Chicago Scene: November 30 – December 14

David Fiuczynski, founder of Screaming Headles...
David Fiuczynski, founder of Screaming Headless Torsos. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a weekly overview of live avant performances in the Chicago area.  Contact us if you’d like your shows listed.

November 30:

7:00PM-11:00PM at the Rhythm Room, 1715 Maple Ave, Evanston IL, 847.491.9723
Jimmy Bennington Colour And Sound Trio with Charles Kirchen, Jeff Swanson

10:00PM at Martyrs’, 3855 N Lincoln, 773.404.9494 (wheelchair-accessible)
Rob Mazurek‘s Night Of The Volcano : : Rob Mazurek, Nick Mazzarella, Jeff Kowalkowski, Ben Boye, Leroy Bach, Matt Lux, Jason Roebke, Wayne Montana, Frank Rosaly, Dan Bitney, Todd Carter, Damon Locks

Deecmber 1:

8:30PM at Constellation, 3111 N Western
Dokuro
Guillermo Gregorio Ensemble, with Tom Curry, Daniel J Kempkers, Lilianna Wosko, Brian Labycz

10:00PM at the Hungry Brain, 2319 W Belmont, 773.709.1401 ($7) (wheelchair-accessible)
James Baker, Peter Maunu, Albert Wildeman, John Niekrasz
Pedway : Caroline Davis, Matthew Golombisky, Quin Kirchner — Record release

December 2:

9:00PM at Beat Kitchen, 2100 W Belmont, 773.281.4444 (wheelchair-accessible)
Extraordinary Popular Delusions : Jim Baker, Mars Williams, Brian Sandstrom, Steve Hunt

9:00PM at Webster’s Wine Bar, 1480 W Webster, 773.868.0608 (wheelchair-accessible)
Pedway : Caroline Davis, Matthew Golombisky, Quin Kirchner

December 3:

10:00PM at Bar DeVille, 701 N Damen, 312.929.2349 (wheelchair-accessible)
Pedway : Caroline Davis, Matthew Golombisky, Quin Kirchner

December 4:

9:30PM at Constellation, 3111 N Western (Free)
Jeff Kimmel, Tim Stine, Anton Hatwich

December 5:

7:00PM at the Logan Center Performance Penthouse, 915 E 60th, 773.702.ARTS (Free)
Listening party with Rudresh Mahanthappa

9:00PM at Multi Kulti, 1000 N Milwaukee, 4th Fl
Edward Wilkerson Jr, Jim Baker, Vincent Davis

9:00PM at Elastic, 2830 N Milwaukee, 2nd Fl, 773.772.3616
Anne La Berge, Katie Young, James Falzone, Brian Labycz, Jason Roebke

December 6:

7:30PM at the Logan Center for the Arts, 915 E 60th, 773.702.ARTS ($35-$5)
Gamak
Rudresh Mahanthappa Quartet with David Fiuczynski, François Moutin, Dan Weiss

7:30PM at Myopic Books, 1564 N Milwaukee, 773.862.4882
Keefe Jackson, Julian Kirchner

8:00PM at Experimental Sound Studio, 5925 N Ravenswood, 773.769.1069 ($10, or $30 series pass)
Oscillations Series
Bill MacKay, Matt Lux
Cinchel

9:00PM at Constellation, 3111 N Western ($10)
David Boykin, Alex Wing, with Dirty Sneakers Crew : Miss Sweet Feet, Bgurl Maya

December 7:

8:00PM at Graham Foundation (Madlener House), 4 W Burton Pl (Free, must RSVP)
Lampo Presents
Steve Hauschildt

9:00PM at Constellation, 3111 N Western
Paul Giallorenzo’s GitGO, with Mars Williams, Jeb Bishop, Anton Hatwich, Quin Kirchner
Keefe Jackson’s Likely So, with Jeff Kimmel, Jason Stein, Guillermo Gregorio, James Falzone, Dave Rempis, Mars Williams, Nick Mazzarella — Record release

December 8:

7:00PM at 32 Forty, 3240 S Morgan St ($12)
GunnelPumpers
SoSaLa
Doug Lofstrom and the New Quartet

