Undead Festival Live Review: Cinco DIY-Bring Your Own Mayo

An UNDEAD Improvised Music Review by Monique Avakian

Though I brought homemade chocolate-chip cookies for bait, sadly, I encountered no Zombies. However, there were several Other-Worldly moments that occurred at Brooklyn’s I-Beam on May 5, 2013, including a sighting of Elizabeth Reed making her way around the indeterminate and evolving wreckage near the 7th Street and 4th Avenue crossroads.

During the I-Beam portion of Search & Restore’s annual UNDEAD Festival, audience members were treated to a drum duo on two kits (Vinnie Sperrazza/Jeff Davis Duo); a trio of free-improv (Jesse Stacken Group with Mat Maneri and Devin Gray) and an electronica~trombone improv set with Brian Drye and Jacob Garchik. Big Eyed Rabbit (Max Johnson, bass; Jeff Davis, drums; Ross Martin, guitar) rounded out the evening, but, unfortunately, I had to leave before I got to hear them.

DRUM DUO:
Vinnie Sperrazza and Jeff Davis

These compositions and improvisations were based on the rudiments, and I felt happy when I heard a flam and got that. Not being solid myself with all the rudiments, though, I know missed a lot of conceptual drum~puns; BUT, I had a good time anyway, enjoying two jazz drummers’ takes on the essentials of the extras based on the essentials.

The first tune, “Imaginary Friend,” went by really fast. Strangely, I don’t have any notes on this. Probably because I was too distracted obsessing about Sperrazza’s suped-up, vintage kit — a 1948 black Ludwig (!).

Second up, we had an exploration of Ted Reed’s Syncopation, which was really enjoyable. All drummers know that book because of the dorky cover, which has become a doppelganger for all the cool stuff inside. Sperrazza and Davis made it all the more cool and super intricate, especially at the beginning when the pair started off and maintained a soft volume for a very long time. Later, there was a lot of low-down on the toms spiced with rim clicks and some spontaneous conducting and exclaiming on the part of Sperrazza that led to more joyful joint improv. The whole thing ended with a loud crescendo into a double forte. Ted, I’m sure, would have approved.

Tune #3 began with a lot of cymbal wash and soft toms and fingers brushing against skins. Here, the duo created a very jungle-like, adventurous landscape, conjuring up all sorts of benevolent pacing power animals that lent some heft to the evening. The tune continued to evolve and at one point Davis pushed the butt end of a wooden vibes mallet across his Ride to get a singular soft searing sound; an industrial sound, but mysteriously non-abrasive. This was quite beautiful and enticing—to all spirits, earth-bound as well as transdimensional.

Near the end, this tune took a further ethereal turn when someone’s phone softly made that melodic five figure corporate pattern we all now have annoyingly ingrained in our consciousness. Interestingly, this did not repeat, leading me to think that this must have been a riff offered by the Imaginary Friend Sperrazza encouraged us to wonder about earlier. Then, again, maybe it was Elizabeth Reed calling for Ted. Or, perhaps, it could have been YOU!

In any case, the musicians deftly incorporated this tiny communiqué, ending the piece with a Sperrazza witticism about the day being a DIY Have Your Own Fun kind of thing.

#4 “The Hard One”: This felt like opening a treasure chest of nesting boxes filled with 5s and 10s. Charming and spritely, this exploration expanded my understanding of what might be possible if you trade in unison, if you know what I mean. This piece scaffolded around a structure that felt simultaneously collapsible and expandable with a quick ending. Maybe too quick! Hey, we were enjoying that!

By the time we got to #5, “Heretics on the Theme of Heresy,” we had already learned that we could explore “militarism without the militarism,” so we were ready for this intriguing change-up into a time-based rock feel where the two took turns: one improvising, the other keeping time.

Davis, I noticed, has this sly way of sliding into a ripping fast run, and, in this tune, this really solidified the groove throughout in a very subliminal and pleasing way. You could learn a lot about how to get around the kit from watching this guy, especially when he’s playing soft and fast.

Something really cool happened in the middle of Heretics: somehow, these two managed a complete surfer feel for a minute even though both were playing only snare. Weight, depth, punch, harmony and melody were all evoked clearly, yet, the only sound was snare. Wow! How did they do that!?!

Sperrazza explored a lot of tom work inside of Heretics, moving around the kit deconstructing a bunch of ideas and at moments looking vertically somewhat like Keith Moon without sounding like him at all. And wasn’t Keith Moon into surfer music? Hmmmm…..more DIY magic to ponder, along with Sperrazza inserting a single measure of a swing beat near the end: charming!

