Heterodyne in Baltimore, April 6

On Friday, April 6Heterodyne appears at Baltimore’s The Holy Underground, which is located at 2021 Maryland Ave.  The performance begins at 8.

Heterodyne is an improvisational project; its co-founders and core performers are Maria Shesiuk (Moog and processed vocalizations) and T. A. Zook (NS Design Omni Bass, strung as a basscello). Although it is essentially a duo, when complex schedules permit, it performs with Patrick Whitehead on quarter-tone flügelhorn and trumpet; Bob Boilen on ARP synthesizer; Doug Kallmeyer on bass and synthesizer; Jerry Busher on drums; Sarah Hughes on sax; Leah Gage on drums; Sam Lohman on drums; Amanda Huron on drums; and Dan Gutstein, spoken word.

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A Closer Listen Reviews

Source: A Closer Listen.

Various Artists ~ Each Morning of the World

Echo Collective ~ Echo Collective Plays Amnesiac

Clarice Jensen ~ For this from that will be filled

Zinovia Arvanitidi ~ Ivory

Gianluca Favaron ~ Variations (Fragments of Evanescent Memories)

Jóhann Jóhannsson ~ Englabörn & Variations

Gary Peters Interview

Source: Perfect Sound Forever.

Taking a philosophical view of improvisation is something Gary Peters has been doing at least since his writing of the book The Philosophy of Improvisation, published in 2009. More recently, he’s published Improvising Improvisation, a consideration of improvisation from within the tradition of Continental philosophy, beginning with Kant and Hegel and informed more recently by the work of Derrida, Deleuze and Badiou. This latest book isn’t only about improvisation; it was itself improvised—”written each and every day from scratch,” as he described it. It may be an unusual way to write a book of philosophy issued by an academic publisher, but improvisation is something Peters is well-acquainted with: in addition to being chair of philosophy and performance at York St. John University in York, England, he is himself an improvising musician, an accomplished multi-instrumentalist who has been active in genres as different as avant-garde jazz and Country & Western.

Matthew Shipp Interview

avant-garde pianist Matthew Shipp

Source: Downbeat.

Pianist Matthew Shipp has opened 2018 with a pair of new albums that mark his debut as a leader on the historic ESP-Disk, where he joins the likes of Albert Ayler, Don Cherry, Lowell Davidson and Ran Blake in the imprint’s longstanding efforts to champion creative music.

The first title, Zero, is the musical extension of a scientific dissertation he gave at The Stone last year, exploring the number and its varying degrees of meaning across 11 compositions for solo piano. The other LP, Sonic Fiction, is a free-flowing quartet recording that reunites Shipp with longtime drummer Whit Dickey, bassist Michael Bisio and Mat Walerian, a fiery young saxophonist from Poland who once took lessons from the bandleader.

The politically active icon of New York’s underground jazz scene took some time to discuss those aforementioned albums, as well as Oneness, a new three-disc collection with Ivo Perelman, and Seraphic Light: Live At Tufts University, that finds him in collaboration with saxophonist Daniel Carter and the incomparable bassist William Parker.