Interview with Natasha Barrett 

Source: 5:4.

i’m delighted to present the latest installment in my occasional long-form conversation series The Dialogues. My guest this time is UK-born, Norway-based composer Natasha Barrett, whose music I’ve deeply admired for at least 20 years. Barrett is both a veteran and a pioneer of electronic music, utilising a convoluted mixture of real-world and synthetic sounds to compose highly elaborate, immersive soundworlds. That word “immersive” is no hyperbole: Barrett’s work in ambisonics is at the forefront of creating an all-enclosing listening experience demonstrating intricate control of the 3-dimensional placement of sound. Partly for this reason, Barrett’s work is not often heard in the UK – at least, not often exactly as the composer intends, due to its extensive multi-channel/-speaker demands. The most authentic way to hear her music is therefore to go to Norway and experience it in situ; while the easiest way is via the increasing number of releases devoted to or featuring her work in specially-adapted stereo and binaural versions.

Devin Sarno Interviewed on Mike Watt’s Podcast

Source: The Watt from Pedro Show.

hour one:

john coltrane talks to frank kofsky about practice – november 1966
“darkened valley lullaby” devin sarno

“sound study five” devin & robert sarno
“snow light sleep” sawako
“mobius trip – part III” (live at texas theater) wanz dover
“beautiful dreams” slw & bbjr
“occasional clarity” northern jaw
“real women theme” noisukka
“without teeth you’d be nothing” new woman
“current and former thought” devin sarno

hour two:

“ungodly purple watt” nastassya filippovna
“I be taking samples from your mom” senor salty balls
“the waves” boundless relaxation
“silence broken by laughter” +dog+
“convoy” waldo the dog faced boy

“only peace” nels cline & devin sarno
“aspiration” ben salter
“h.o.c.m.s.” elettrocapra
“V” niagara
“sorrow is nothing but worn-out joy” berke can ozcan
“full dynamics frequency spectrum” devin sarno featuring vincent gallo, joseph hammer, nels cline, bobb bruno & mark wheaton

hour three:

“constant” crib featuring petra haden
“outside at vic’s 2” foam / rawlings / staubitz
“homeland” angela frances wilson & devin sarno

“fly in 5” carla bozulich & devin sarno
“collaboration” elka bong
“buddha’s knee” (elektra sessions + demos) soft white underbelly

Patrick Shiroishi Interview

Source: Art.Laundry.

I dabble with a bunch of instruments, when I was younger I loved getting my hands on and learning different instruments as much as I could. As far as instruments that I’m actually proficient at, I would say piano, guitar, and saxophones. I picked the saxophone in 5th grade when we had school band for no other reason that it looked really cool. Looking at the instrument now, I feel like it is an extension of myself, a way that i can express my emotions when words cannot. It has truly helped me over the years process and explore feelings and I am very grateful for the instrument.

Colin Hinton Interviewed

Source: Jazz Right Now.

I had the opportunity to talk with drummer Colin Hinton over the past six months about his music, training, and perspective as an artist.

Cisco Bradley: You are about to release a collaborative trio record with Rema Hasumi and Shawn Lovato. How did that band come together? What concepts and ideas are you collaborating on?

Colin Hinton: Rema was someone I’d wanted to work with for years but I was always too shy to ask. I’d heard her play at Korzo (I don’t remember whose gig it was) and was totally blown away. I also had her record as a leader, and a few with her as a sideperson. I finally hit her up over the summer and she was down to do a session! I’m still to this day pretty surprised when people seem genuinely interested in playing with me, especially when it’s someone I really admire.

Interview with Hans Joachim Roedelius 

Source: 15 questions.

Hans Joachim Roedelius is one of the artists contributing to ON IN OUT, a 22 track compilation spread out across 4 vinyl LPs or 2 CDs respectively. Compiled by Miho Mepo and released as the debut publication of her new label Advanced Public Listening, the mission statement for the contributions was “no rules, no ego, no pride but pure essence of real music”. Other contributors include Ricardo Villalobos, Julie Marghilano, Move D, Thomas Fehlmann, Daedelus, Atom™, and Matthew Herbert.

Dead Space Chamber Music Interview 

Source: The Sleeping Shaman.

In relation to my recently published review of the dark neo-classical beauty that is The Black Hours, Dead Space Chamber Music’s second album, they contacted me and presented me with the opportunity to throw some probing questions at them, which I was more than happy to do. This brooding record draws from baroque, neofolk, renaissance, medieval, post-rock, avant-garde, and ambient among others, however, it is (after all that) most definitely non-genre specific and this comes from the mouths of the band members.

An Interview With Catherine Sikora

Source: Foxy Digitalis.

There’s this magical moment on Catherine Sikora’s newest album, corners, specifically on the piece “Sometimes, Acceptance is Better Than Love,” where she stops playing for a brief moment and the sound of her saxophone hangs there, resonating in warmth while decaying into nothingness. Those spaces are a trademark of her work and something that keeps drawing me back to her work. It’s in those moments where her ideas quietly explode and become infectious; the space to process and take in her expression becomes a thread that brings the artist and listener into the same zone.

Dead Space Chamber Music Interviewed

Source: The Sleeping Shaman.

In relation to my recently published review of the dark neo-classical beauty that is The Black Hours, Dead Space Chamber Music’s second album, they contacted me and presented me with the opportunity to throw some probing questions at them, which I was more than happy to do. This brooding record draws from baroque, neofolk, renaissance, medieval, post-rock, avant-garde, and ambient among others, however, it is (after all that) most definitely non-genre specific and this comes from the mouths of the band members.