Coming to Ars Nova Workshop

From Philly’s Ars Nova Workshop:

Sunday, November 29, 2009 – 8:00pm
Ellery Eskelin-Erik Deutsch-Allison Miller Trio

Venue:
International House Philadelphia
3701 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104 Map
Price: $12 General Admission Buy Tickets

Ellery Eskelin (born 1959) was raised in Baltimore and began playing the tenor saxophone at age ten, inspired by his mother “Bobbie Lee” who played Hammond B3 organ professionally in the early sixties. In 1983 Eskelin moved to New York City and in 1987 began recording with the cooperative group Joint Venture which also began his exposure on the European international touring circuit.

Saturday, December 5, 2009 – 8:00pm
Bill Dixon with Rob Mazurek’s Exploding Star Orchestra
Anti-Jazz: The New Thing Revisited

Venue:
International House Philadelphia
3701 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104 Map
Price: $20 Buy Tickets

A crucial figure in the development of Free Jazz, trumpeter Bill Dixon (b. 1925) was first associated with the ensembles of Cecil Taylor and Archie Shepp, and was one of the main architects of the Jazz Composers Guild. In 1964, he organized the October Revolution in Jazz – The New Thing’s equivalent to the Armory Show – introducing Free Jazz to a broader audience. In the late 60s he devoted himself to teaching, creating the Black Music Division at Bennington College, VT in 1973.

Sunday, December 6, 2009 – 8:00pm
Claudia Quintet 1

Venue:
International House Philadelphia
3701 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104 Map
Price: $12 General Admission Buy Tickets

“This is a true ensemble from top to bottom, a sonic equivalent to a hand-woven tapestry…Impressive.” -DownBeat

Monday, December 7, 2009 – 8:00pm
Wooley-Yeh-Corsano Trio Rempis-Rosaly Duo

Venue:
International House Philadelphia
3701 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104 Map
Price: $10 General Admission Buy Tickets

Please join us for what is sure to be a night of incendiary music. Two very unique improvising groups together for a special one-night extravaganza.
Wooley-Yeh-Corsano Trio
Rempis-Rosaly Duo

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Emily Hay Live in July

From Emily Hay:

Saturday, July 11, 2009 8:00pm at Cafe Metropol
923 E. Third Street, Los Angeles, CA 90013
http://www.cafemetropol.com/
MOTOKO HONDA (piano, hammond organ)with EMILY HAY (flutes, vocals,
electronics), MATT PIPER (computers, keybards) and KAI KUROSAWA (warr
guitar)
PLAYING VITDM (VERY INTENSE, TWISTED DANCE MUSIC)

Sunday, July 12, 2009 9:00PM at Echo Curio
1519 Sunset Boulevard, Echo Park, CA 90026
DOTTIE GROSSMAN (poetry) and MICHAEL VLATKOVICH (trombones)
EMILY HAY (flutes vocals and electronics) and FRIENDS (tba)
ANNA HOMLER (voice, toys, sound art) and FRIENDS (tba)

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New on Moon June Records

Moon June Records has a number of new releases out.

COPERNICUS – Disappearance

The longtime musical director of Copernicus’ assemblage is the Irish keyboardist and composer Pierce Turner, long resident in New York City. His fellow countryman, Black 47 leader Larry Kirwan is one of the album’s four guitarists, along with Mike Fazio, César Aragundi and Bob Hoffnar. Other musicians appearing on the album are: Raimundo Penaforte (violin, acoustic guitar, percussion, vocals), Fred Parcells (trombone), Rob Thomas (violin), Matty Fillou (sax), Marvin Wright (electric bass guitar and additional electric guitar), George Rush (tuba, acoustic and electric bass), Thomas Hamlin (drums & percussion) and Mark Brotter (drums & percussion).

Is Copernicus celebrating The Universe, or observing its collapse? This ageless sage orates like a windswept preacher who has just witnessed visions of the apocalypse. Turner is rolling out swathes of Gothic Hammond organ, leading the ensemble in their surging accumulations. A bassline walk begins, a slide guitar floats, a trombone starts up its funereal sway. Copernicus declaims, and almost rants. He’s taking things (matter) to the precipice, as he deals with the nature of subatomic particles. A chorus of voices from the band fill the edges around the congregation’s void. Does Copernicus herald doom or salvation?

BORIS SAVOLDELLI & ELLIOTT SHARP – Protoplasmic

Here are two artists who share a profound facility for refined versatility. Each of them has built up a career around several varied (yet complementary) disciplines, quite possibly ensnaring completely different audiences on different days of the week. The Italian singer Boris Savoldelli teeters perfectly between a true pop sensibility and an anarchic improvisational wildness. He can craft overdubbed layers of sheer melodic charm, forging an experimental approachability, or he can cast off all inhibitions and launch into the completely unshackled heights of free-form spontaneity. This is a man who is comfortable with the advanced avant garde techniques of diplophony, triplophony, flutophony and criptomelody! In Italy, Savoldelli studied operatic vocal techniques with Simona Marcello and, more recently, in New York, he’s refined his art with singers Jay Clayton and Mark Murphy. Savoldelli is also a member of the innovative avant jazz-rock combo SADO, and released the acclaimed solo album Insanology in 2008. This was a feast of inspired vocal-orchestral loop-layering, featuring a guest appearance by US guitarist Marc Ribot. Elliott Sharp is also a multi-faceted player, his guitar masterfully extending along the perimeters of jazz, improvisation, electronica, rock’n’roll, rarefied new music composition and the grime-slogging blues. All of these zones are inhabited with complete confidence and virtuoso wit. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, he’s long been identified with the eclectic downtown scene of New York City. Mainly known as an electric and acoustic guitarist, Sharp is also highly articulate on his armoury of reed instruments (saxophone, clarinet), as well as screaming out with the sliding strings of his trusty pedal steel guitar.

