Sun Ra Radio

Source: Sun Ra Radio has debuted with three 3-hour episodes (or one long 9-hour episode) providing an overview of Ra.

Sun Ra Radio is a radio program available to our fans via our website where fans can exclusively hear the music of Sun Ra & his Arkestra.

For the premier edition of Sun Ra radio we give fans an overview of Sun Ra in-studio and in live concert performance. Interviews include Sun Ra narrating his own story plus other artists giving audio accounts of specific subject matter within the program.

Artist interviews include:
​Andrew Cyrille / Charles Gayle / Milford Graves / Sunny Murray / Archie Shepp / Bernard Stollman / Reverend Frank WrighT

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AMN Reviews: Mirio Cosottini – Metodologie dell’improvvisazione musicale [Edizioni ETS: 2017]

Music is a temporal art. It takes place in time and as it does it seems to reveal something essential about time. One way time is revealed to us through music is by way of a spatial metaphor. We perceive a sequence of sounds unfolding in time as moving through an imaginary space. Our hearing music as movement in turn is bound up with our hearing it as changing or staying constant—musical change seems to embody movement, while musical constancy or stasis seems to stand still. In Metodologie dell’improvvisazione musicale, Italian composer, improviser and music theoretician Mirio Cosottini formulates a methodology of improvisation that takes change and constancy as its basic categories.

Cosottini’s methodology casts improvisation in terms of a dialectic of linearity and nonlinearity. These latter two concepts, which trace back to Jonathan Kramer’s book, The Time of Music, provide the foundation not only for Cosottini’s methodology, but for the set of exercises he presents as a means for improvisers to expand their horizons of musical possibility.

Briefly, linearity is the quality of development and change over time; nonlinearity is the quality of invariance over time. Linear music is music that appears to move from one point towards another, in a more-or-less unbroken progression; nonlinear music appears to stay in one place or to reside in discontinuous, autonomous events—to exist outside of or against the inexorable flow of time. The paradigm of linear music is the melody or cyclical chord progression; the paradigm of nonlinear music is the unchanging drone or discrete sound events of a pointillist work. In linear music “before” and “after” are explicitly traced in a succession of sounds; in nonlinear music succession appears to break down entirely into a set of non-contingent moments giving the impression of an eternal “now.” (For those with a taste for metaphysics, the difference between linear and nonlinear can be captured metaphorically by the difference between becoming and being, respectively.)

Cosottini’s appreciation for the potential importance of the nonlinear in music grew out of a personal experience. When asked to compose a contrapuntal exercise over a C major foundation, he wrote a melody based on C melodic minor. After repeated playing, he felt that the dissonance of the minor third within the context of the major modality revealed itself to be of interest as an alternative, if unconventional, way of combining pitches simultaneously rather than an error. Consequently, he began to understand nonlinearity as a way to analyze and organize improvisation.

The exercises, which make up the bulk of the book, are useful not only as ways of getting to know the heft and shape of improvisation’s constituent elements, but as a means of sharpening and directing musical awareness. Some of the exercises address attentiveness and the ability to hear nonlinearity. For example, one listening exercise asks us to hear a set of simultaneously played long tones as a “totality as if it were a sphere.” As the exercise shows, Cosottini presents linearity and nonlinearity are perceptual categories that are applied through judgments that take place within certain contexts; determining whether or not an element is linear or nonlinear may in many cases be the product of a perspective brought to the work. Cosottini describes this perspective in terms of cumulative listening, through which one can discern those pitches, timbres, rhythmic figures, dynamics or other elements that seem detached from the temporal flow of the music

When specifically addressed to active play, the exercises provide practical examples of how to use nonlinearity as a strategy for improvisation. For instance, some of the exercises call for using only five pitches, timbres, sounds or dynamics. Each of these closed sets can serve as the invariant kernel around which an improvisation—its other parameters being allowed to vary—can be built. Paradoxically, the use of relatively small, limited sets of musical material can lend a sense of larger-scale cohesion underlying and tying together individual musical events. When these sets function as constants providing points of reference for development of the improvisation as a whole, the closed set simply becomes an organizing structure for an open performance.

Cosottini’s methodology opens up clear possibilities for leveraging nonlinear forms of organization as alternatives to linear forms of organization. The former are particularly useful for music that eschews tonality; an improvisation based on textural rather than tonal structures, for instance, would offer one such kind of organization. To the extent that it is a purely vertical structure, texture by nature lacks directionality—textural movement doesn’t point toward a goal of resolution as does functional harmonic movement, nor does it imply a kind of musical entailment, as does melodic development. Instead, texture can serve as the basis of an organizational logic embodied in the relative densities, voice combinations and durations of sound complexes or other simultaneous aggregates of musical elements. Organization by textural synchrony, in other words, offers a nonlinear alternative to organization by harmonic or melodic diachrony.

