San Francisco Scene: April 15-21, 2016

USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay ...

From the Bay Improviser Calendar:

Friday, April 15

Fri 4/15 7:30 PM Center for New Music [55 Taylor St SF]
Guerrilla Composers Guild presents: Areon Flutes
Local champions Areon Flutes perform a set of brand new works in collaboration with the Guerrilla Composers Guild. Featured composers include Nick Benavides, Patrick Castillo, Eric Choate, Emma Logan, and Ryan Rey.

Fri 4/15 8:00 PM Old First Concerts [1751 Sacramento St. SF]
Mobius Trio
Robert Nance, guitar; Mason Fish, guitar; Matthew Holmes-Linder, guitar
Danny Clay a place that inhabits us
Belinda Reynolds Edges
Brendon Randall-Myers Making Good Choices
Anthony Porter needle-play
Robert Nance Plexus
Maurice Ravel, arr. Winton White String Quartet in F major – mvt. II. Très vif
Sergio Assad Kindergarten

Saturday, April 16

Sat 4/16 5:00 PM CCRMA [660 Lomita Dr. Stanford, CA 94305]
The 2016 series of California Electronic Music Exchange Concerts will be held at the campuses of UCSD, UCSB, Mills, Stanford, and CalArts. The Stanford leg of the exchange will be held on Saturday 16th with a slecetion of pieces from all the participating institutions.

Sat 4/16 8:00 PM All Saints Episcopal Church [555 Waverley St. Palo Alto, CA 94301]
Starlit Circumstances: Music for Voices, Electronics, and Kelp – The San Francisco Bay Area Chamber Choir, led by Anthony Pasqua will sing, hum, whisper, speak, and exclaim works by some of the most famous modern and contemporary composers. The centerpiece of the program will be Nereocystis III, a new piece for mixed voices, kelp horn, and electronics that the choir has commissioned from Bay Area composer, sound artist, and professor Krystyna Bobrowski.

Sat 4/16 8:00 PM Freight & Salvage [2020 Addison St. Berkeley]
Allison Miller’s Boom Tic Boom
With her band Boom Tic Boom, she’s put together exactly the right group, featuring Myra Melford on piano, Jenny Scheinman on violin, Todd Sickafoose on bass, and occasional special guests like Steven Bernstein, Erik Friedlander, Rachel Friedman, and Ara Anderson.

Sat 4/16 8:30 PM The Lab [2948 16th St SF]
Oxbow with Black Spirituals

Sunday, April 17

Sun 4/17 7:00 PM St. Mark’s Episcopal Church [2300 Bancroft Way Berkeley, CA 94704]
Starlit Circumstances: Music for Voices, Electronics, and Kelp: The San Francisco Bay Area Chamber Choir will sing, hum, whisper, speak, and exclaim works by some of the most famous modern and contemporary composers. The centerpiece of the program will be Nereocystis III, a new piece for mixed voices, kelp horn, and electronics that the choir has commissioned from Bay Area composer, sound artist, and professor Krystyna Bobrowski.

Monday, April 18

Mon 4/18 7:30 PM Mills College Ensemble Room [5000 MacArthur Blvd Oakland]
JENNIFER IVERSON
Music theorist Jennifer Iverson will give a talk titled “Invisible Collaboration: The Dawn of Electronic Music at the WDR,” which makes visible the engineers and technicians who helped the composers during a formative time in electronic music history in Cologne in the 1950s.

Mon 4/18 9:30 PM Studio Grand [3234 Grand Ave, Oakland]
Ghost and Spirit
Ben Goldberg, clarinets
Ila Cantor, electric guitar
Hamir Atwal, drums

Tuesday, April 19

Tue 4/19 7:30 PM CCRMA [660 Lomita Dr. Stanford CA 94305]
Qubit and CCRMA presents Chaise Èlectrique: An evening-length recital featuring French soloist, Séverine Ballon, with her interpretation of five adventurous works for violoncello and electronics.
“Electric Chair Music”, the working title for Brian Ferneyhough’s landmark Time and Motion Study II for singing cellist and electronics, was written in 1973-76. Already nearly forty years old, where is the medium of violoncello and electronics now? How is a younger generation of composers responding to this most traditional of instruments when confronting it with alien worlds of electronic sound?

Wednesday, April 20

Wed 4/20 6:00 PM Yerba Buena Center for the Arts [701 Mission St @3rd SF]
In Conversation with New Frequencies
New Frequencies Fest 2016 artists
A sneak-peek of the talent behind the music.

Wed 4/20 8:00 PM Second Act [1727 Haight St. SF]
Neha Spellfish, Demonsleeper, Thoabath, Malocculsion
Four twenny in the Haight Ashbury? Yup. If smoke makes the best sunsets, the banks of Golden Gate Park will be blowin’ up as Neha Spellfish, Malocculsion, play the final show with Demonsleeper and Thoabath before they hang ten off a dank ring blowing out toward San Juan, Puerto Rico where they’ll opena new venue for experimental live sound.

Thursday, April 21

Thu 4/21 7:00 PM Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) [2155 Center Street Berkeley, CA 94720]
An encounter with homemade and experimental instruments. Composer and instrument builder Paul Dresher brings his “omnivorous sensibility” (San Francisco Chronicle) to bear on works for his Quadrachord, joined by innovative percussionist Joel Davel on his Marimba Lumina. In addition, Edward Schocker performs on his own updated version of the glass harmonica, and multi-instrumentalist Laura Inserra creates a rich tapestry for the ears with instruments from around the world.

Thu 4/21 7:30 PM Berkeley Arts [2133 University Avenue Berkeley]
Free World ~ 3rd Thursdays
with
CONJURE!
con·jure: make (something) appear unexpectedly or seemingly from nowhere as if by magic
India Cooke, violin
Lewis Jordan, saxophone, word
Joe McKinley, contrabass
Kele Nitoto, percussion
Donald Robinson, set drum

Thu 4/21 8:00 PM Luggage Store Creative Music Series [1007 Market Street SF]
8pm Offing (Chris Duncan – electronics)
9pm Eric Glick Rieman – rhodes electric piano

Thu 4/21 8:00 PM CNMAT [1750 Arch Street Berkeley]
Qubit presents Chaise Èlectrique: An evening-length recital featuring French soloist, Séverine Ballon, with her interpretation of five adventurous works for violoncello and electronics. “Electric Chair Music”, the working title for Brian Ferneyhough’s landmark Time and Motion Study II for singing cellist and electronics, was written in 1973-76. Already nearly forty years old, where is the medium of violoncello and electronics now? How is a younger generation of composers responding to this most traditional of instruments when confronting it with alien worlds of electronic sound?

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