Lampo Fall 2016 Schedule

Source: Chicago’s Lampo.

MSHR SEP 24

Art duo MSHR premieres Macro Synthetic Helio Resistor—a quadraphonic performance involving their new Boolean logic chip-based analog modular synthesizers in a feedback system with lasers, strobes and incandescent lights.

YOSHI WADA & TASHI WADA OCT 22

Composer, instrument builder and Fluxus artist Yoshi Wada and composer Tashi Wada make a rare Chicago appearance—Yoshi’s first since ’93 and Tashi’s local debut. The father-son duo presents an evening-length performance for Lampo based on a loose, ever-shifting structure with a newly modified setup of sirens, alarm bells, audio generators, bagpipes and organ.

SARA LUDY NOV 5

Sara Ludy premieres a new live audiovisual performance that arranges found imagery and field recordings into a rhythmic composition of otherworldly forms.

SARAH DAVACHI NOV 19

In her Chicago debut, composer Sarah Davachi premieres new work for Lampo—a composition for vintage synthesizers, harmonium and two cellos that explores the acoustics of the Stony Island Arts Bank, while creating a lush, immersive environment to take listeners inward.

CHARLES CURTIS DEC 9

Solo concert by the great Charles Curtis, who will perform works by Alvin Lucier, Tashi Wada and Alison Knowles.

Vital Weekly Reviews 1047

logoSource: Vital Weekly.

WRANGLER — WHITE GLUE (CD by MemeTune Recordings) *
LEGIAC — THE VOYNICH MANUSCRIPT (CD by Dronarivm) *
JASON SHARP — A BOAT UPON ITS BLOOD (CD by Constellation Records) *
OFF WORLD — 1 (CD by Constellation Records) *
AUTOMATISME — MOMENTFORM ACCUMULATIONS (CD by Constellation Records) *
STAR TURBINE — NOTHING SHOULD MOVE UNLESS YOU WANT IT TO (CD by Frozen Light) *
GINTAS K — DIMENSIONS (CD by Frozen Light) *
IOS & SOPHUS — LOVE OF ONE (CD by Frozen Light) *
EE ES EM — BYLONEBYLIRYBANARUBY (CD by Napalmed) *
RLW & PAAK — ZUR ARBEIT 1 (LP by Attenuation Circuit)
THE UNMEDIATED MEDIATION (LP by Onomatopee)
GREAT WAITRESS — HUE (LP by Another Dark Age)
JONAS OLESEN — OBJEKT #3 (vinyl object by Bin)
NIKLAS ADAM — A3&B (12″” by Bin)
DUKE ST WORKSHOP — SCURO ESTIVO (7″ by Static Caravan) *
ALESSANDRO SERAVALLE — MORFOCREAZONI I-V (CDR by Setola Di Maiale) *
ATARAXIC ATAXIA — SHADOW SEA (CDR by No Part Of It) *
BLOOD RHYTHMS — SKIN FLINT (CDR by No Part Of It/Ka Rey Eye Tapes) *
MEINEIN/N(48) (split CDR by Attenuation Circuit) *
KONKETE ANTI-WULST — DIE GESPENSTISCHE MISTHAUFEN-KONSERVE (CDR by Attenuation Circuit) *
SKREI — CÖRENGRÄTÖ (CDR by Attenuation Circuit) *
ALTESA — SENSAZIONI (CDR by Attenuation Circuit) *
BELLEROPHONE — STRAW DOG (CDR by Attenuation Circuit) *
LE SCRAMBLED DEBUTANTE – SAPPHIRE IN THE PANCREAS (CDR by Attenuation Circuit) *
MODELBAU — LIFEBOAT (cassette by No Rent Records) *
DRUUNA JAGUAR & PHANTASM NOCTURNES — SPECULATIVE REALISM (cassette by Cruel Nature Records)
DRUUNA JAGUAR / HEIDYYOUKO — SPLIT (cassette, no label)

Igloo Magazine Reviews

Source: Igloo Magazine.

Robert Logan :: Flesh Decomposed (Slowfoot)
Kronodigger :: ENC015 EP (Encrypted Audio)
Haunted Me :: The Pale Ones (Self-Released)
V/A :: Dogma (Analogic Density)
Gareth Davis :: Filament (Slaapwel)
Porya Hatami :: Phone To Logos (Audiobulb)
Mammal Hands :: Floa (Gondwana)
Sarathy Korwar :: Day To Day (Ninja Tune / The Steve Reid Foundation)
Nomade Orquestra :: Nomade Orquestra (Far Out)
BadBadNotGood :: IV (Innovative Leisure)

10 Things to Consider When You’re Submitting an Album for Review

From the department of I Could Have Written This Myself, good advice from I CARE IF YOU LISTEN. Please consider applying these ideas to AMN review submissions. Also, if we don’t pick your music for review, it really doesn’t say anything bad about your music. It says nothing at all. We review less than 3% of all submissions, mainly because we don’t have time.

As the editor-in-chief of I CARE IF YOU LISTEN, I have been receiving a growing number of submissions for reviews. As much as this is very exciting both for the magazine and for the new music scene at large—keep creating music!—I often witness the same mistakes that reduce one’s chances to be considered for review, and not only in our magazine and blog. So here are 10 things to consider when you’re submitting an album for review:

Third Stream, Threadgill and Sorey

Source: LRB blog.

But there is another way of thinking about the Third Stream: not as a movement, but as an elastic sensibility or structure of feeling among musicians who work along the increasingly porous borders between contemporary classical music and avant-garde jazz. Threadgill – who won the Pulitzer Prize in composition this year – is one of many jazz artists whose work could be described as Third Stream. The trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith is another. Both Threadgill and Smith are founding members of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, a black musicians’ collective established in Chicago in 1965. They never called their work ‘Third Stream’, but many of the AACM’s composers were steeped in contemporary classical music, particularly the work of Cage, Boulez and Stockhausen.

Salt Lake Electric Ensemble’s Stockhausen Recording Reviewed

English: Shiraz Arts Festival, Karlheinz Stock...

Source: The Utah Review.

The Salt Lake Electric Ensemble’s (SLEE) new recording and intuitive interpretation of one of the text compositions in From The Seven Days embraces the large-scale emotionalism of Stockhausen’s best musical instincts. In Set Sail for The Sun, SLEE, already having proven itself as an astute purveyor of musical egalitarianism both in performance and form, validates the composer’s acceptance of finding artistic value and merit in virtually every aspect of our daily lives and routines.

The Changing Tides of Hopscotch’s Avant-Garde

Matmos (M. C. [Martin] Schmidt and Drew Daniel...

Source: Indy Week, a discussion of the Hopscotch Music Festival, which takes place this weekend in North Carolina.

The 2013 iteration somehow managed to push the festival’s lineup further into strange territory, with improviser-in-residence Merzbow shattering my eardrums too many times to count. The best moments were, once again, the most visceral: Charlemagne Palestine‘s luminous piano chords; Pharmakon’s screeching walls of static; Matmos‘s transformation of sounds into objects into strangely compelling dance music; and on and on.