Undead Festival Live Review: Cinco DIY-Bring Your Own Mayo

An UNDEAD Improvised Music Review by Monique Avakian

Though I brought homemade chocolate-chip cookies for bait, sadly, I encountered no Zombies. However, there were several Other-Worldly moments that occurred at Brooklyn’s I-Beam on May 5, 2013, including a sighting of Elizabeth Reed making her way around the indeterminate and evolving wreckage near the 7th Street and 4th Avenue crossroads.

During the I-Beam portion of Search & Restore’s annual UNDEAD Festival, audience members were treated to a drum duo on two kits (Vinnie Sperrazza/Jeff Davis Duo); a trio of free-improv (Jesse Stacken Group with Mat Maneri and Devin Gray) and an electronica~trombone improv set with Brian Drye and Jacob Garchik. Big Eyed Rabbit (Max Johnson, bass; Jeff Davis, drums; Ross Martin, guitar) rounded out the evening, but, unfortunately, I had to leave before I got to hear them.

DRUM DUO:
Vinnie Sperrazza and Jeff Davis

These compositions and improvisations were based on the rudiments, and I felt happy when I heard a flam and got that. Not being solid myself with all the rudiments, though, I know missed a lot of conceptual drum~puns; BUT, I had a good time anyway, enjoying two jazz drummers’ takes on the essentials of the extras based on the essentials.

The first tune, “Imaginary Friend,” went by really fast. Strangely, I don’t have any notes on this. Probably because I was too distracted obsessing about Sperrazza’s suped-up, vintage kit — a 1948 black Ludwig (!).

Second up, we had an exploration of Ted Reed’s Syncopation, which was really enjoyable. All drummers know that book because of the dorky cover, which has become a doppelganger for all the cool stuff inside. Sperrazza and Davis made it all the more cool and super intricate, especially at the beginning when the pair started off and maintained a soft volume for a very long time. Later, there was a lot of low-down on the toms spiced with rim clicks and some spontaneous conducting and exclaiming on the part of Sperrazza that led to more joyful joint improv. The whole thing ended with a loud crescendo into a double forte. Ted, I’m sure, would have approved.

Tune #3 began with a lot of cymbal wash and soft toms and fingers brushing against skins. Here, the duo created a very jungle-like, adventurous landscape, conjuring up all sorts of benevolent pacing power animals that lent some heft to the evening. The tune continued to evolve and at one point Davis pushed the butt end of a wooden vibes mallet across his Ride to get a singular soft searing sound; an industrial sound, but mysteriously non-abrasive. This was quite beautiful and enticing—to all spirits, earth-bound as well as transdimensional.

Near the end, this tune took a further ethereal turn when someone’s phone softly made that melodic five figure corporate pattern we all now have annoyingly ingrained in our consciousness. Interestingly, this did not repeat, leading me to think that this must have been a riff offered by the Imaginary Friend Sperrazza encouraged us to wonder about earlier. Then, again, maybe it was Elizabeth Reed calling for Ted. Or, perhaps, it could have been YOU!

In any case, the musicians deftly incorporated this tiny communiqué, ending the piece with a Sperrazza witticism about the day being a DIY Have Your Own Fun kind of thing.

#4 “The Hard One”: This felt like opening a treasure chest of nesting boxes filled with 5s and 10s. Charming and spritely, this exploration expanded my understanding of what might be possible if you trade in unison, if you know what I mean. This piece scaffolded around a structure that felt simultaneously collapsible and expandable with a quick ending. Maybe too quick! Hey, we were enjoying that!

By the time we got to #5, “Heretics on the Theme of Heresy,” we had already learned that we could explore “militarism without the militarism,” so we were ready for this intriguing change-up into a time-based rock feel where the two took turns: one improvising, the other keeping time.

Davis, I noticed, has this sly way of sliding into a ripping fast run, and, in this tune, this really solidified the groove throughout in a very subliminal and pleasing way. You could learn a lot about how to get around the kit from watching this guy, especially when he’s playing soft and fast.

Something really cool happened in the middle of Heretics: somehow, these two managed a complete surfer feel for a minute even though both were playing only snare. Weight, depth, punch, harmony and melody were all evoked clearly, yet, the only sound was snare. Wow! How did they do that!?!

Sperrazza explored a lot of tom work inside of Heretics, moving around the kit deconstructing a bunch of ideas and at moments looking vertically somewhat like Keith Moon without sounding like him at all. And wasn’t Keith Moon into surfer music? Hmmmm…..more DIY magic to ponder, along with Sperrazza inserting a single measure of a swing beat near the end: charming!

