A Lifetime of Music Celebrated at Zankel Hall and Kaplan Penthouse

The New York Times covers Elliott Carter’s 100th birthday.

Among the challenges that Elliott Carter has faced during a long, distinguished career as a composer, popular approval might be the one he least expected to grapple with. “It’s a little bit frightening, because I’m not used to being appreciated,” he explained during an onstage interview with Jeremy Geffen, Carnegie Hall’s director of artistic planning, on Friday night at Zankel Hall. “So when I am, I think I’ve made a mistake.”

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Axiom Ensemble’s take on Messiaen Reviews

Olivier Messiaen
Image via Wikipedia

From the NY Times:

The stars that govern music must have been aligned exactly 100 years ago. Olivier Messiaen was born in Avignon, France, on Dec. 10, 1908. The next day Elliott Carter was born in New York. Messiaen died at 83 in 1992, composing until the end, still playing the organ every Sunday at the exquisite Trinité church in Paris. Mr. Carter remains very much with us and active, a miraculous fluke of nature.

Messiaen’s centenary has been acknowledged around the world this year, and the Miller Theater at Columbia University presented an exciting program as part of its Composer Portraits series on Saturday night. The deft conductor Jeffrey Milarsky led the Axiom Ensemble, a flexible group of Julliard School students who have palpable enthusiasm for challenging contemporary music and the technical skills to play it.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Classical Listings from the New York Times

Olivier Messiaen
Image via Wikipedia

More from the Times.

? AXIOM ENSEMBLE (Saturday) This concert by the Axiom Ensemble — part of the Miller Theater’s Composer Portraits series — promises to be one of the major events in the commemoration of Olivier Messiaen’s centenary this season. With Jeffrey Milarsky conducting, the orchestra performs “Couleurs de la Cité Céleste,” “Et Exspecto Resurrectionem Mortuorum” and the “Sept Haïkaï.” At 8 p.m., Miller Theater at Columbia University, Broadway at 116th Street, Morningside Heights, (212) 854-7799, millertheater.com; $25.

? DAY OF CARTER (Saturday) The New York Philharmonic, in its full form, has contributed precious little to the Elliott Carter centenary celebrations that have occupied much of the musical world. But the orchestra’s musicians are convening on Saturday for a program of Mr. Carter’s chamber works, including the Clarinet Quintet, “Figment III” for solo bass, and the premiere of his “Poems of Louis Zukofsky,” with Lucy Shelton as the soprano soloist. The program opens with a filmed interview with Mr. Carter and the composer Steven Stucky, and ends with a discussion between Mr. Carter and Matias Tarnopolsky. At 2 p.m.. Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse, 165 West 65th Street, Lincoln Center, (212) 721-6500, nyphil.org; $25; $12 for students and 65+. (Kozinn)

? MAKING MUSIC: ELLIOTT CARTER (Friday) Elliott Carter’s 100th birthday is now behind us — it was on Thursday — but composers’ birthdays are typically celebrated for at least a year and a half these days, so the party rolls on. In this installment of Carnegie Hall’s “Making Music” series, a solid new-music chamber ensemble — with the cellist Fred Sherry, the flutist Tara Helen O’Connor, the clarinetist Charles Neidich and the violinist Rolf Schulte among the players — gives the world premiere of “Duetting” and the New York premiere of “Mosaic.” Also on the program are “Canon for 4,” “Enchanted Preludes,” “Gra,” the Duo for Violin and Piano, “Con Leggerezza Penosa” and “Esprit Rude/Esprit Doux.” Included as well are film interludes by Frank Scheffer. At 7:30 p.m., Zankel Hall, Carnegie Hall, (212) 247-7800, carnegiehall.org; $30. (Kozinn)

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Olivier Messiaen at 100 at Symphony Space

Olivier Messiaen
Image via Wikipedia

From NYTimes.com:

Olivier Messiaen’s centenary celebrations have made his music more plentiful than usual this season, but it’s not as if his works were neglected at other times. Organists play his challenging, visionary music regularly, and if the orchestral works could stand greater exposure, the chamber and vocal scores have become staples both in concert halls and on recordings. Certainly his “Quartet for the End of Time” (1941) is regarded as a modernist classic with a berth in the standard canon.

The quartet was a pillar of “Olivier Messiaen at 100,” a centenary tribute at Symphony Space on Thursday evening that included another major score, the otherworldly “Visions de l’Amen” (1943). Both are steeped in the Roman Catholic mystical imagery that informed virtually every note Messiaen composed, and both are exquisite examples of his idiosyncratic, wholly expressive style, in which dissonant harmonies are matched with melodies drawn from bird song and Indonesian gamelan music.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]