8:00PM at Sugar Maple, 441 E Lincoln Ave, Milwaukee WI, 414.481.2393
Paul Giallorenzo’s GitGO, with Mars Williams, Jeb Bishop, Anton Hatwich, Quin Kirchner

8:30PM at Constellation, 3111 N Western
dark rooms
Third Coast Percussion : Sean Connors, Robert Dillon, Peter Martin, David Skidmore — music by Marcos Balter, Chris Fisher-Lochhead, Ted Hearne, Caroline Shaw, Daniel Wohl, Julia Wolfe

December 9:

7:30PM at Myopic Books, 1564 N Milwaukee, 773.862.4882 (Free)
Paul Bedal, Charlie Kirchen, Tim Daisy
9:00PM at Beat Kitchen, 2100 W Belmont, 773.281.4444 (wheelchair-accessible)
Extraordinary Popular Delusions : Jim Baker, Mars Williams, Brian Sandstrom, Steve Hunt

December 11:

10:00PM at the Hideout, 1354 W Wabansia, 773.227.4433 ($10)
Jim Baker, Joshua Abrams, Tatsuya Nakatani

December 12:

9:00PM at Multi Kulti, 1000 N Milwaukee, 4th Fl
Edward Wilkerson Jr, Jim Baker, Vincent Davis

9:00PM at the Empty Bottle, 1035 N Western, 773.276.3600 ($12) (wheelchair-accessible)
Disappears
Lichens
Implodes

9:00PM at Elastic, 2830 N Milwaukee, 2nd Fl, 773.772.3616
Avreeayl Ra Group : Steve Berry, Ed Wilkerson, Julia Millier, Elbio Barilari, Alex Duval, Harrison Bankhead, Avreeayl Ra

December 13:

7:30PM at the Borg Ward, 823 W National Ave, Milwaukee, WI ($7)
Tatsuya Nakatani, Hal Rammel

7:30PM at Transitions East, 2548 E 83rd, 773.221.7748
David Boykin Expanse with James Baker, Isaiah Spencer, Alex Wing
DJ Ayana Contreras
Girah Dahnee

8:30PM at Constellation, 3111 N Western ($18)
Kranky 20th Anniversary
Grouper
Benoît Pioulard
Christopher Bissonnette
Justin Walter

December 14:

7:00PM-11:00PM at the Rhythm Room, 1715 Maple Ave, Evanston IL, 847.491.9723
Jimmy Bennington Colour And Sound Trio with Charles Kirchen, Dan Pierson

8:30PM at Constellation, 3111 N Western ($18)
Kranky 20th Anniversary
Tim Hecker
Pan American
Keith Fullerton Whitman
Ken Camden

For more information, such as show times and directions, as well as upcoming performances, see:

http://now-is.org/
http://www.ratchetmusic.com
http://www.umbrellamusic.org
http://www.mcachicago.org
http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/dca/supp_info/chicago_culturalcenterschedule.html
http://www.skylarkchicago.com
http://www.hideoutchicago.com
http://www.elasticrevolution.com
http://www.myopicbookstore.com/music.html
http://www.lampo.org
http://dalniente.com
http://iceorg.org/events/category/chicago
http://www.emptybottle.com/

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AMN Interviews: Patrick Farmer

13Patrick Farmer is an artist working with composition. He was born in Beckenham, Kent in 1983. His mother bought him his first drum kit when he was twelve and eight years later he spent six months in India studying Hindustani Tabla with Pandit Nayan Ghosh. Still most often referred to as a percussionist, though he hasn’t performed on a drum kit for years, Farmer will commonly enlist the help of a drum or turntable to act as a resonator for natural materials or filtering field recordings. Lately he has been using the motors of a reel to reel player in preparation for his tour with Stephen Cornford.

He is a founding member of the Set Ensemble, a group based in the UK dedicated to the performance of experimental music, especially that of the Wandelweiser group, and co-founded the online record label, Compost and Height, and Wolf Notes journal, with Sarah Hughes in 2008. As of October 2012 patrick began studying towards his Ph.D at Oxford Brookes.