A concern with texture is a concern with architecture in its vertical dimension; it’s a short step from recognizing this to a grasp of the possibilities arising from the use of nonlinear elements as formal substructures upon which to build improvisational superstructures. To take an example from outside the world of improvisation, we can discern in many of Morton Feldman’s compositions a dynamic element which stays at an unchangingly low level. In such cases we could speak of a nonlinear dynamic that serves as a structural anchor, one which remains static while pitches or timbres undergo variations. These changing pitches and timbres would then appear to belong to a linear surface floating over the constant dynamic. Cosottini similarly includes exercises that define musical parameters as constants; it isn’t hard to imagine these constants serving as structural elements on which to build a superstructure of linear events.

In a seeming reversal of meaning, nonlinear elements can serve to define horizontal relationships as well. Some nonlinear strategies—such as the imposition of sudden silences to introduce discontinuity into the flow of an improvisation—could serve as structural boundaries dividing a performance into discrete sections. The pointillism of local discontinuities, by regulating the development of collective sound densities, would then foster organization at the textural level. Recurring yet invariant tones or timbres, such as are suggested in some of Cosottini’s exercises could, when played during structurally separate passages, set up cross-sectional relationships through thematic coherence. An improvisation made up of autonomous events not explicitly related to what precedes or succeeds them—the kind of piece Cosottini refers to as “without memory [senza memoria]”—would nevertheless cohere through a unity of repetition and recollection. This would seem to present the paradox of having locally nonlinear elements work together to create a global sense of linearity, or continuity, but it is through such paradoxes that the musical dialectic of linearity and nonlinearity works in practice.

http://www.edizioniets.com

Daniel Barbiero

All About Jazz Reviews

Source: All About Jazz.

Jon Hassell
Listening To Pictures (Pentimento Volume one) (Ndeya)

Michael Moss’s Accidental Orchestra
Helix (Fourth Stream Records)

Espen Eriksen Trio With Andy Sheppard
Perfectly Unhappy (Rune Grammofon)

Silvan Schmid Quintet
At Gamut (Hatology)

Henry Kaiser – Ed Pettersen
We Call All Times Soon (Split Rock)

SUSS
Ghost Box (Self Produced)

Samo Salamon
Traveling Moving Breathing (Clean Feed Records)

Barre Phillips / Motoharu Yoshizawa
Oh My, Those Boys! (NoBusiness Records)

This Week in New York

Source: I CARE IF YOU LISTEN.

FACE THE MUSIC AND LUNA COMPOSITION LAB
Face the Music performs the world premieres of new works by teen composers selected to participate in the second year of Luna Composition Lab, a new program for young women composers noted in The New Yorker, The New York Times, WQXR, HuffPost and MusicalAmerica. The program also includes works by established composers.
Monday, June 4 at 7:00 PM
Tickets $10
Roulette, 509 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, NY

GLASS FARM ENSEMBLE
In the last program of the season the Glass Farm Ensemble performs Klaus Huber’s Schattenblätter (Shadow leaves), Rico Gubler’s Trio IR, Denis Schuler’s 1444, Salvatore Sciarrino’s Sonatina for violin and piano, and Alban Berg’s Adagio.
Monday, June 4 at 7:30 PM
Tickets $20
Symphony Space, Leonard Nimoy Thalia, 2537 Broadway, New York, NY

SPEKTRAL QUARTET | POP-UP CONCERT
Spektral Quartet makes their Miller debut with a program of works composed in the last decade, including a quartet written for them by George Lewis.
Tuesday, June 5 at 6:00 PM
Free
Miller Theatre, 2960 Broadway, New York, NY

GEMMA PEACOCKE: ERASURE
Erasure explores the marginalized experiences of women through a new program of solo and chamber works. Composed by Gemma Peacocke, directed by Benita de Wit, and featuring string quartet Schiele, saxophonist Shelley Washington and a unique ensemble of performers, gender and identity themes are reflected and refracted across different instruments in a performance that blends live music and electronics, and shimmers with the potential of a new and uncharted cultural landscape.
Wednesday, June 6 at 8:00 PM
Tickets $20
Roulette, 509 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, NY