TRIO OF FREE IMPROV – Jesse Stacken, Mat Maneri, Devin Gray

This group was the most abstract musically, but conceptually, and with great irony, they began with the most mundane kind of conjure: horns blaring, cars rudely zipping by dangerously close…. It’s the dead of night, and it feels like the end of the world. You realize you’ve been pinned against the cold white tile of the carbon-monoxide filled tunnel buried under the sad and lonely city. And serious choices have got to be made.

Yeah!

Whew!

Eventually, we crossed over into a more pastoral place, with rumbly drums and long bowed single notes from viola. Here, Stacken decided to make full use of the entire piano, moving up and down with really long, loud arpeggiated figures. Then he started pulling these sweet high pings out of the piano strings (literally), choosing next to alternate those with a classical sounding motif played straight up on the keys. At this point, Maneri started tapping the floor and instrument case with his bow while drummer Devin Gray scraped along on something….I think it was metal cookie cooling rack ?!?!?! (He also had a Ride made out of a piece of sheet metal and a hit hat with two mis-matched plates).

Anyway, before long, Maneri’s viola started to bend and Stacken started to pound into repetitive chords forged in sets of four tossed with sporadic rapid runs up and down. Furniture drawers in several adjacent buildings began to open and close in time to all of the sudden slamming sounds. Rugs turned into tigers and lamps flew around the room as various spirits passed through. I felt as if I might dematerialize at any moment!

I didn’t though, just became aware that Maneri was playing duple figures in what seemed like a familiar song turned upside down. Then he and the drummer galloped away, just briefly, before Maneri came back to move into a long drawn out series of single notes, bringing all of that intensity to distill into gentle piano into silence. We all hung there, suspended, for a
long time.

What a fierce experience!

Ooooh!

DUET~QUARTET ELECTRONICA TROMBONE
Brian Drye and Jacob Garchik

Here you had two who became four, with a lot of wires and gizmos and what the heck is going on, I wondered, as it dawned on me that Garchik’s trombone mute was electrified (!) and hooked up to a pedal.

Both trombonists had electric keyboards as well as the acoustic piano to play. Drye had a very simple yet powerful-looking turquoise box, which he arranged carefully on the floor. It soon became clear that this was for looping. Everything was wired into a big black box which at first they couldn’t get working; eventually it was determined that one switch had to be pulled, and we were off like Frankenstein:

Somehow, the duo created unusual loops live in the moment to improvise with. How they managed to make these live transitions so smoothly is unclear and amazing. The ostinatos became very trippy and playful, eventually pulling us into a room full of purring cats on acid, suspended in time like that famous photo of Dali jumping with cats and water. The sound of trombones against all the electronica was warmly intriguing.

At one point, Garchik used the volume switch like a scratch DJ and Drye rigged it so there were several layers of scratching syncopation with the sounds morphing from a tuba timbre to industrial clapslaps to straight up piano.

Then Garchik quoted himself from his new album, The Heavens (!) and Yeats’ little silver fish spoke to me directly, vowing an open musical secret. (*)

The UNDEAD music festival – essential and invigorating.
Catch it next year. I DIY~dare you!

(*) Yeats’ poem, The Song of the Wandering Aengus, I just found out, was originally published in a book entitled: The Wind Among the Reeds. HA!

For further exploration:

http://www.searchandrestore.com/
http://undeadmusic.com/news/
http://ibeambrooklyn.com/calendar/
http://www.vinniesperrazza.org/
http://www.jeffdavisdrums.com/
http://jessestacken.com/
http://devingraymusic.com/
http://musicians.allaboutjazz.com/musician.php?id=9028#.UZGP1I5Rjud (Maneri)
http://jacobgarchik.com/
http://briandrye.com/
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/244302 Yeats poem

Musique Machine Reviews

From Musique Machine:

The Residents – The Ughs
‘The Ughs’ finds The Residents offer up an instrumental album that has a distinctive native American Indian & world music flavour to it, though of course fed through The Residents distinctive, slightly wonky & one- off take on sound making.

Mouthguts – III
The wonderfully named Mothguts are a four piece from New Jersey & Brooklyn who make a face slamming & horn honking mix of proton King Crimson like mettlics, galloping grind-cored & punchy hard core rock, searing jazz attacks & the odd dip into more atmospheric & sleazed jazz/ rock work-outs.

