Music and More Reviews

From Music and More:

Mikołaj Trzaska/Devin Hoff/Michael Zerang – Sleepless in Chicago (NoBusiness, 2013)
Dave Rempis/Joshua Abrams/Avreeayl Ra – Aphelion (Aerophonic, 2013)

Advertisements

Arts for Art Evolving Series in NY

From Arts for Art, Inc.:

Shayna Dulberger 3
Shayna Dulberger 3 (Photo credit: michaelz1)

Monday Evolving Series
WHEN: Monday, 3 sets beginning at 7:30
WHERE: Clemente Soto Velez Cultural & Educational Center
107 Suffolk St – between Delancey & Rivington
TICKETS: $11 per set / $16 for two sets / $22 for three sets
students & seniors : $8 per set / $12 for two sets / $16 for three sets

Monday, February 10th :

Residency
Interviews:
Matt Lavelle by Shayna Dulberger
Ras Moshe by Shayna Dulberger
Shayna Dulberger by Ras Moshe

7:30 Free Jazz
Ras Moshe – sax
Matt Lavelle – trumpet
Shayna Dulberger – bass
Warren Smith – drums

8:45 Andrew Lamb Trio
Andrew Lamb – sax
Tom Abbs – bass
Warren Smith – drums

10:00 Kitamura-Laubrock-Filiano
Kyoko Kitamura – vocals
Ingrid Laubrock – sax
Ken Filiano – bass

Monday, February 17th :

7:30 A Poetic Piano Slide or TPP
Steve Dalachinsky – words
Connie Crothers – piano
Steve Swell – trombone

8:45 <>
Kris Davis – piano
Chris Tordini – bass
Devin Gray – drums/composition

10:00 Conly+Jones
Sean Conly – bass
Darius Jones – sax

Monday, February 24th :

7:30 Sikora/Chase
Catherine Sikora – sax
Brian Chase – drums

8:45 Nu-Band
Thomas Heberer – trumpet
Mark Whitecage – sax
Joe Fonda – bass
Lou Grassi – drums

10:00 Jason Kao Hwang Ensemble
Taylor Ho Bynum – cornet/flugelhorn
Andrew Drury – drums
Ken Filiano – string bass
Chris Forbes – piano
Jason Kao Hwang – composer/ violin/ viola

Roy Campbell Day Memorial

Wednesday, February 26
at Roulette, 509 Atlantic Ave. Brooklyn

6:45 Slide Show
Roy Campbell’s music

7:10 Intro Speak
Valerie Morris (Roy Campbell’s sister)

7:20 Opening Song – Prayer
(composed by William Parker on the death of R.Campbell’s father)
Fay Victor – voice
Charles Downs – drums
Andy Bemkey – piano
William Parker – bass, composition

7:30 Ahkenaten Ensemble
Brian Carrott – vibes
Hill Greene – bass
Jason Kao Hwang – violin
Warren Smith – drums

7:45 Speaker – Bob Craddock

7:50 Hempstead Music School
Donald Hanson – saxophone
Bruce Edwards – guitar
Hill Greene – bass
Chris Sullivan – bass
Bevin Turnbull – piano
Christine Bard – drums

8:05 Speaker
Matt Lavelle reading Roy Campbell’s poem

8:10 Piano
Stephanie Stone

8:15 Nemesis
Matt Lavelle – trumpet
Flip Barnes – trumpet
Asim Barnes – guitar
Warren Smith – drums

8:40 Speaker – William Parker

08:45 Charles Gayle Solo

8:50 Tazz Quartet
Joe McPhee – trumpet and sax
Andy Bemkey – piano
Chris Sullivan – bass
Michael T.A. Thompson – drums

9:00 Poetry – Steve Dalachinsky

9:05 NU Band
Mark Witecage – alto clarinet
Joe Fonda – bass
Lou Grassi – drums

9:20 Speak

9:25 4 for Roy
William Hooker- drums
Connie Crothers – piano
Daniel Carter – sax, trumpet
Ras Moshe – sax

9:40 Speak

9:45 Roy Campbell Film by O’Haire and Sternbach
Short documentary

10:00 Roy Campbell’s “Thanks to the Creator”
arranged & conducted by William Parker
Dave Douglas – trumpet
Lewis Barnes – trumpet
Matt Lavelle – trumpet
Taylor Ho Bynum – cornet
Ted Daniel – cornet
Graham Haynes – cornet
Joe Daley – tuba
Dave Hofstra – tuba
Steve Swell – trombone
Andrew Lamb – sax
Charles Gayle – sax
Mark Whitecage – sax
Avram Fefer – sax
Dave Sewelson – sax
Kali Fasteau – sax
Andrew Bemkey – piano
Jason Kao Hwang – violin
Hill Greene – bass
Chris Sullivan – bass
Henry Grimes – bass
Fay Victor – voice
Lisa Sokolov – voice

Epistrophy Arts keeps adventurous, avant-garde music alive in Austin

From CultureMap Austin:

English: Fred Frith, moers festival 2010
Fred Frith

When avant-garde guitar hero Fred Frith settled in with four effects pedals at his bare feet to perform for students at Austin Discovery School on Friday, January 31, the elementary school students weren’t the only ones excited. Local luminary Pedro Moreno, who organized Frith’s appearance at the school and subsequent show at North Door under the aegis of his grassroots Epistrophy Arts organization, was also smiling, thrilled at bringing the British innovator and improv master to Austin for the first time in nearly 30 years.

Jazz Listings From The New York Times

From NYTimes.com:

English: Barry Altschul, moers festival 2011
English: Barry Altschul, moers festival 2011 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Barry Altschul’s 3dom Factor (Wednesday) The drummer Barry Altschul, 71, has been a stealth eminence in jazz — known mainly within the avant-garde, and for music he made many years ago. But that’s changing, thanks to work like “The 3dom Factor,” his first album as a leader since the mid-’80s, which features the youngish saxophonist Jon Irabagon, who has been one agent of Mr. Altschul’s recent re-emergence, and the veteran bassist Joe Fonda, who has been another. At 8:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, Greenwich Village, 212-989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; $10 cover, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen)

Joel Harrison Five/Pannonia (Tuesday) Appearing on the adventurous Konceptions Music Series, Joel Harrison, a versatile and ever-productive guitarist, mingles new and old original music in a 10:30 p.m. set with Chris Cheek on tenor saxophone, Jacob Sacks on piano, Michael Bates on bass and Jordan Perlson on drums. An earlier set, at 9 p.m., features Pannonia, a chamber-like quartet led by the trumpeter Josh Deutsch, with Zach Brock on violin, Ryan Keberle on trombone and Gary Wang on bass. At Korzo, 667 Fifth Avenue, at 20th Street, Park Slope, konceptionsmusicseries.wordpress.com; $10 suggested donation, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen)

How Did John Zorn Write 300 Songs in 90 Days?

From Nicholas Tozier:

John Zorn
Cover of John Zorn

In 1990, New York-based composer John Zorn challenged himself to write one hundred tunes in one year’s time. Each of the hundred tunes would touch on the Jewish musical tradition, and would follow some basic guidelines: a maximum number of staves; the use of certain musical scales… and the tunes would have to be playable by any small ensemble of instruments. How could Zorn know, as he composed the Masada Songbook’s first short melody, that he was embarking on a project that would unfold over the next two decades of his life?