JAKOB ULLMANN’S MÜNTZERS STERN, PERFORMED BY DAFNE VICENTE-SANDOVAL
Dafne Vicente-Sandoval performs the New York premiere of Müntzers stern by Jakob Ullmann, a 2015 piece for solo bassoon and pre-recorded voice written specifically for her. The title refers to Thomas Müntzer (1489-1525), a German Reformation theologian known for his his open defiance of late-feudal authority, and is based on one of his hymns and the medieval German text of his Von dem getychten glawben der Christenheyt (On the Imaginary Belief of Christendom).
Thursday, June 7 at 8:00 PM
Tickets $20, $15 members
San Damiano Mission, 85 North 15th Street, Brooklyn, NY

COMPCORD PRESENTS PAYTON MACDONALD – MARIMBA
Composers Concordance presents composer-percussionist Payton MacDonald in a program combining marimba virtuosity with a myriad of improvisational elements. MacDonald’s own compositions, as well as new music by Gene Pritsker, Dan Cooper, Mark Kostabi, Peter Jarvis, and Carlos José Castro Mora, will be featured. Opening the concert will be a performance of electronic compositions by Jean Burden, Kirk Clarke, and Cristhopper J. Armenta, students from Pritsker’s ‘Making Music With Technology’ class at 92Y.
Friday, June 8 at 7:00 PM
Tickets $10
Kostabi World Uptown, 357 East 62nd Street, New York, NY

FESTIVAL OPENING NIGHT— THERE’S NO HOLDING BACH | CHELSEA MUSIC FESTIVAL
The 2018 Chelsea Music Festival’s Opening Night launches nine days of celebration around the 333rd birthday of J.S. Bach and his influence on generations of musicians, composers, thinkers, worshippers, artists & listeners. Alongside Bach‘s 5th Brandenburg Concerto, the program features reflections and arrangements on Bach by Sofia Gubaidulina and Max Reger, as well as original works by 2018 Composer-in-Residence Aaron Jay Kernis. Save 10% on the price of tickets with the discount code CMFICIYL.
Friday, June 8 at 7:30 PM
Tickets $83
St. Paul’s Church, 315 West 22nd Street, New York, NY

HETEROTOPIA PRESENTS: INFINITE JEST
Heterotopia, in its premiere performance, explores collective improvisation in juxtaposition with written compositions for acoustic instruments and live electronics. The program seeks to embody David Foster Wallace’s magnum opus Infinite Jest, a work that confronts our addictions to the artificial life and our obsessive need to be distracted from reality.
Friday, June 8 at 8:00 PM
Tickets $10
Scholes Street Studio, 375 Lorimer Street, Brooklyn, NY

LIVE 45 CONCERT: L45-011
The fourth season of Live 45 concludes on June 9 with two world premieres. Aidan Cook, an artist and community organizer based in Boulder, Colorado, will be presenting Coternum Kaledia for viola and cello with the application of a computer. The second premiere will be by Michael J. Vince.
Saturday, June 9 at 8:30 PM
Tickets $15, $10 students/seniors
Spectrum, 70 Flushing Avenue, Garage A, Brooklyn, NY

TEN YEARS TOGETHER: NEW AMSTERDAM RECORDS & LE POISSON ROUGE TURN 10
New Amsterdam Records and (le) Poisson Rouge were both born in 2008 with the mission of promoting the New Music community. Since inception, the organizations have partnered regularly to present boundary-breaking artists, collaborations, and music. As such, they will celebrate their 10th anniversaries together through a series of adventurous, high-quality programming for which both organizations are known, featuring artists and friends in the New Amsterdam Records community. This concert features Roomful of Teeth and Arooj Aftab.
Sunday, June 10 at 2:30 PM
Tickets $20-$30
Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker Street, New York, NY

LPR X: OLIVIA CHANEY “SHELTER” ALBUM RELEASE (NONESUCH RECORDS)
Sunday, June 10 at 6:00 PM
Tickets $20-$25
Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker Street, New York, NY

SHAWN LAWSON AND THE PROGRESSION ENSEMBLE
Video artist Shawn Lawson will live-code real time computer graphics with live music by The Progression Ensemble. The concert will include the world premiere of David Rothenberg’s And One Day We’ll Know Why Whales Sing for Accordion, Cello, Guitar and pre-recorded whale, and Gene Pritsker’s Traffic Signal II for accordion and cello, together with new works by Christopher Cook, Eric Despard, Michael Dilthey, Gene Pritsker, and Bjorn Bolstad Skjelbred, and a new arrangement of Dan Cooper’s Lullaby.
Sunday, June 10 at 8:15 PM
Tickets $8
ShapeShifter Lab, 18 Whitwell Place, Brooklyn, NY

LPR X: ACME PERFORMS THE MUSIC OF JÓHANN JÓHANNSSON
Johann JohannssonLong DescriptionJohann Johannsson
Sunday, June 10 at 9:30 PM
Tickets $25
Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker Street, New York, NY

Downtown Music Gallery Newsletter

Source: Downtown Music Gallery.

