Cryo Chamber Overview Page Published

We have gathered our reviews of albums released on the Cryo Chamber label and re-published them on an overview page. Enjoy.

Cryo Chamber is a label run by Simon Heath, who has been making dark ambient music under the moniker of Atrium Carceri for almost two decades. Born in Sweden and now residing in Oregon, Heath has focused the label on a similar style, with cinematic drones as well as soundtrack-like ambiance and effects. As a consequence, many of the Cryo Chamber releases have science-fiction, urban, or post-apocalyptic themes.

All About Jazz Reviews

Source: All About Jazz.

Multiple Artists
Three Matchless Recordings

Rempis/Parker/Flaten/Cunningham
Stringers & Struts (Aerophonic Records)

Kevin Sun
(Un)seaworthy (Endectomorph Music)

Albert Ayler
Albert Ayler 1965: Spirits Rejoice & Bells Revisited (ezz-thetics)

Agustí Fernández / Liudas Mockūnas
Improdimensions (NoBusiness Records)

Rich Halley
The Shape Of Things (Pine Eagle Records)

Mary Halvorson
Artlessly Falling (Firehouse 12 Records)

Eric Revis
Slipknots Through a Looking Glass (Pyroclastic Records)

Ikue Mori / Satoko Fujii / Natsuki Tamura
Prickly Pear Cactus (Libra Records)

AMN Reviews: Randal Collier-Ford – Advent (2020; Cryo Chamber)

Just when you think that you have a grasp on the expanse of dark ambient music, another artist comes to your attention. Such an artist might not only have a new album out, but also a long discography built up over the years. With 30-plus albums from the last decade, Seattle-based Randal Collier-Ford fits this description.

Advent, nonetheless, goes beyond the standard fare. Not only does it feature the expected ominous drones and waves, but also strings, vocalizations, and clever use of percussion across its three long tracks. The combination of these elements is not only spacious but also post-industrial. Further, there are numerous clear themes that repeat enough to recognizable without becoming tedious.

The strings are textural and the voices chant rather than sing. Indeed, the album is intended to tell a science-fiction story, with echoing mechanical processes hosting weird organic life forms. These sounds get increasingly haunting, as the final track, The Second Wound, includes a plaintive and forbidding piano theme that evolves into martial drumming before fading to silence.