Jute Gyte – Subcon
As much as they may try to distinguish themselves, the obscure Jute Gyte clearly belongs to the recent wave of lo-fi “progressive” noise, a genre that blends various extreme electronic subgenres that perhaps all share a certain spirit.

Theme – Valentine (Lost) Forever
I have this thing against bothering with lousy copies of the original when the original is still alive, kicking and demanding very much to be heard on his/her/its own terms. Case in point: David Tibet and Current 93, who with Nature Unveiled and Dogs Blood Rising gave me creeps and unease of a kind that few others (save maybe his buddy Steve Stapleton) have been able to match.

Various Artists – Brick By Brick
‘Brick By Brick’ is an impressively presented, distinctive looking & sonically quality bound collection of Harsh Noise Wall material. The set offers up seven HNW artists who get a 3inch disc or twenty minutes worthy of space each.

Andreas Brandal – Blunt Force Trauma
‘Blunt Force Trauma’ finds the often noise bound & prolific Andreas Brandal( Flesh coffin, Hour Of The Wolf, Drevne Bolesti) in a slightly less noise & more horror fed harmonic state of sonic mind. Though there’s still a fair share of noise bound elements thrown towards you with-in here too; it just more atmospheric & harmonic bound in it’s intent then much of his work I’ve heard thus far.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Newsbits

Philip Glass in the WNYC studios on December 1...
Image via Wikipedia

Frank Rosaly’s Milkwork is out on Contraphonic.

Flingco Sound has released a free 15 songs compilation of their artists.

Several of Philip Glass‘s discoveries performed recently.

Weasel Walter is interviewed about his recent move to Brooklyn.

Nate Wooley appears at the Douglass Street Music Collective show in Brooklyn at the end of the month.

A new Zu recording is due out on Public Guilt.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

The Necks on Tour in the US

The Necks are conducting a short US tour starting this week:

Saturday January 16th
at Bijou Theatre
Knoxville, TN
http://www.knoxbijou.com

Tuesday January 19th
at The Empty Bottle
Chicago, IL
two shows: 7pm and 10pm
http://www.emptybottle.com

Friday January 22nd
London Ontario Arts Live
http://www.lolafest.com
at Museum London
London, Ontario
http://www.museumlondon.ca
Presented by London Ontario Live Arts (LOLA) and Museum London with Grooves Record Store.

Saturday January 23rd
at The Music Gallery
Toronto, Ontario
http://www.musicgallery.org

Sunday January 24th
Suoni Per Il Popolo et CKUT présentent
at La Sala Rossa
Montreal, Quebec
http://www.casadelpopolo.com/suoniperilpopolo/

Wednesday January 27th
at Issue Project Room
Brooklyn, NY
http://issueprojectroom.org

Thursday January 28th
at Issue Project Room
Brooklyn, NY
http://issueprojectroom.org

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Jazz Listings from the New York Times

From NYTimes.com:

DARCY JAMES ARGUE’S SECRET SOCIETY (Saturday) “Infernal Machines” (New Amsterdam), one of the most celebrated jazz releases of 2009, was the debut of this ultramodern big band, led by Mr. Argue, an indefatigable young composer. Girded with indie-rock textures and a generous sense of drama, it still only captures part of what the group can pull off in performance. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Jazz Gallery, 290 Hudson Street, at Spring Street, South Village , (212) 242-1063, jazzgallery.org; $15; $10 for members. (Chinen)

COMPANY OF HEAVEN JAZZ FESTIVAL (Friday through Sunday) Organized by a booking agency, this event unfurls a succession of worthy artists in brief club sets, beginning with a group led by the trombonist Reut Regev (Friday at 8:30 p.m.) and ending with Ballin’ the Jack, led by the clarinetist Matt Darriau (Sunday at 11 p.m.). In between are more than half a dozen smart bets, including Totem, a group led by the bassist Mario Pavone (Friday at 11); the Thirteenth Assembly, a potent young improvising collective (Saturday at 8:30); and the Michael Musillami Trio + 3, led by Mr. Musillami, a guitarist (Sunday at 8:30 p.m.). Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village , (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; cover, $10 per set, $25 for the night, with a $7 minimum per set. (Chinen)