Six from Clean Feed: Marty Ehrlich/John Hebert/Nasheet Waits! Sean Conly/Michael Attias/Satoshi Takeishi! Angles 3: Martin Kuchen/Ingebrigt Haker Flaten/Kjell Nordeson! Chris Pitsiokos Unit! Honest John Ab Baars! Bill Frisell & Chantal Acda! Pharoah Sanders 1968! Joelle Leandre & Elisabeth Harnik! Angelika Niescier/Chris Tordini/Tyshawn Sorey!

Dave Gisler Trio! Three from Kristo Rodzevski with Mary Halvorson & Tomas Fujiwara! Big Blood & Chuck Bettis! Six Duck Baker Restocks! Plus Historic Discs from Bo Hansson! Nikki Sudden! Nurse with Wound! John Fahey DVD! Derek Bailey & Evan Parker LP! Serge Gainsbourg and Much More..!

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DMG 28th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION (Part 1)

This Monday, June 4th at 8pm:
KALABALIK featuring RAOUL BJORKENHEIM, ANDERS NILSSON & GERALD CLEAVER!
At The New School, 55 West 13th St (upstairs from The Stone) – just east of 6th Ave
on the fifth floor in the Jazz Performance Space
Admission: Donation – whatever you can afford

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Upcoming Sets at Downtown Music Gallery – FREE, every Sunday at 6pm

THE DMG 28TH ANNIVERSARY SERIES OF SONIC CELEBRATIONS Continue with:

This Sunday, June 3rd:
6pm: DAVID AARON / ROB RITCHIE / DAVE GOULD –
Soprano Sax / Electric Guitar / Drums
7pm: SAM NEWSOME – Solo Soprano Sax

This Monday, June 4th: DMG 28th Anniversary Celebration! At The New School:
8pm: KALABALIK: RAOUL BJORKENHEIM / ANDERS NILSSON / GERALD CLEAVER!

Sunday, June 10th:
6pm: CARLO COSTA / CHRISTIAN MEAAS SVEDSEN / SAM KULIK – Percussion / Bass / Trombone
7pm: JONATHAN MORITZ / SEAN ALI / CARLO COSTA – Sax / Bass/ Drums

Rare, Monday June 11th:
6:30 – CARTOON JUSTICE With G. CALVIN WESTON/MIKA PONTECORVO/KERSTI ABRAMS/ADRIANE PONTECORVO/MARK PINO/ELIJAH PONTECORVO – Drums/Guitar/Alto Sax/Cello/El. Bass/Waterphone

Sunday, June 17th:
6pm: PRACTITIONER: BEN GOLDBERG and MICHAEL COLEMAN – CD Release Set
7pm: NICOLA HAIN / BRIGGAN KRAUSS – Electric Guitar & Alto Sax
8pm: KAWAGUCHI KENYA and NICOLAS LETMAN-BURTINOVIC! – Shakuhachi & Acoustic Bass

Tuesday, June 19th: Bruce’s Birthday Bash!
Dance party Here at DMG with Snacks and Spirits!
Check out some Funky DJ Music by MC Bruce Lee

Sunday, June 24th:
6pm: TODD CAPP’S MYSTERY TRAIN: KURT RALSKE / EMILIE LESBROS /
AUSTIN COVELL / ANDREW HAAS / TODD CAPP
7pm: DCNN: DANIEL CARTER NEWS NETWORK: ELI WALLACE /
BEN COHEN / DANIEL CARTER / DAN KURFIRST

Art Ensemble of Chicago at Primavera Sound Festival in Barcelona Reviewed

Source: LondonJazz.

Art Ensemble of Chicago, performing a crafted one hour set, took an unexpected standing ovation from a festival crowd in the thousand-seater indoor auditorium housed in the Museu de les Ciències Naturals de Barcelona, the “Museu Blau”.

The Art Ensemble is one of the most distinctive collectives in free jazz, which is a music often mistaken for chaos, but Anarquía is closer. Anarchy is not chaos. Free jazz is not chaos. The Art Ensemble is not free jazz. The Art Ensemble is anarchy. Anarchy is decentralisation, and this has been a defining feature of the group since its inception.