Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music 

Lou Reed. Schinitzer Concert Hall Portland, OR

Source: Pitchfork, yet another discussion of this iconic album and its mysterious origin.

It’s all there in the first minute: there’s a low-mid whoosh that’s clearly guitar feedback, like a Jimi Hendrix power chord trailing off; there’s a bit of an electric rattle, perhaps a fluttering speaker cone gasping for air; then come the high-pitched screeches, perhaps bringing to mind a grainy video image of seagulls circling over an open sea filled with radioactive garbage. From there, a ringing squall is folded in, an unstable mess of harmonics that shudders and quakes like nerve impulses curling down a human spine. And with that, we’re deep into Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music.

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All About Jazz Reviews

English: Elliott Sharp live at Saalfelden 2009...

Source: All About Jazz.

Elliott Sharp
Err Guitar (Intakt Records)

Nik Turner
Life In Space (Purple Pyramid)

Heath Watts
Bright Yellow with Bass (Leo Records)

Alexander Hawkins / Elaine Mitchener Quartet
UpRoot (Intakt Records)

Satoko Fujii Orchestra New York
Fukushima (Libra Records)

Yedo Gibson / Hernani Faustino / Vasco Trilla
Chain (NoBusiness Records)

Magnus Granberg
Nattens Skogar – version for four players (INSUB)

Wadada Leo Smith
Solo: Reflections and Meditations on Monk (TUM Records)

Wadada Leo Smith
Najwa (TUM Records)

Gard Nilssen
Live In Europe (Clean Feed Records)

This Week in New York

Philip Glass in the WNYC studios on December 1...

Source: I CARE IF YOU LISTEN.

PRISMA INTERIUS: III
Catherine Lamb will perform Prisma Interius: III, the most recent development in a series of pieces constructed around the Secondary Rainbow Synthesizer, an instrument created with composer Bryan Eubanks that spectrally filters a live sound input of the outer atmosphere into the concert space.
Tuesday, December 5 at 8:00 PM
Tickets $20, $15 members
The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, New York, NY

CAGE, KOTIK, AND EASTMAN: 1972 / 2017
In a tradition which began in 1984, the S.E.M. Ensemble (SEM) led by artistic director Petr Kotik returns to Paula Cooper Gallery for its annual holiday concert on Thursday, December 7, at 8 p.m. The evening will repeat the program conceived by SEM for its first European tour in 1972. The pieces to be performed will be Song Books I, II, There is Singularly Nothing, and Macle.
Thursday, December 7 at 8:00 PM
Tickets $15, $10 students/seniors
Paula Cooper Gallery, 534 West 21st Street, New York, NY

SONG INSTALLATION (MECHANICAL INSTRUMENTS BY NICK YULMAN) | UNCAGED TOY PIANO FESTIVAL
Nick Yulman will fill the DiMenna Center’s Benzaquen Hall with Song Installation, an array of digitally controlled mechanical instruments, creating an immersive listening environment for listeners to explore. These musical automata will accompany disembodied voices emanating from radios, and perform a musical program that ranges from tightly choreographed pop songs to textural soundscapes that move around the room like shifting weather patterns.
Friday, December 8 at 4:00 PM
The DiMenna Center for Classical Music, Benzaquen Hall, 450 West 37th Street, New York, NY

ORCHESTRA UNDERGROUND: REFLECTED IN GLASS—PHILIP GLASS AND THE NEXT GENERATION
American Composers Orchestra, under the baton of Music Director George Manahan, performs Violin Concerto No. 2, “The American Four Seasons” by Philip Glass, featuring violinist Timothy Fain. This piece is paired with premieres by composers who have worked closely with Glass, including the world premiere of Pauchi Sasaki’s GAMA XVI for Orchestra and Electronics, featuring the composer on electronics, and the New York premiere of Bryce Dessner’s Réponse Lutosławski.
Friday, December 8 at 7:30 PM
Tickets $41-$51
Carnegie Hall, Zankel Hall, 881 7th Avenue, New York, NY

ALL TOY IN C | UNCAGED TOY PIANO FESTIVAL
For a typical uncagean twist, In C will be performed entirely on toy instruments! In C is a minimalist masterpiece composed by Riley in 1964 for an indefinite number of performers which uses a mosaic of short melodic fragments. Do you have a toy instrument you plan to bring and play? Please do! Do you want to come and have an interesting toy instrument handed to you to play? That also works!
Friday, December 8 at 8:00 PM
The DiMenna Center for Classical Music, Cary Hall, 450 West 37th Street, New York, NY

KETTLE CORN NEW MUSIC
Kettle Corn New Music presents the Argus Quartet with special guest Lucy Fitz Gibbon in a program of Kaija Saariaho’s Cloud Trio, the New York premiere of Loren Loiacono’s Waxing Cerulean, and the world premiere of Jordan Nelson’s Tender Buttons, a new work for string quartet and soprano based on text by Gertrude Stein
Saturday, December 9 at 7:00 PM
Free
New York Public Library at 53rd Street,18 West 53rd Street, New York, NY

CELEBRATING PHILIP GLASS | DENNIS RUSSELL DAVIES AND MAKI NAMEKAWA
Dennis Russell Davies and Maki Namekawa perform an all-Philip Glass recital of music for two pianos and piano four-hands. The program includes the two-piano suite from Glass’s opera Les Enfants Terribles, a selection of music for piano-four hands including “The Chase” from Orphée, the New York premiere of the musical interlude from The Voyage, and Stokes, as well as Glass’s Four Movements for Two Pianos.
Saturday, December 9 at 8:00 PM
Tickets $15-$20
Roulette, 509 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, NY

ALL ABOUT INDIA
All About India features performances by CompCord Ensemble, Neela Vaswani, and Raga Massive Duo, among others. Compositions by Lukas Ligeti, Milica Paranosic, Dan Cooper, Gene Pritsker, Payton MacDonald, Edmundo Ramirez, and Daniel Schnyder will be premiered. Traditional Indian instruments such as tablas, sitar, and santoor (hammered dulcimer) will be heard alongside classical winds and strings, as well as electric guitar, bass, electronics, and hybrid instruments designed by Ken Butler.
Sunday, December 10 at 6:00 PM
Tickets $15, $12 students/seniors
Goddard Riverside, Bernie Wohl Center, 647 Columbus Avenue, New York, NY

Walter Prati’s Book on Improvisation Reviewed

Source: Perfect Sound Forever.

As Milanese cellist, electronics artist and composer Walter Prati points out early on in his brief but insightful book, improvisation is an essential–indeed, an ineliminable–element in virtually every kind of music. He notes that virtually all types of music contain at least some element of improvisation, whether in the form of jazz’s melodies extemporized over chord changes, folk’s invention of structures within an oral tradition, or classical music’s allowance of a degree of interpretive freedom to the performer of a written score. One might even go so far as to say that music originates in improvisation: even a fully scored work has to start somewhere, and that somewhere may as often as not be an improvised melody or harmonic sequence.