TRIO OF FREE IMPROV – Jesse Stacken, Mat Maneri, Devin Gray

This group was the most abstract musically, but conceptually, and with great irony, they began with the most mundane kind of conjure: horns blaring, cars rudely zipping by dangerously close…. It’s the dead of night, and it feels like the end of the world. You realize you’ve been pinned against the cold white tile of the carbon-monoxide filled tunnel buried under the sad and lonely city. And serious choices have got to be made.

Yeah!

Whew!

Eventually, we crossed over into a more pastoral place, with rumbly drums and long bowed single notes from viola. Here, Stacken decided to make full use of the entire piano, moving up and down with really long, loud arpeggiated figures. Then he started pulling these sweet high pings out of the piano strings (literally), choosing next to alternate those with a classical sounding motif played straight up on the keys. At this point, Maneri started tapping the floor and instrument case with his bow while drummer Devin Gray scraped along on something….I think it was metal cookie cooling rack ?!?!?! (He also had a Ride made out of a piece of sheet metal and a hit hat with two mis-matched plates).

Anyway, before long, Maneri’s viola started to bend and Stacken started to pound into repetitive chords forged in sets of four tossed with sporadic rapid runs up and down. Furniture drawers in several adjacent buildings began to open and close in time to all of the sudden slamming sounds. Rugs turned into tigers and lamps flew around the room as various spirits passed through. I felt as if I might dematerialize at any moment!

I didn’t though, just became aware that Maneri was playing duple figures in what seemed like a familiar song turned upside down. Then he and the drummer galloped away, just briefly, before Maneri came back to move into a long drawn out series of single notes, bringing all of that intensity to distill into gentle piano into silence. We all hung there, suspended, for a
long time.

What a fierce experience!

Ooooh!

DUET~QUARTET ELECTRONICA TROMBONE
Brian Drye and Jacob Garchik

Here you had two who became four, with a lot of wires and gizmos and what the heck is going on, I wondered, as it dawned on me that Garchik’s trombone mute was electrified (!) and hooked up to a pedal.

Both trombonists had electric keyboards as well as the acoustic piano to play. Drye had a very simple yet powerful-looking turquoise box, which he arranged carefully on the floor. It soon became clear that this was for looping. Everything was wired into a big black box which at first they couldn’t get working; eventually it was determined that one switch had to be pulled, and we were off like Frankenstein:

Somehow, the duo created unusual loops live in the moment to improvise with. How they managed to make these live transitions so smoothly is unclear and amazing. The ostinatos became very trippy and playful, eventually pulling us into a room full of purring cats on acid, suspended in time like that famous photo of Dali jumping with cats and water. The sound of trombones against all the electronica was warmly intriguing.

At one point, Garchik used the volume switch like a scratch DJ and Drye rigged it so there were several layers of scratching syncopation with the sounds morphing from a tuba timbre to industrial clapslaps to straight up piano.

Then Garchik quoted himself from his new album, The Heavens (!) and Yeats’ little silver fish spoke to me directly, vowing an open musical secret. (*)

The UNDEAD music festival – essential and invigorating.
Catch it next year. I DIY~dare you!

(*) Yeats’ poem, The Song of the Wandering Aengus, I just found out, was originally published in a book entitled: The Wind Among the Reeds. HA!

For further exploration:

http://www.searchandrestore.com/
http://undeadmusic.com/news/
http://ibeambrooklyn.com/calendar/
http://www.vinniesperrazza.org/
http://www.jeffdavisdrums.com/
http://jessestacken.com/
http://devingraymusic.com/
http://musicians.allaboutjazz.com/musician.php?id=9028#.UZGP1I5Rjud (Maneri)
http://jacobgarchik.com/
http://briandrye.com/
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/244302 Yeats poem

Inbetweens/DeProphetis/Dalachinsky-Maneri/Berne at RUCMA

Tim Berne
Image via Wikipedia

From New Yorks’ Rise Up Creative Music & Arts:

Start: 01/25/2010 – 7:00pm
7PM – The Inbetweens: Mike Gamble (guitar), Noah Jarrett (bass), Conor Elmes (drums)
8PM – Maryanne DeProphetis/Ron Horton/Landon Knoblock/Dean Johnson: Maryanne DeProphetis (voice), Ron Horton (trumpet), Landon Knoblock (keys), Dean Johnson (bass)
9PM – Steve Dalachinsky/Mat Maneri: Steve Dalachinsky (poetry), Mat Maneri (violin, viola)
10PM – Four Limones: Tim Berne (alto sax), Rick Parker (trombone), Mark Aanderud (keys), Hernan Hecht (drummer)