simakDIALOG – Demi Masa

This is the fifth album from Indonesian progressive jazz ensemble simakDialog. Led by keyboardist and composer Riza Arshad, the band also features guitarist Tohpati and bassist Adhitya Pratama, working alongside the twinned percussion thrust of Endang Ramdan and Erlan Suwardana. This latter pair are specialists in traditional Sundanese kendang drumming. Arshad’s compositional approach opens up from a jazz-rock palette, but his Fender Rhodes electric piano is clearly influenced by the crisp ring and shimmer of the Indonesian gamelan’s array of gongs, metallophones and double-headed drums. We can immediately hear the similarities between the keyboard’s percussive crackle and the sharp detonations of tunefully struck metal. The percussionists soon enter, clattering out their heavily organic patterns with roundly slapped skins, shaker bells and handclaps. Arshad frequently pushes his solos (or are they ongoing themes?) up to continually higher levels, urging repeated climaxes as each piece steadily amasses intensity. Tohpati is also attracted to resonant trebly zones, journeying from acoustic delicacy to a subtly distorted friction. The guitarist’s presence has a significance beyond his role on this album, as Tohpati is one of the Indonesian music scene’s most successful (and ubiquitous) players. Another element is tipped in later, with the percussionists chanting along to emphasise their dense structures. Arshad might recline in a hazy contemplation, but it doesn’t take him long to develop an insistent pulse, invariably reaching a frenzied state. There’s a clear recalling of the classic moves made by Chick Corea and Terje Rypdal in the 1970s, but this is laced with authentic gamelan elements utilised as part of this jazz-rock vocabulary. The result sounds both natural and fully integrated. This a particular realm that couldn’t be reached either by Western progressives or a traditional gamelan ensemble. The simakDialog involves a unique combination of both spheres, without making the commercially tempting mistake of cultural dilution.

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Jazz Listings From The New York Times

Jazz in the Times:

A BODY WITHOUT ORGANS (Sunday) This metaphysically named series, held every other Sunday in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, reflects the rugged ideals of its organizer, the drummer Mike Pride. In a late set here, at 10:30 p.m., Mr. Pride digs in with the German clarinetist Uli Kempendorf and the Norwegian bassist Eivind Opsvik. An earlier set, at 9:30, will feature a group led by the drummer Jeff Davis, with Mr. Opsvik, the multireedist Oscar Noriega and the guitarist Jonathan Goldberger. At CoCo 66, 66 Greenpoint Avenue, Brooklyn, (718) 389-7392, coco66.com; cover, $6. 20090312

FONDA-STEVENS GROUP (Monday) This long-running free-jazz outfit, led by the bassist Joe Fonda and the pianist Michael Jefry Stevens, previews material from a new album, “Memphis” (Playscape); the other members in the group are the trumpeter Herb Robertson and the drummer Harvey Sorgen. At 8:30 p.m., Roulette, 20 Greene Street, near Canal Street, SoHo, (212) 219-8242, roulette.org; $15; $10 for students, 60+ and those under 30. 20090312

THE LANGUAGE OF (Friday) The baritone saxophonist Charles Evans and the trumpeter Peter Evans jointly lead this freethinking young post-bop ensemble, which released an album a few years ago pointedly titled “No Relation.” Before the group’s featured slot here, at 10 p.m., Charles Evans will play a 9 p.m. duo set with the pianist Neil Shah, a longtime musical acquaintance. At I-Beam Music, 168 Seventh Street, Gowanus, Brooklyn, ibeambrooklyn.com; suggested donation, $10. 20090312

TONY MALABY QUARTET (Friday and Saturday) Tony Malaby, a tenor saxophonist equally capable of focused tension and wild abandon, enlists experienced partners in this quartet: the trumpeter Ralph Alessi, the bassist John Hebert and the drummer Billy Drummond. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village, (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; cover, $10, with a one-drink minimum. 20090312

TOM RAINEY, INGRID LAUBROCK, MARY HALVORSON (Wednesday) Mr. Rainey, a starkly suggestive drummer, teams up here with Ms. Laubrock, a German-born, British-based tenor and soprano saxophonist, and Ms. Halvorson, a guitarist with a sharp-splintered but flexible attack. Their core purpose is a subversive but graceful whole-group abstraction. At 8 and 10 p.m., Barbès, 376 Ninth Street, at Sixth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn, (347) 422-0248, barbesbrooklyn.com; cover, $10. 20090312

THE REFUGE TRIO (Tuesday) Throughout its recent self-titled release on the Winter & Winter label, this ensemble — Theo Bleckmann on vocals, Gary Versace on Hammond B-3 organ, and John Hollenbeck on drums — makes shrewdly atmospheric use of a distinctive textural palette. The group was named after a Joni Mitchell song, but its repertory extends to originals (by all three members), jazz standards (Monk, Coltrane) and farther-out fare (Allan Holdsworth). At 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Jazz Standard, 116 East 27th Street, Manhattan, (212) 576-2232, jazzstandard.net; cover, $20. 20090312

THE THROES/FLOW TRIO (Monday) The Throes are a free-jazz outfit spearheaded by two inventive horn players, the trumpeter Nate Wooley and the cornetist Taylor Ho Bynum. Flow Trio, a bit more established, features Louie Belogenis on tenor saxophone, Joe Morris on bass, and Charles Downs on drums; the group has a stark but rewarding new album, “Rejuvenation” (ESP-Disk). At 7 and 8:30 p.m., the Local 269, 269 East Houston Street, at Suffolk Street, Lower East Side, rucma.org; $10; $7 for students.

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