Jazz)
Reviewed by Jeff Dayton-Johnson

30-May-09 Nicole Mitchell’s Black Earth Strings
Renegades (Delmark Records)
Reviewed by Troy Collins

30-May-09 simakDialog
Demi Masa (Moonjune Records)
Reviewed by Glenn Astarita

29-May-09 Lawrence Casserley / Adam Linson
Integument (Psi)
Reviewed by John Eyles

29-May-09 Rudresh Mahanthappa’s Indo-Pak Coalition
Apti (Innova Recordings)
Reviewed by Troy Collins

29-May-09 Denman Maroney Quintet
Udentity (Clean Feed Records)
Reviewed by Glenn Astarita

29-May-09 The Naked Future
Gigantomachia (ESP Disk)
Reviewed by Jerry D’Souza

29-May-09 John Hollenbeck
Rainbow Jimmies (GPE Records)
Reviewed by Lyn Horton

28-May-09 Paul Motian
Live at the Village Vanguard, Vol. II (Winter & Winter)
Reviewed by Ted Gordon

27-May-09 KLiP Trio
Herman Sonny Blount (Omniversal Ambassador) (Edgetone Records)
Reviewed by Glenn Astarita

26-May-09 Sophie Agnel
Capsizing Moments (Emanem)
Reviewed by John Eyles

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Bagatellen Reviews

From Bagatellen:

Soft Machine – Drop
Mention the word “Canterbury” in certain circles and the likely reference is “Soft Machine.” Followers of the group’s transition from quirky psychedelia to a relentless and anthemic jazz-rock hybrid seem split on whether they like their Softs with Robert Wyatt’s otherworldly vocal whimsy or with only his drumming propelling organist Mike Ratledge, bassist […]

FAB Trio and Nu Band on Porter
Bassist-composer Joe Fonda has been a stalwart figure in the international creative improvisation community since the late ‘70s, though his fifteen years of regular appearances with reedman-composer Anthony Braxton probably stand out the most in his lengthy discography. However, it would be incomplete to call Fonda solely a Braxton acolyte – his work with pianist […]

Dominic Duval/Jimmy Halperin – Monk Dreams
“Monkish” is one of those descriptors that’s unavoidable in writing about jazz – Thelonious Monk’s imprint on the landscape of modern jazz and improvised music is huge and, more importantly, incredibly diverse. Odd-interval repetition, rhythmic bounce and dissonant delicacy have come to characterize a large segment of players, and soprano […]

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Moon June Records to Release Archival Soft Machine

6 Soft Machine CDs (2)
Image by svennevenn via Flickr

From Moon June Records:

This CD documents an often overlooked phase in the long and complex history of Soft Machine – Australian drummer Phil Howard‘s five-month interim behind the drum stool between Robert Wyatt‘s departure and his eventual long-term replacement John Marshall. It did last long enough to record half of the studio album “Fifth” (1972) and a couple of BBC radio sessions, but until now no official document of that line-up in its preferred environment – the stage. Howard was brought into Soft Machine by saxophonist Elton Dean, both being members of Elton’s side project Just Us, and under their combined influence the band became freer and wilder than ever before (or after) in its existence, pushing longtime leaders Mike Ratledge and Hugh Hopper into unchartered areas of electric madness. Before long they’d decided this wasn’t the way to go, but meanwhile the line-up had antagonised audiences throughout extensive tours of the UK and Europe. This CD documents the German leg of the tour and, as veteran music journalist Steve Lake notes in his detailed liner notes, is a revelation – a glimpse of a highly exciting alternative route Soft Machine decided not to explore further.

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