The Local 269
269 East Houston
at the corner of Suffolk Street
F to Second Avenue
Admission: $10 per set / $20 for the night
Students/seniors: $7 per set / $15 for the night
For More Info:
http://www.myspace.com/rucmanyc
http://www.visionfestival.org
http://www.artsforart.org

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A Celebration of the Life of Joe Maneri

From the Boston Microtonal Society:

A Celebration of the Life of Joe Maneri
Irondale Center
February 9, 2010, 8pm

What: A concert to remember and celebrate the life of Joe Maneri
When: Tuesday, February 9, 2010, 8pm
Where: Irondale Center, 85 South Oxford Street, Brooklyn, C train to Lafayette, 1/2/3/4/5/Q/B trains to Atlantic Ave, R/M/N/D/trains to Pacific St
Cost: Suggested donation $10 to be donated to Boston Microtonal Society

Featuring:
Barre Phillips, bass, Jim Black, drums, Tony Malaby, saxophone, Joe Morris, bass, John Medeski, piano Tom Halter, trumpet, Matthew Shipp, piano, Randy Peterson, drums, Ray Anderson, trombone, Craig Taborn, piano, Joe McPhee, saxophone, Joe Karten, trumpet, Matt Moran, vibes, Ed Schuller, bass, Dave Ballou, trumpet, Steve Dalachinsky, poetry, Mike Rivard, electric bass, Liberty Ellman, guitar, Herb Robertson, trumpet, Chris Speed, saxophone, Matt Lavelle, bass clarinet, Pandelis Karayorgis, piano, Noah Kaplan, saxophone, Mat Maneri, viola, and others to be confirmed…..

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Mat Maneri in Brooklyn

American Jazz musician and composer Mat Maneri.
Image via Wikipedia

Mat Maneri has an upcoming show at Brooklyn’s Barbes:

October 8th

MAT MANERI & Friends. Mat Maneri is a violin and viola player, specifically derivatives such as the five-string viola, the electric six-string violin, and the baritone violin. He is the son of the saxophonist Joe Maneri. He has performed and recorded with Cecil Taylor, Matthew Shipp, Joe Morris, Joe Maneri, Tim Berne, Mark Dresser, William Parker. He has released a number of albums of his trio and quartet on ECM. He will be joined by some of his friends.

8:00pm – MAT MANERI & RANDY PETERSON –
10:00pm – MAT MANERI QUARTET with with Randy Peterson – drums; Garth Stevenson – Bass and Craig Taborn – keyboard.

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The Stone in August

Shows coming next month to New York’s Stone:

August 2009 at the Stone curated by Tyshawn Sorey

8/1 Saturday (KR)
8 pm
Johannes Lauer/Tyshawn Sorey Duo Plus
Johannes Lauer (trombone, compositions) Tyshawn Sorey (drums, piano, compositions) plus special guests

10 pm
First Meeting
Ingrid Laubrock (saxophone) Kris Davis (piano) Tyshawn Sorey (drums) Mat Maneri (viola) Thomas Morgan (bass)

8/2 Sunday (NYYT)
8 and 10 pm
Ingrid Laubrock/Tyshawn Sorey/Kris Davis
Ingrid Laubrock (saxophone, compositions) Tyshawn Sorey (drums, compositions) Kris Davis (piano, compositions)

SPECIAL MONDAY NIGHT CONCERT
LAURIE ANDERSON AND COLIN STETSON
Each set will be about 40 minutes in duration.
A special set of music by the inimitable Laurie Anderson on keyboards, electronics, violin and voice and Colin Stetson on saxophone.

