Coming in Early 2010 from EMF Productions

From New York’s EMF Productions:

Iannis Xenakis:
Composer, Architect, Visionary
October, 2009—March, 2010

Electronic Music Foundation and other organizations in New York present a series of extraordinary events showcasing the visionary interdisciplinary practices of this revolutionary composer/architect.

In collaboration with Goethe Institute NYC
Unsound Festival
February 2—10, 2010

A first for New York City, Unsound NY will showcase European experimental and electronic music, as well as related visual arts, including the Warhol Series. Details coming soon.

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Cornelius Dufallo Sings the Fiddle Electric at the Stone

From NYTimes.com:

As a member of the enterprising new-music ensembles Ne(x)tworks and Ethel, the violinist Cornelius Dufallo runs into plenty of composers. He has coaxed new solo works from some and taken up older scores by others. He is also a composer himself: “Dream Streets,” his new CD (for Innova), is devoted to his own imaginative works for violin and electronics.

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Mario Davidovsky: Celebrating One of the Synthethizer’s Pioneers at Merkin Hall

From NYTimes.com:

In the early 1960s composers who had been fascinated with electronic music in the ’50s were seeking ways to combine the synthetic sounds they were producing on room-size computers and early synthesizers with the more familiar timbres of acoustic instruments. The Argentine-born American composer Mario Davidovsky, then in his late 20s, was a star of this movement: his “Synchronisms No. 1,” for flute and electronic sound, appeared in 1962, and new installments turned up periodically through 2006, when he wrote “Synchronisms No. 12,” for clarinet and tape.

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ICE does Saariaho chamber works proud

A recent ICE Chicago concert is reviewed:

Chicago has yet to hear any of Kaija Saariaho’s large-scale works, which is a great pity. At least attention is being paid to the instrumental output of this gifted and prolific Finnish composer, a world-class original who just completed the first of two residencies she will undertake this season at Northwestern University’s Henry and Leigh Bienen School of Music.

The Museum of Contemporary Art took up the Saariaho cause Thursday night when it presented an entire program of her chamber works as performed by the brilliant Chicago- and New York-based International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE). The crowd received it with rapt appreciation.

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ICE Returns To The MCA

The Chicagoist has the scoop on the International Contemporary Ensemble:

Fans of sonic experimentation will want to clear their schedules November 19 for the return of the Chicago/NYC-based International Contemporary Ensemble to the MCA for a rare performance of Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho’s work. Brad Lubman will conduct and Saariaho herself will supervise the group’s rehearsals and make a guest appearance at the concert to field audience questions.

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Sitting in a room with experimental music professor Alvin Lucier

An interview and profile of Lucier from the Wesleyan Argus:

Professor Alvin Lucier may be the most famous professor here that you’ve never heard of. Through his groundbreaking compositions, Lucier has become a world-renowned composer and is hailed as a genius in the experimental music genre.

However, Lucier’s path to experimental music was not a planned one. Though he grew up in a musical house dreaming of becoming a composer, he was not initially inspired by experimental music.

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Cleveland contemporary-music ensemble No Exit ready to introduce itself

Lutos?awski
Image via Wikipedia

From cleveland.com:

No Exit New Music Ensemble will make its debut with free concerts at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20 at Cleveland State University’s Drinko Recital Hall, 2001 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, and 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 21 at the Barking Spider Tavern, 11310 Juniper Rd., Cleveland.

Founded by composer Timothy Beyer, the core group comprises pianist Nicholas Underhill, violinist Cara Tweed, violist Tom Bowling and cellist Nick Diodore.

Their inaugural program will include Witold Lutoslawski‘s “Sacher Variation” for cello, the Adagio from Zoltan Kodaly’s Duo for Violin and Cello, works by Underhill and Beyer and new pieces by Al Kovach and James Praznik.

According to Beyer, “Our mission is to promote and perform contemporary concert music with an eye towards the avant-garde. We will have a strong focus on living composers and are particularly interested in championing the music of talented young composers who have not yet received much exposure.”

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Dal Niente to Perform Saariaho, Yim, Broberg, Lindberg

From Dal Niente:

Layers and Threads–Thursday, December 3 – 8:00pm – $10/5
Immanuel Lutheran Church
1500 W Elmdale Dr.
Chicago, IL 60660

Featured composers: Kaija Saariaho, Jay Alan Yim, Kirsten Broberg, Magnus Lindberg
Featured performers: Gareth Davis, clarinet; J. Austin Wulliman, violin

Layers and Threads explores timbre and texture within both traditionally and unconventionally
structured works. Virtuoso Amsterdam-based clarinetist Gareth Davis joins the group for a
performance of Magnus Lindberg’s Ablauf for clarinet and percussion, a wild and untamed work that dances with fast-flowing polyphony in the clarinet. ensemble dal niente’s principal violinist J. Austin Wulliman will be joined by Notre Dame professor Daniel Schlosberg for the American premiere of Kaija Saariaho’s new work for violin and piano, Calices, and the world premiere of founding composer Kirsten Broberg’s Origins involves a mix of ensembles with guest soloist Gareth Davis featured in the final movement. The U.S. premiere of Northwestern University professor Jay Alan Yim’s Songs in Memory of a Circle simultaneously layers three individual sections of the larger work and is coupled with a video installation by Northwestern professor Marlena Novak.

Founded in 2004 ensemble dal niente performs a broad range of 20th- and 21st- century music for enthusiastic audiences across the country. Through concerts, commissions and educational activities, we explore the wealth and diversity of music composed in the past century — from the European avant-garde, to American high modernism, to styles influenced by popular music and jazz. The ensemble is comprised of young artists and international virtuosos who bring this challenging repertoire to life with enthusiasm and devotion.

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ICE Cofounder Claire Chase Steps Out With Debut Solo Recording

From the Chicago Reader:

Is it just me, or is the killer new-music group and Chicago-New York presenting force International Contemporary Ensemble responsible for an inordinately large proportion of the exciting new music shows that happen in the city? A few weeks ago I saw violinist David Bowlin give a knockout performance of rarely performed work by Luigi Nono, and I’m super pumped about a program of works by the brilliant Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho happening next month at the MCA.

From the very start one of the key forces behind the organization has been the remarkable flutist Claire Chase, who plays a record release party at the Velvet Lounge tonight.

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You Won’t Find These Poisson Rouge Performers in the 45s Section

From NYTimes.com:

At the early concert, Rachel Grimes, a pianist and composer who writes in a charming if lightweight Impressionistic style, played the 14 vignettes from her recent “Book of Leaves” disc on a split bill with the new-music pianist Sarah Cahill. Ms. Cahill performed selections from “A Sweeter Music,” a series that brings together new works about war and peace and will no doubt become a recording.

The late show was a collaboration between the cellist Matt Haimovitz and the composer Du Yun. They played most of Mr. Haimovitz’s new recording, “Figment,” a challenging collection of harmonically and rhythmically complex works by Elliott Carter, Ana Sokolovic, Luna Pearl Woolf, Steven Stucky, Gilles Tremblay and Ms. Du, linked here by quirky improvisations in which Ms. Du provided electronic sound and spoken texts.

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