JON IRABAGON (Saturday and Monday) Mr. Irabagon, an energetic and proficient young alto saxophonist, leads two distinct groups in the coming days, each a reflection of his personality. His quintet — with the trumpeter Brandon Lee, the pianist Adam Birnbaum, the bassist Peter Brendler and the drummer Donald Edwards — plays concise, well-reasoned post-bop, as heard on “The Observer” (Concord), his most recent album. That group appears on Saturday; on Monday Mr. Irabagon, Mr. Brendler and the drummer Kevin Shea make up the Rollins Trio, invoking the precedent of Sonny Rollins and basing a full set’s outcome on the marathon explication of a single tune. Saturday at 10 p.m., Fat Cat, 75 Christopher Street, at Seventh Avenue, West Village, (212) 675-6056, fatcatmusic.org. Monday at 9 p.m., Zebulon, 258 Wythe Avenue, near Metropolitan Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn , (718) 218-6934, zebuloncafeconcert.com; no cover. (Chinen)

INGRID LAUBROCK QUARTET (Wednesday) Ingrid Laubrock, a German-born tenor and soprano saxophonist who is based in Britain, works here with Mary Halvorson, a shrewdly slippery guitarist; John Hébert, a stalwart bassist; and Tom Rainey, a stark, suggestive drummer. At 8:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village , (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; cover, $10, with a $7 minimum. (Chinen)

? TONY MALABY (Monday and Tuesday) Mr. Malaby, a saxophonist of broad imagination and fearless disposition, leads two groups next week, each worthy. On Monday he reunites the band from “Paloma Recio” (New World), one of the better slept-on jazz releases of 2009: the guitarist Ben Monder, the bassist Eivind Opsvik and the drummer Nasheet Waits. On Tuesday he enlists a favorite frontline partner, the trumpeter Ralph Alessi, as well as the bassist Drew Gress and the drummer Billy Drummond. Monday at 8 and 9 p.m., the Local 269, 269 East Houston Street, at Suffolk Street, Lower East Side, (212) 254-5420, rucma.org; $10 per set, or $20 for the night; $7 per set for students, or $15 for the night. Tuesday at 8:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village , (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; cover, $10, with a one-drink minimum. (Chinen)

MOSTLY OTHER PEOPLE DO THE KILLING (Friday) Rampaging through the jazz tradition is the sport of choice for this four-piece free-bop band, led by the bassist Moppa Elliott and featuring the trumpeter Peter Evans, the alto saxophonist Jon Irabagon and the drummer Kevin Shea. “Forty Fort” (Hot Cup), the group’s fourth album, is a characteristic thrill ride, prankish in its affect but gravely serious in its execution. At 9 p.m., Zebulon, 258 Wythe Avenue, near Metropolitan Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn , (718) 218-6934, zebuloncafeconcert.com; no cover. (Chinen)

NYC WINTER JAZZFEST (Friday and Saturday) For New York City jazz fans the Winter Jazzfest has become a perennial postholiday splurge and a righteous kick-start to the new year. Held this year in five separate clubs, all within a tight radius in Greenwich Village, it puts forth a profusion of available talent with an unspoken emphasis on cosmopolitan chic. For highlights, see the feature elsewhere in this section; for a full schedule and ticket information: winterjazzfest.com. Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker Street, near Thompson Street, Greenwich Village ; $25, or $30 for a two-day pass. (Chinen)

CHAD TAYLOR AND CIRCLE DOWN (Thursday) Mr. Taylor, a versatile and texture-aware drummer, functions as the first of equals in this exploratory trio, which also features the lyrical pianist Angelica Sanchez and the responsive bassist Chris Lightcap. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Jazz Gallery, 290 Hudson Street, at Spring Street, South Village , (212) 242-1063, jazzgallery.org; $15, and $10 for members, in the first set; $10, and $5 for members, in the second set. (Chinen)

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Jazz Listings from the New York Times

From NYTimes.com:

THE BAD PLUS (Friday through Sunday) The pianist Ethan Iverson, the bassist Reid Anderson and the drummer David King constitute the Bad Plus, a delivery system for smartly sweeping original songs, as well as wryly affectionate renditions of pop tunes. At 9 and 11 p.m., Village Vanguard, 178 Seventh Avenue South, at 11th Street, West Village , (212) 255-4037, villagevanguard.com; cover, $25, with a $10 minimum.