8/3 Monday (CB)
8 and 10 pm
Laurie Anderson and Colin Stetson
Laurie Anderson (electronics, violin) Colin Stetson (saxophones, clarinet, flute)
TWENTY DOLLARS

8/4 Tuesday (SK)
8 pm
Kris Davis
Kris Davis (piano)

10 pm
Johannes Lauer Quartet
Johannes Lauer (trombone, compositions) Tony Malaby (saxophone) Drew Gress (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (drums)

8/5 Wednesday (DD)
8 pm
Weiss-Sorey Duo
Dan Weiss (drums) Tyshawn Sorey (drums)

10 pm
Tyshawn Sorey Guitar Trio
Todd Neufeld (guitar) Thomas Morgan (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (drums, compositions)
A celebration of their forthcoming 482 Music release “Koan.” FIFTEEN DOLLARS

8/6 Thursday (DD)
8 pm
Oblique – I
Tyshawn Sorey (drums, compositions) Pete Robbins (saxophone) John Escreet (piano) Todd Neufeld (guitar) Thomas Morgan (bass)

10 pm
Oblique – II
Tyshawn Sorey (drums, compositions) Pete Robbins (saxophone) John Escreet (piano) Todd Neufeld (guitar) Thomas Morgan (bass)

8/7 Friday (DD)
8 pm
Oblique – III
Tyshawn Sorey (drums, compositions) Pete Robbins (saxophone) John Escreet (piano) Todd Neufeld (guitar) Thomas Morgan (bass)

10 pm
Mushin
Tyshawn Sorey (piano, compositions) Chris Tordini (bass) Thomas Morgan (bass) John McLellan (drums)

8/8 Saturday (RK)
8 pm
Jesse Elder + Aya Nishina Duo
Jesse Elder, Aya Nishina (piano four hands)

10 pm
ALO
Jesse Elder, Aya Nishina (piano four hands) James Brendan Adamson (live electronics) Ned Rothenberg (shakuhachi, clarinet, saxophone) Mat Maneri (viola)
The innovative four hand piano duet ALO (the Latin word meaning to nourish, cherish, support, and sustain) is a collaborative project between long time friends Jesse Elder and Aya Nishina. ALO focuses on generating a new repertoire for 4 hand piano duo through improvisations, compositions and arrangements. The duo will be creating a radical sound sculpture together with live electronics by the great James Brendan Adamson and with woodwindist Ned Rothenberg as part of their program.

8/9 Sunday (BS)
8 pm
Martin Urbach
Max Siegel (bass trombone, tuba) Jesse Lewis (guitar) Martin Urbach (drums, compositions)

10 pm
Matana Roberts
Matana Roberts (woodwinds) Mary Halvorson (guitar) Ches Smith (drums)

8/11 Tuesday (JM)
8 pm
Terrence McManus’ “The Wealthy Industrialists”
Terrence McManus (guitar, compositions) Tim Berne (alto saxophone) Herb Robertson (trumpet) Mark Helias (bass) Gerry Hemmingway (drums, percussion)
Initially formed in 2008 as a contemporary chamber trio featuring Terrence McManus, Tim Berne, and Herb Robertson, The Wealthy Industrialists is now expanded to a quintet and will be exploring a suite of newly rearranged material, specifically for this performance. While the suite will consist of some newly composed music, it will also feature some material composed almost a decade ago, which hasn’t been performed in many years.

10 pm
Vijay Iyer + High Priest
Vijay Iyer (piano, electronics) High Priest (voice, electronics)

8/12 Wednesday (JM)
8 pm
BOMB-X
Nicolas Letman-Burtinovic (bass, compositions) Samuel Blais, Masa Yamamoto (saxophones) Art Hirahara (piano) Ziv Ravitz (drums)

10 pm
ExPosed Blues Duo meets Tomas Ulrich
Fay Victor (voice) Anders Nilsson (electric guitar) Tomas Ulrich (cello)

8/13 Thursday (NYYT)
8 pm
Craig Taborn
Craig Taborn (piano)

10 pm
Dan Weiss Trio
Jacob Sacks (piano) Thomas Morgan (bass) Dan Weiss (drims, compositions)

8/14 Friday (JC)
8 pm
Gerry Hemmingway Solo
Gerry Hemmingway (drums, percussion)

10 pm
Wayne Krantz & Mark Guiliana Duo
Wayne Krantz (guitar) Mark Guiliana (drums, percussion)

8/15 Saturday
8 pm
Pete Robbins and siLENT Z
Pete Robbins (saxophone, electronics) Jesse Neuman (cornet, electronics) Mike Gamble (guitar) Thomas Morgan (bass) Tommy Crane (drums)

10 pm
Ben Gerstein Collective
Ben Gerstein (trombone) Tony Malaby (saxophone) Jacob Sacks (piano) Jacob Garchik (laptop, accordion) Thomas Morgan (bass) Dan Weiss (drums)
Improvisations…

8/16 Sunday (MP)
8 pm
BassDrumBone
Gerry Hemmingway (drums, percussion) Ray Anderson (trombone) Mark Helias (bass)

10 pm
Peripatetics
Liberty Ellman (guitar) Vijay Iyer (piano)
Fifteen years in the making.