Patrick has performed with artists such as Angharad Davies, Lee Patterson, David Lacey, Matt Davis, Jason Kahn, Christian Munthe, Anders Dahl, Will Guthrie, and Rhodri Davies. He has a long-standing duo with double bassist Dominic Lash, with Sarah Hughes and Daniel Jones he is a member of the improvising trio ‘Loris’, and he is part of, along with Stephen Cornford and Sarah Hughes, ‘The Albion Players’, whom recently performed excerpts of Ben Owen’s ‘Geese’ and George Brecht’s ‘Water Yam’ at the Lost and Found series in Oxford and London. In February 2012 Farmer was part of the exhibition, ‘new works’, with Manfred Werder and Ben Owen, curated by Sarah Hughes, at the Old Fire Station in Oxford.

Patrick took time out of his busy schedule to answer a few of our questions.

Your association with the Wandelweiser group is longstanding. What was it about the Wandelweiser aesthetic or ethos that attracted you?

Getting to know certain members, or people associated with the collective, has for me been the most important experience. One that has had quite an affect on how I consider and think about the performances and realisations I have been lucky enough to be part of up until this point, though I wouldn’t call myself a Wandelweiser musician. Neither would I say my association has been particularly longstanding, as I feel like I’m only just beginning to understand what it was I was doing a few years ago with these wonderful people’s compositions. I don’t think anything particularly profound drew me to the group, much as ever it was simply a matter of keeping my eyes and ears open, and luck. Like so many people say, these days I’m not even sure what is and isn’t associated with them directly or indirectly, particularly in the world I am part of, which is much more to do with the live performance of such pieces than any kind of recorded media. I’ve voiced my feelings concerning my thought processes behind the performance of scores, as fundamentally different to my thought process, or lack of, with regards to improvising, so I wont bore you with that here, but I will say that currently, and this is as a direct result of being involved in all these activities over the years, I am writing pieces for instrumentation that is much more fixed. Pieces for electronics primarily, and objects; for processes of specific amplification that may or may not fall away to new events. Without spending so much time with the musics of, for example, Antoine Beuger, Michael Pisaro, and Stefan Thut, over the last few years, I highly doubt I’d be thinking the way I do about such things. I suppose that’s the beautiful thing about such a closely knit yet hugely diverse group, because it’s not only the composers of the group that have had such direct influence on me, but the people with whom I have worked on their music so closely over the last few years. The times spent discussing and realising approaches with Dominic Lash and Sarah Hughes have been just as if not more important than anything else I can think of. And so as ever, it is primarily a social engagement that has drawn me to Wandelweiser, and kept me there.

You’ve been quite involved in producing field recordings. Can you tell us a bit about what got you interested in doing field recordings?

Who knows how many people have heard this story, I apologise to those of you who have, but I don’t think it’s ever been written down. It comes down to luck and attention, once again. I grew up in Wales, thus I spent much of my time out of doors, and I was lucky enough to be in a band with two individuals I still count as very close friends. At that time, about twelve years ago, we were experimenting with our eyes and ears closed, it was really rather wonderful to have no idea what it was we were doing or why on earth we were doing it, but to still feel so utterly compelled and alive whilst doing it. Things like throwing stones at resonant fences with our tape players positioned as close to the source as we could, which never went well, or burying said tape players under mounds of stones and then sliding and jumping down them, which again was the cause of many a hospitalised technology. We weren’t using these recordings for anything, we didn’t have a purpose beyond the activity itself, and I still have many of these recordings, in fact, I probably have about 50 tapes worth of such things, and I’m sure I’m not alone in possessing such an adolescent archive. The first, more conscious field recording, didn’t occur until a wee while later. I seem to remember that at the time I was quite enthralled by Jon Rose‘s bowed fences project, and I’d often drive to the Elan Valley – one of many places in Wales where you can record without interruption, which at the time at least, was what I was after – and stick my contact microphones on the fence, and then basically copy Jon Rose by bowing the wires with all sorts of materials. It sounds a little cloying I admit, but on one occasion, it was a particularly windy day, I stopped bowing the fence but could still hear a tone through my headphones. And it went from there. For years I’d stick a microphone to anything I possibly could, I even stuck a microphone inside a freshly baked cake once.

