AMN Reviews: The Thing – Again (2018; Trost Records)

Scandinavian free-jazz outfit The Thing is back with Again, released earlier this month. Consisting of Mats Gustafsson (sax), Ingebrigt Haker Flaten (bass), and Paul Nilssen-Love (drums), this trio plows through nearly 40 minutes of improv across three tracks.

Unlike some recordings of this ilk, The Thing offers a dense, active approach with all three members fully participating throughout the vast majority of the album. Particularly appealing is how they each seem to be playing independently from one another and yet their combined efforts still form a cohesive whole. Thus, Haker Flaten and Nilssen-Love take on lead roles despite most of the soloing ostensibly coming from Gustafsson.

The album opens with the 21-minute Sur Face, most of which is a Gustafsson showcase, featuring some of his more restrained playing juxtaposed with more aggressive lines from the rhythm section. After inclusion of a short solo from Haker Flaten, Gustafsson and Nilssen-Love join back for a downtempo and introspective interlude, which finishes as a drum solo. With 8 minutes left, the group comes back together, this time with Gustafsson playing in his more familiar and harsher outside style.

Decision in Paradise, an old Frank Lowe piece that was not particularly avant-garde, follows. The Thing stretches it out a bit, slowly ramping it up with chaos and unusual textures. Gustafsson overdubs on soprano and tenor.

Vicky Di rounds out the album with a solid slab of adrenaline highlighted by a monstrous distorted bass solo from Haker Flaten. Perhaps ironically, Haker Flaten and Nilssen-Love otherwise play in a more focused and complementary manner than they do on the other tracks. Over this, Gustafsson wails in a late Coltrane fashion.

The Thing is quintessential free jazz – this is the group that you would recommend to someone who is first exploring the genre as well as more experienced listeners. Another stellar release from this threesome.

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Anthony Braxton at Cafe Oto Reviewed

Source: thebluemoment.com.

By Anthony Braxton’s standards, his ZIM Music septet is a relatively modest affair. But the hour and a quarter of unbroken music they produced during the second of their three nights at Cafe Oto this week proved to be astonishingly rich and complex in its range of gesture and effect.

The musicians — Taylor Ho Bynum (cornet, flugelhorn and trombone), Jacqueline Kerrod and Miriam Overlach (concert harps), Jean Cook (violin), Adam Matlock (accordion, recorders and voice) and Dan Peck (tuba) — responded with great enthusiasm and devotion to Braxton’s scores and to his methods of internal organisation. He supplied most of the visual cues — holding up fingers, making a diamond shape with both hands, giving nods — but sometimes letting others take over, notably Barnum but also Matlock, who seemed at one stage to be supplying pre-arranged prompts to one of the harpists.

Vital Weekly Reviews 1134

Source: Vital Weekly.

SONOLOGYST – SILENCERS (CD by Cold Spring Records) *
MAYUKO HINO – LUNISOLAR (CD by Cold Spring Records) *
NOVI_SAD – INTERNATIONAL INTERNAL CATASTROPHES (CD, private) *
FABIO ORSI/ALESSANDRA GUTTAGLIERE – GIARDINO FORICO; NUMBER 1: NAPLES (CD, book by Silentes) *
JEPH JERMAN – IMBRACTION (CD by Unfathomless) *
DIRK SERRIES – EPITAPH (2CD by Consouling Sounds) *
DIRK SERRIES & COLIN WEBSTER – GARGOYLES (CD by Raw Tonk Records) *
JACQUES DEMIERRE – ABECEDAIRE/ABC BOOK (book and CD by Lenka Lente) *
DEMIERRE-DÖRNER-KOCHER – CONE OF CONFUSION (CD by Bruit) *
GURA – CALIGURA (LP by Silken Tofu/CD by Consouling Sounds) *
JASON VAN GULICK – CONCRETE (LP by Silken Tofu/CD by Consouling Sounds) *
PLURALS – TRI TONE (LP by Silken Tofu)
NILS ROSTAD – USES INSTRUMENTS BECAUSE HE LIKES THE SOUNDS (LP by Tallerk Plater)
TWENTYTWENTYONE/DIISSC ORCHESTRA (split LP by MIC Lithuania)
PAVILION/PAVILJONAS (CD compilation by MIC Lithuania)
KATJA INSTITUTE – TIME AGE (3CDR, private) *
KALLABRIS – KETTENWINDEL BINGO (CDR by Klappstuhl Records) *
LANDSCAPE: ISLANDS (compilation cassette by Aural Detritus)
LÄRMSCHUTZ – DIVINE DESCENT (cassette, private)
SPARKLE IN GREY – THE BONES OF QUIETNESS (cassette, private)

Avant Scena Reviews

Source: Avant Scena.

Alexander von Schlippenbach – Globe Unity Orchestra – “Globe Unity – 50 Years” (Intakt, 2018)

Rodrigo Amado / Joe McPhee / Kent Kessler / Chris Corsano – “A History of Nothing” (trost records, 2018)

Marty Ehrlich | John Hebert | Nasheet Waits – “Trio Exaltation” (Clean Feed, 2018)

Der lange Schatten – “Concurrences” (Trouble In The East, 2018)

THE THING – “Again” (trost records, 2018)

Sean Conly | Michaël Attias | Satoshi Takeishi – “Hard Knocks” (Clean Feed, 2018)

Angelika Niescier | Christopher Tordini | Tyshawn Sorey – “The Berlyn Concert (Live)” (Intakt, 2018)

Nils Frykdahl Interview

Source: Colorado Springs Independent.

Free Salamander Exhibit consists of Frykdahl and Rathbun along with Sleepytime multi-instrumentalist Michael Mellender, former Sleepytime drummer David Shamrock, and multi-instrumentalist Drew Wheeler. Their music is complicated and angular, paying homage to the Rock in Opposition movement, a collective of experimental 1970s bands like Henry Cow and Univers Zero. To that end, they often use homemade instruments, perhaps most prominently Rathbun’s massive sledgehammer dulcimer — picture something like a lap-steel guitar, but 7 feet long, made with piano strings and played with a hammer. Frykdahl’s vocal lines fluctuate from death metal snarling to a resonant baritone to falsetto, all richly expressive. Further, they’re big fans of confusion, especially rhythmic confusion in their music.

Photos to Honor the 25th Anniversary of Sun Ra’s Death

Source: Magnum Photos.

Guy Le Querrec’s photographic career has been intertwined with jazz music from the outset, with his earliest work being made in London in the late 1950s, where he became immersed in the city’s jazz scene. Throughout his career the genre has been a constant, with iconic portraits of jazz greats, from Miles Davis, to Charles Mingus, Wynton Marsalis, Archie Shepp, and Nina Simone studding his longterm projects. His photographs of Sun Ra and his band, most commonly known as the Arkestra, capture the group’s intimacy just as much as the leader’s otherness.