8/18 Tuesday (CB)
8 pm
Joe Albano’s “The Meanderthals”
Joe Albano (woodwinds, compositions) Steve Ruel (saxophones) Aki Ishiguro (guitar) Nick Jozwiak (bass) Dave Cole (drums)

10 pm
Steve Ruel: Untitled Composition (2009)
Steve Ruel (alto saxophone, oboe) Michael Sperone (vibraphone) Tyshawn Sorey (piano) TBA (french horn)

8/19 Wednesday (MP)
8 and 10 pm
Fieldwork
Steve Lehman (alto saxophone, compositions) Tyshawn Sorey (drums, compositions) Vijay Iyer (piano, compositions)
A collaborative group. This is the trio’s first performance since last Fall, and they will be premiering new compositions during the set.

8/20 Thursday
8 pm
Pascal Niggenkemper Trio
Pascal Niggenkemper (bass, compositions) Robin Verheyan (saxophone) Tyshawn Sorey (piano, drums)

10 pm
Okkyung Lee, Mat Maneri, and Tyshawn Sorey
Okkyung Lee (cello) Mat Maneri (viola) Tyshawn Sorey (piano, drums)

8/21 Friday (KR)
8 pm
Robbins-Pavone-Sorey
Pete Robbins (alto saxophone) Mario Pavone (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (drums)

10 pm
Tom Rainey with Ingrid Laubrock and Mary Halvorson
Tom Rainey (drums) Ingrid Laubrock (saxophone) Mary Halvorson (guitar)

8/22 Saturday
8 and 10 pm
Mario Pavone Quartet
Mario Pavone (bass, compositions) Tony Malaby (saxophone) Dave Ballou (trumpet) Tyshawn Sorey (drums)

8/23 Sunday
8 and 10 pm
JOHN ZORN IMPROV NIGHT–A Stone Benefit
John Zorn (saxophone), Tyshawn Sorey (drums, piano, trombone), and many special guests
Please come out and support the Stone!

TWENTY DOLLARS

8/25 Tuesday (BS)
8 pm
“Crash, Braaaww, Thud, Aaaaah”
Fay Victor (voice, compositions) Tyshawn Sorey (percussion) with special guest Roswell Rudd (trombone)
New York debut performance of this trio! TWENTY DOLLARS

10 pm
In Medias Res
Tyshawn Sorey (drums, composition) Nate Wooley (trumpet) Steve Ruel (woodwinds) Terrence McManus (guitar) Christopher Tordini (bass)
A concert-length composition composed during the spring of 2009. This will be the first and only performance of this composition for the year.

THREE SPECIAL NIGHTS
WU-WEI
featuring Todd Neufeld, Cory Smythe, Thomas Morgan, Christopher Tordini, Ben Gerstein, Masabumi Kikuchi and Tyshawn Sorey
Composer amd multi-instrumentalist Tyshawn Sorey presents his long form composition Wu-Wei, originally commissioned by Roulette and supported by the Jerome Foundation and the Van Lier Fellowship.

8/26 Wednesday (NYYT)
8 pm
Wu-Wei: Chapter One
Cory Smythe (piano) Christopher Tordini (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (composition)

10 pm
Wu-Wei: Chapter Two
Todd Neufeld (guitar) Ben Gerstein (trombone) Cory Smythe (piano) Tyshawn Sorey (drums, compositions)

8/27 Thursday
8 pm
Wu-Wei: Chapter Three
Ben Gerstein (trombone) Cory Smythe (piano) Thomas Morgan (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (drums, compositions)

10 pm
Wu-Wei: Chapter Four
Cory Smythe (piano) Christopher Tordini (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (drums, composition)

8/28 Friday
8 pm
Wu-Wei: Chapter Five
Todd Neufeld (guitar) Cory Smythe (piano) Thomas Morgan (bass) Christopher Tordini (bass) Ben Gerstein (trombone) Tyshawn Sorey (drums, compositions)

10 pm
Wu-Wei: Postlude
Todd Neufeld (guitar) Masabumi Kikuchi (piano) Thomas Morgan (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (drums)
First performance with this improvising quartet in nearly a year! FIFTEEN DOLLARS

8/29 Saturday
8 pm
Thomas Morgan
Thomas Morgan (bass, acoustic guitar)
Performing compositions and improvisations for solo bass and solo guitar.