I’m trying to think of individuals that got me interested however. Very early on I do remember being fascinated by Tom Waits dragging a chair along the ground during one of the songs in SwordFishTrombone, I can’t remember which, but I loved the integration of such seemingly mundane objects and actions into the songwriting process. Waits was somewhat of a diving board for me. Jeph Jerman I’m sure was an influence early on (sorry, I’m really struggling to remember), especially the near absence that technology has in his recordings. Oh, Lee Patterson! Of course, meeting that chap had quite an effect on me, still does, he’s a very kind gentleman who is always willing to chat about experiences, sound and all their digressions. I guess again, in many ways, much of what drew me to field recording, beyond the sound itself, were the people. I’ve never really performed live with field recordings, not really, once or twice perhaps, and early on, much of the reason I spent so much time out of doors, was to gather and collect material for improvisatory performances, recording said material in the place I found it, at the time, was a good way of understanding what I could then do with it back home.

You’ve recently published try i bark, a volume of writing that seems to map a borderland between poetry and prose. I wonder what connection, if any, do you see between your work with language and your work with sound?

I really can’t say I see much of a connection between the two. Beyond an event, me going deaf in my right ear, that caused me to write more and play less. Which if anything creates yet further distance does it not? It’s all part of a balance, as I spend more time outdoors, writing, I spend more time indoors, recording and investigating (right now it’s a reel to reel player.) Perhaps that will shift, it probably will, but I can’t say that I’m all that interested in the possibility of a conjunction. Both processes are part of very different worlds for me, they provide some sort of evidence that sound is a part of as many worlds as the mind is capable of imagining.

Jazz Improvise Meeting Festival in China

Aki Takase
Aki Takase (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As far as I can gather, the Jazz Improvise Meeting Festival takes place 11st – 14th / Dec (Shenzhen) – Q Cafe/999Royal Suites&Tower, Today Club/OCAT, 11st – 14th / Dec (Beijing) – Shaw Modern Art University, Today Art Musuem, and 7th, 12nd – 14th / Dec (Shanghai) Power Station Of Art.

The lineup includes:

Aki Takase
Gebhard Ullmann Clarinet
Klima Kalima
Michael Schiefel
Rolf Sudmann
Peter Brötzmann Full Blast Trio

And possibly others.

Monsieur Délire Reviews

From Monsieur Délire:

FANNY LASFARGUES / Solo (Coax Records)
RADIATION 10 / Bossa Super Nova (Coax Records)
STAER / Daughters (Horse Arm – merci à/thanks to Dense Promotion)
ROM • SCHAERER • EBERLE / At the Age of Six I Wanted to Be a Cook (Unit Records)
ZEVIOUS / Passing Through the Wall (Cuneiform)
CHRISTOPH GALLIO & BEAT STREULI / Road Works (Percaso)
DUSAN JEVTOVIC / An I Walking Wrong? (Moonjune)
DEWA BUDJANA / Joged Kahyangan (Moonjune)
COPERNICUS / L’Éternité immédiate (Nervermore)
THE CLAUDIA QUINTET / September (Cuneiform)
CHROME HOOF / Chrome Black Gold (Cuneiform)
21 / 21 (Coax Records)
METAL-O-PHONE / Kosmos (Coax Records)
BRIGITTE FONTAINE / Brigitte Fontaine est… folle! (Superior Viaduct)
BRIGITTE FONTAINE / Comme à la radio (Superior Viaduct)

Arraymusic in December

From Toronto’s Arraymusic:

Array Session #20
Thursday Dec. 5, 2013 @8 pm
The Array Space, 155 Walnut Street. second floor, M6J 3W3

An evening of improvisation by some of Toronto’s finest musicians along with their friends and guests from out-of-town heralds a return to the Columbia U Radio jams or the great tradition of CCMC Music Gallery evenings.