TIM BERNE AND LOS TOTOPOS (Thursday) Mr. Berne, an alto saxophonist and composer with a taste for coarsely layered frictions, presents a newly minted ensemble with Matt Mitchell on piano and electronics, Oscar Noriega on clarinets and Ches Smith on percussion. The band focuses not only on sharp and convoluted new music by Mr. Berne, but also on some rather obscure material written more than 30 years ago by his former mentor, the saxophonist and composer Julius Hemphill. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Jazz Gallery, 290 Hudson Street, at Spring Street, South Village , (212) 242-1063, jazzgallery.org; cover, $15. (Chinen)

PETER EVANS SEXTET (Monday) Mr. Evans, probably best recognized for his role in the upstart free-bop quartet Mostly Other People Do the Killing, is a trumpeter with an expressive command of timbre and tone. He’s also a bandleader of emerging promise; in this group he corrals the pianist Carlos Homs, the bassist Tom Blancarte, the drummers Kassa Overall and Kevin Shea, and the electronics artist Sam Pluta. An opening set will feature solo saxophone improvisations by Johnny Butler. At 10 p.m., Zebulon, 258 Wythe Avenue, near Metropolitan Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn , (718) 218-6934, zebuloncafeconcert.com; no cover. (Chinen)

GEORGE GARZONE GROUP (Wednesday) Mr. Garzone, a tenor saxophonist with a headlong but intelligent approach to free improvisation, presides over a tribute to the pianist Charlie Banacos, an influential jazz educator who traveled in the same Boston circles as Mr. Garzone (and who died just last month). The ensemble gathered for the task is worthy, with Rachel Z on piano, Peter Slavov on bass and Pete Zimmer on drums. At 8:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village , (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; cover, $10, with a one-drink minimum. (Chinen)

KATT HERNANDEZ AND JOE MORRIS (Thursday) Mr. Morris, a guitarist who applies the clear tone of Jim Hall to darker purposes, has an assertive partner here in Ms. Hernandez, a Philadelphia-based violinist with broad experience in free-improvising and psychedelic-folk circles. At 10 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village , thestonenyc.com; cover, $10. (Chinen)

MAT MANERI QUARTET (Tuesday) Mr. Maneri, a violist with an elastic approach to pulse and pitch, leads a well-suited band with Jacob Sacks on piano, Garth Stevenson on bass and Randy Peterson on drums. At 7 p.m., Barbès, 376 Ninth Street, at Sixth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn , (347) 422-0248, barbesbrooklyn.com; cover, $10. (Chinen)

NICOLE MITCHELL’S TRUTH OR DARE (Saturday) More than a serious and soulful flutist, Ms. Mitchell, from Chicago, organizes her music with a high degree of conceptual savvy. In this group, which probably has nothing to do with Madonna (though you never know), she works alongside the violinist Renée Baker and the drummer Shirazette Tinnin. At 8 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village , thestonenyc.com; cover, $10. (Chinen)

JESSICA PAVONE’S ARMY OF STRANGERS (Tuesday) Ms. Pavone, a violist and violinist with an increasingly prominent profile in avant-garde circles, works here with musicians a good deal more acquainted than her project’s name would suggest: Brandon Seabrook on guitar, Jonti Siman on bass and Harris Eisenstadt on drums. At 8 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village , thestonenyc.com; cover, $10.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Newsbits

Gino Robair
Image via Wikipedia

All About Jazz has a long feature on Vijay Iyer.

Gino Robair blogs about download-only music from the perspective of a fan and a musician.

Paul Sears has posted a few videos of Thee Maximalists.

Brooklyn’s Spike Hill will be the locale of a January 4th show featuring the Landon Knoblock Group and Shot x Shot.

Dublin’s Yard has released a new experimental album for free download.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

A Celebration of the Life of Joe Maneri

From the Boston Microtonal Society:

A Celebration of the Life of Joe Maneri
Irondale Center
February 9, 2010, 8pm

What: A concert to remember and celebrate the life of Joe Maneri
When: Tuesday, February 9, 2010, 8pm
Where: Irondale Center, 85 South Oxford Street, Brooklyn, C train to Lafayette, 1/2/3/4/5/Q/B trains to Atlantic Ave, R/M/N/D/trains to Pacific St
Cost: Suggested donation $10 to be donated to Boston Microtonal Society

Featuring:
Barre Phillips, bass, Jim Black, drums, Tony Malaby, saxophone, Joe Morris, bass, John Medeski, piano Tom Halter, trumpet, Matthew Shipp, piano, Randy Peterson, drums, Ray Anderson, trombone, Craig Taborn, piano, Joe McPhee, saxophone, Joe Karten, trumpet, Matt Moran, vibes, Ed Schuller, bass, Dave Ballou, trumpet, Steve Dalachinsky, poetry, Mike Rivard, electric bass, Liberty Ellman, guitar, Herb Robertson, trumpet, Chris Speed, saxophone, Matt Lavelle, bass clarinet, Pandelis Karayorgis, piano, Noah Kaplan, saxophone, Mat Maneri, viola, and others to be confirmed…..