10 pm
Kyle Quass Quartet
Kyle Quass (trumpet) Cory Smythe (piano) Thomas Morgan (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (drums)

8/30 Sunday (TD)
8 pm
An Evening with Steve Lehman and Craig Taborn
Steve Lehman (saxophone, live electronics) Craig Taborn (piano, live electronics)

10 pm
An Evening with Steve Lehman and Craig Taborn
Craig Taborn (piano) Steve Lehman (sopranino and alto saxophones)

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Jazz Listings From The New York Times

Paal Nilssen-Love
Image via Wikipedia

From the Times:

AB BAARS TRIO WITH KEN VANDERMARK (Sunday) Ab Baars, a saxophonist and clarinetist prominent on the robust Dutch jazz scene, has a new album, “Goofy June Bug” (Wig 15), featuring this trio — with Wilbert de Joode on bass and Martin van Duynhoven on drums — along with Mr. Vandermark, a Chicago multireedist. The same coterie arrives here after more than two weeks on the road, which ensures only the most cohesive brand of mayhem. At 7 p.m., Joe’s Pub, at the Public Theater, 425 Lafayette Street, at Astor Place, East Village, (212) 598-7100, joespub.com; cover, $20, with a two-drink minimum. (Chinen)

ESP-DISK LIVE (Tuesday) ESP-Disk, an important avant-garde label of the 1960s, recently resumed production, selling its visionary catalog through retailers and online at espdisk.com. This showcase begins with a set by the percussionist Paul Thornton (at 10 p.m.), and continues with a performance by the Ras Ensemble, a chamberlike group led by the saxophonist Ras Moshe (at 11). Bowery Poetry Club, 308 Bowery Street, near Bleecker Street, East Village, (212) 614-0505, bowerypoetry.com; $10. (Chinen)

PAUL MOTIAN OCTET + 1 (Friday through Sunday) A luminous and mysterious post-bop ensemble that consists of two contrasting pairs of improvisers (the saxophonists Chris Cheek and Bill McHenry, and the guitarists Steve Cardenas and Tim Miller); a couple of welcome stabilizers (Jerome Harris and Thomas Morgan, both bassists); a pair of wild cards (the violist Mat Maneri and the pianist Jacob Sacks); and a wily mastermind (Mr. Motian, on drums). At 9 and 11 p.m., Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, at 11th Street, West Village. (Chinen)

OPSVIK & JENNINGS (Tuesday) The bassist Eivind Opsvik and the guitarist Aaron Jennings have maintained this intelligent electro-acoustic duo collaboration for a handful of years, releasing two strong albums on the Norwegian label Rune Grammofon. Their live chemistry relies partly on the terse contributions of the trombonist and keyboardist Brian Drye, the trumpeter Rich Johnson and the drummer Dave Christian. From 9 to 11 p.m., Nublu, 62 Avenue C, between Fourth and Fifth Streets, East Village, nublu.net; free before 10 p.m.; $5 after. (Chinen)

THE THING (Thursday) This rugged Scandinavian collective — with Mats Gustafsson on reeds, Ingebrigt Haker Flaten on bass, and Paal Nilssen-Love on drums — specializes in convulsive improvisation, drawing about equally from the protocols of free jazz and punk rock. Here the band shares billing with Sparks, a duo made up of the trumpeter Peter Evans and the bassist Tom Blancarte; and Little Women, a noise-jazz Brooklyn quartet. At 9 p.m., Zebulon, 258 Wythe Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, (718) 218-6934, myspace.com/zebuloncafeconcert; no cover.

YEAH YEAH RECORDS AND FRIENDS FESTIVAL (Friday) This series, running every Friday through the month’s end, features artists affiliated with the ruggedly independent Yeah Yeah label. Among them are the guitarist Khabu Doug Young, who performs here at 8 p.m.; a duo featuring the pianist Jesse Stacken and the trumpeter Kirk Knuffke, at 9; and at 10, a trio with the saxophonist Andrew Bishop, the drummer Gerald Cleaver and the bassist Tim Flood. I-Beam Music, 168 Seventh Street, Gowanus, Brooklyn, ibeambrooklyn.com; $10. (Chinen)

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Jazz Listings From The New York Times

In the Times:

BISHOP-CLEAVER-FLOOD (Tuesday) As on a recent album, “Time and Imaginary Time” (Envoi), the saxophonist Andrew Bishop engages in an equal exchange with the drummer Gerald Cleaver and the bassist Tim Flood, expanding compositional frames and exploring open space. At 10 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; $10. (Chinen)20090409