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Telluric Currents, Series 3 to Take Place at Brooklyn’s I-Beam

Coming to the IBeam:

Continuing the new concert series curated by Brooklyn-based composer/clarinetist Jeremiah Cymerman, the thirdd installment of the Telluric Currents series will take place January 15th & 16th at Brooklyn’s I-Beam.

Celebrating the diversity and creativity of New York’s underground musicians, each night of the series will present different groups of musicians who masterfully blur the lines between composition and improvisation, acoustic and electronic music, subtlety and extremity. The current experimental music scene in New York is as vibrant as ever and the Telluric Currents Concert Series seeks to pay tribute to the richness of the current musical landscape.

Friday, January 15th
8p Chuck Bettis/Dafna Naphtali Duo
Nate Wooley Solo 9p
10p Zach Layton/Ryan Sawyer/Alex Waterman Trio

Saturday January 16th
8p Jeremiah Cymerman Solo
Sara Schoenbeck/Ursel Schlict Duo
10p Brandon Seabrook Solo

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Jazz Listings from the New York Times

From NYTimes.com:

IM BERNE AND LOS TOTOPOS (Wednesday) Mr. Berne, an alto saxophonist and composer with a taste for coarsely layered frictions, presents a newly minted ensemble here, with Matt Mitchell on piano and electronics, Oscar Noriega on clarinets and Ches Smith on percussion. The band focuses not only on sharp and convoluted new music by Mr. Berne, but also on some rather obscure material written more than 30 years ago by his former mentor, the saxophonist and composer Julius Hemphill. At 8 p.m., Barbès, 376 Ninth Street, at Sixth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn , (347) 422-0248, barbesbrooklyn.com; cover, $10. (Chinen)

GERALD CLEAVER (Saturday) Dealing less in rhythm than in pulse, Mr. Cleaver’s drumming perfectly suits the fluid requirements of jazz’s post-everything avant-garde. Here he leads Violet Hour, which features a front line with two tenor saxophonists (Wayne Escoffery and Andrew Bishop) and a smart rhythm section (the pianist Ben Waltzer, the bassist Chris Lightcap). At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village , (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; cover, $10, with a one-drink minimum. (Chinen)

GARAGE À TROIS (Saturday) This ruggedly groove-oriented collective — Skerik on saxophones, Mike Dillon on vibes, Marco Benevento on keyboards and Stanton Moore on drums — rolls through town while touring behind a new album, “Power Patriot,” on the Brooklyn indie label Royal Potato Family. At 9 p.m., Bowery Ballroom, 6 Delancey Street, near the Bowery, Lower East Side , (212) 533-2111, boweryballroom.com; $20. (Chinen)

KONCEPTIONS AT KORZO (Tuesday) In the first set of this weekly series, at 9:30 p.m., the saxophonist John O’Gallagher draws partly from his adventurous new trio release, “Dirty Hands” (Clean Feed). A later set, at 11, will feature a trio led by the hyper-literate guitarist Ben Monder. At Korzo Restaurant, 667 Fifth Avenue, near 20th Street, Park Slope, Brooklyn , (718) 285-9425, korzorestaurant.com; cover, $7. (Chinen)

TONY MALABY QUARTET (Friday and Saturday) Tony Malaby, a tenor saxophonist equally capable of focused tension and wild abandon, enlists experienced partners in this quartet: the trumpeter Ralph Alessi, the bassist Drew Gress and the drummer Billy Drummond. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Jazz Gallery, 290 Hudson Street, at Spring Street, South Village , (212) 242-1063, jazzgallery.org; cover, $15; $10 for members. (Chinen)

POSITIVE CATASTROPHE TRIO (Monday) Positive Catastrophe is a 10-piece band, jointly led by the cornetist Taylor Ho Bynum and the percussionist Abraham Gomez-Delgado, that pursues a blend of Afro-Cuban rhythm and freewheeling improvisation. Here the group is radically pared down to three pieces: the two leaders, along with Reut Regev on trombone. At 7 p.m., Barbès, 376 Ninth Street, at Sixth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn , (347) 422-0248, barbesbrooklyn.com; cover, $10. (Chinen)

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]