SYLVIE COURVOISIER AND MARK FELDMAN (Wednesday) Ms. Courvoisier, a pianist and composer, pursues intricacy; Mr. Feldman, a violinist, favors intensity. They have recorded together as a duo, which will be their format for the early set here, at 8 p.m. For the later set, at 10, they will enlist the bassist Eivind Opsvik and the drummer Gerry Hemingway. The Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; $10 per set. (Chinen)20090409

MARK HELIAS QUARTET (Saturday) Mark Helias is a bassist of adventurous temperament and great rhythmic assurance, as he demonstrates in a band with two longtime associates, the trombonist Ray Anderson and the tenor saxophonist Ellery Eskelin, and a dynamic younger colleague, the drummer Gerald Cleaver. At 10 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; $10. (Chinen)20090409

INGEBRIGT HAKER FLATEN (Friday, Sunday and Monday) Ingebrigt Haker Flaten is a Norwegian bassist, and one of the bigger fish in the pool of European free-improvised music. He’s staging a small-scale New York takeover this week, playing in two different places on Friday: first at Monkeytown (with the saxophonist Hakon Kornstad) and then at the 5C Café (with the cellist Daniel Levin). On Sunday he will appear in Double Heart, a group led by the saxophonist Tony Malaby; on Monday he will work in yet another duo, with the trumpeter Jawwaad Taylor. Friday at 7:30 p.m., Monkeytown, 58 North Third Street, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, (718) 384-1369; monkeytownhq.com; cover, $8, with a $10 minimum. Friday at 10 p.m., 5C Cafe, 68 Avenue C, at Fifth Street, East Village, (212) 477-5993, 5ccc.com; no cover, with a $5 minimum. Sunday at 8:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village, (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; cover, $10, with a one-drink minimum. Monday at 9 p.m., the Local 269, 269 East Houston Street, at Suffolk Street, Lower East Side, rucma.org; $10; $7 for students. (Chinen)20090409

PAUL MOTIAN OCTET + 1 (Tuesday through Thursday) A luminous and mysterious post-bop ensemble that consists of two contrasting pairs of improvisers (the saxophonists Chris Cheek and Bill McHenry, and the guitarists Steve Cardenas and Tim Miller); a couple of welcome stabilizers (Jerome Harris and Thomas Morgan, both bassists); a pair of wild cards (the violist Mat Maneri and the pianist Jacob Sacks); and a wily mastermind (Mr. Motian, on drums). (Through April 19.) At 9 and 11 p.m., Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, at 11th Street, West Village, (212) 255-4037, villagevanguard.com; cover, $20, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen)20090409

? SKIRL PARTY V (Saturday) Skirl, a Brooklyn-based label with a ruggedly experimental streak, celebrates its fifth anniversary with four bands from its roster: H-Alpha, an electro-acoustic trio with a new album called “Red Sphere”; the avant-folkish duo composed of the guitarist Mary Halvorson and the violist Jessica Pavone; the New Mellow Edwards, led by the trombonist Curtis Hasselbring; and Andrew D’Angelo’s Gay Disco Trio, led by Mr. D’Angelo, a strenuously upbeat multireedist. At 7:30 p.m., the Bell House, 149 Seventh Street, Gowanus, Brooklyn, (718) 643-6510, thebellhouseny.com; $12. 20090409

KEVIN TKACZ’S LETHAL OBJECTION (Tuesday) The bassist Kevin Tkacz (pronounced tax) features his own compositions in this adventurous and boisterous ensemble, with the trumpeter Ralph Alessi, the pianist Angelica Sanchez and, in his first outing with the group, the drummer Gerry Hemingway. At 7 p.m., Barbès, 376 Ninth Street, at Sixth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn, (347) 422-0248, barbesbrooklyn.com; $10 suggested donation. (Chinen)20090409

TWICE TOLD TALES (Thursday) This expressive quartet, conversing mainly in terms of free improvisation, consists of the tenor and soprano saxophonists Tony Malaby and Louis Belogenis; the perceptive bassist John Hébert; and the ever-ebullient drummer Joey Baron. At 8 and 10 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; $10 per set. (Chinen)

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Jazz Listings From The New York Times

American Jazz musician and composer Mat Maneri.
Image via Wikipedia

From the Times:

GERALD CLEAVER (Tuesday) Dealing less in rhythm than in pulse, Mr. Cleaver’s drumming perfectly suits the fluid requirements of jazz’s post-everything avant-garde. He leads two strong bands here, beginning (at 8 p.m.) with Violet Hour, which features a front line of the trumpeter Jeremy Pelt and the saxophonists J. D. Allen and Andrew Bishop. The second group (at 10) is Uncle June, his more free-form-leaning outfit with the violist Mat Maneri, the saxophonist Tony Malaby and others. At the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; cover, $10 per set. (Chinen)

SYLVIE COURVOISIER TRIO (Sunday) The pianist Sylvie Courvoisier typically pursues a shimmering kind of tonal friction, and in this trio she has the right partners for it: John Hebert, a sensitive bassist, and Gerald Cleaver, a supple drummer. At 8 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; cover, $10. (Chinen)

? BILL FRISELL, RON CARTER, PAUL MOTIAN (Tuesday through Thursday) A few years ago this all-star triumvirate released an album on Nonesuch that felt tantalizingly unfinished. Now Mr. Frisell (on guitar), Mr. Carter (on bass) and Mr. Motian (on drums) regroup for a weeklong engagement, taking long strides across a terrain that encompasses both spooky originals and heartland standards. (Through Jan. 11.) At 8 and 10:30 p.m., Blue Note, 131 West Third Street, West Village, (212) 475-8592, bluenote.net; cover, $35 at tables, $20 at the bar, with a $5 minimum. (Chinen)

? DAVE HOLLAND OCTET (Wednesday and Thursday) On “Pass It On” (Emarcy), his crisply energetic recent album, the bassist Dave Holland unveils a batch of compositions for a high-polish sextet. Here he expands to eight pieces but calls on some of the same musicians, employing the same stout resourcefulness as an arranger and composer. (Through Jan. 11.) At 8:30 and 11 p.m., Birdland, 315 West 44th Street, Clinton, (212) 581-3080, birdlandjazz.com; cover, $40 and $30, with a $10 minimum.

? NICOLE MITCHELL’S SONIC PROJECTIONS (Friday and Saturday) More than a serious and soulful flutist, Nicole Mitchell, from Chicago, organizes her music with a high degree of conceptual savvy. Here she introduces two editions of a project called Sonic Projections. The first, on Friday, includes the tenor saxophonist David Boykin, the pianist Vijay Iyer and the drummer Chad Taylor; the second, on Saturday, features the guitarist Mary Halvorson in place of Mr. Iyer. Friday at 10 p.m., Saturday at 8 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; cover, $10. (Chinen)

? MARIO PAVONE (Friday and Wednesday) Mr. Pavone is a bassist and composer with a strong affinity for post-bop experimentation, and in his own music he often maps out a layered topography. On Friday he revisits the landscape of his album “Deez to Blues” (Playscape), with Steven Bernstein on trumpet and Charles Burnham on violin, among others. On Wednesday he leads his Double Tenor Quintet, featured on a more recent album, “Ancestors” (Playscape); the two tenors in question are Tony Malaby and Jimmy Greene. Friday at 9 and 10:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village, (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; cover, $10, with a one-drink minimum. Wednesday at 8:30 and 10:30 p.m., Iridium, 1650 Broadway, at 51st Street, (212) 582-2121, iridiumjazzclub.com; cover, $25, with a $15 minimum.

MIKE REED AND JEFF PARKER (Wednesday and Thursday) Mr. Reed, a drummer, composer and festival presenter from Chicago, released two strong records last year on the 482 Music label, each a reflection of his inclusive spirit of modernity. Here he teams up with Mr. Parker, a guitarist of similar temperament and perspective, for a blend of improvised and premeditated duets. At 10 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; cover, $10. (Chinen)

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Maneri and Peterson at BARBÈS

American Jazz musician and composer Mat Maneri.
Image via Wikipedia

Mat Maneri and Randy Peterson play BARBÈS next month.

What: Mat Maneri (Viola), Randy Peterson (Drums)
When: October 9th, 2008, 10pm
Where: Barbes, 376 9th street , Brooklyn
Cost: $10

Mat Maneri and Randy Peterson will play at Barbes, Brooklyn on Thursday, October 9th, 10pm. These two renowned, maverick musicians draw from the essentials in historic and modern jazz without reverting to nostalgia or reproducing atmospheric dissonances. Their unique partnership and approach to music has developed from over 20 years of playing together as a duo and in various trio’s and quartets most notably with legendary saxophonist Joe Maneri.

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