This week’s lineup:
Branko Dzinovic – accordion
Dimitar Pentchev – piano
Nate Robertson – tribal/ambient
Rick Sacks – percussion

The Array Songbook; A Fundraiser
Sunday, Dec. 15, 3pm
Array Space 155 Walnut Ave
Toronto, On, M6J 3W3

Allen Cole’s music has been a big part of Array since the world premiere of his musical The Worng Son at the Natioanal Arts Centre in Ottawa in the Fall of 2008. Since then Allen has written another musical mixing contemporary compositional practices and a brilliant ear for melody and orchestration. Songs by Allen Cole, Rick Sacks, Linda Catlin Smith, Kurt Weill and more.

James Tenney – The Signal Itself
Friday, Dec. 6, 8pm
pre-concert talk at 7:15
The Array Space
155 Walnut Avenue
Toronto, On, M6J 3W3
“…what I want to be understood is just the message itself, the signal itself. It’s not about something else. It’s simply the basis for an experience.” – from an interview with James Tenney by Ciarán Maher, MusicWorks Issue 77 (2000)

The Stone in December

Joe Lovano, Newport Jazz Festival, 7/14/05
Joe Lovano, Newport Jazz Festival, 7/14/05 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From New York’s Stone:

12/1 Sunday (MJC)
8 and 10 pm
John Zorn’s METEMPSYCHOMAGIA
Aram Bajakian, Eyal Maoz (guitars) Shanir Blumenkranz (bass) Kenny Grohowski (drums)

12/3 Tuesday (RJP)
8 pm
Super Sonix (from Cleveland)
Joe Lovano (sax) Jeff Anastasia (bass) Anthony Lovano (drums)

10 pm
Super Sonix (from Cleveland)
Joe Lovano (sax) Judi Silvano (vocals) Michael Bocian (guitar) Jeff Anastasia (bass) Anthony Lovano (drums)

12/4 Wednesday (HM)
8 pm
Joe Lovano and Kenny Werner Duo
Joe Lovano (sax) Kenny Werner (piano)
TWENTY DOLLARS

10 pm
Joe Lovano, Kenny Werner and Andrew Cyrille Trio
Joe Lovano (sax) Kenny Werner (piano) Andrew Cyrille (drums)
TWENTY DOLLARS

12/5 Thursday (ICS)
8 and 10 pm
Loft Ensemble Improvisations
Joe Lovano (sax) Judi Silvano (vocals) Billy Drewes (woodwinds, percussion) Ron Kozak (woodwinds) Tim Hagans (trumpet) Michael Bocian (guitar) Scott Lee, Ed Schuller, Ratzo B. Harris (basses) Bob Meyer (drums)
TWENTY DOLLARS

12/6 Friday (HM)
8 and 10 pm
Joe Lovano, Milford Graves Duo
Joe Lovano (sax) Milford Graves (drums)
TWENTY FIVE DOLLARS

12/7 Saturday (DDT)
8 pm
The Village Rhythm Band
Joe Lovano (sax) Liberty Ellman (guitar) Matthew Garrison (bass) Abdou Mboup (percussion) Otis Brown III (drums)
TWENTY DOLLARS

12/8 Sunday (SK)
8 and 10 pm
Saxophone Explosion
Joe Lovano (sax) Lawrence Fields (piano) Peter Slavov (bass) Lamy Istrefi (drums) and some special guest saxophonists
TWENTY DOLLARS

12/10 Tuesday (KR)
8 and 10 pm
Daniel Zamir and Shai Maestro Duo
Daniel Zamir (sax) Shai Maestro (piano)

12/11 Wednesday (KR)
8 and 10 pm
Daniel Zamir Acoustic Quartet
Daniel Zamir (sax)

12/12 Thursday (ICS)
8 and 10 pm
Daniel Zamir Electric Band
Daniel Zamir (sax)

12/14 Saturday (SC)
8 and 10 pm
SATLAH reunion
Daniel Zamir (sax) Shanir Blumenkranz (bass) Kevin Zubek (drums)

12/15 Sunday (JR)
8 and 10 pm
Middle East Free Improv
Daniel Zamir (sax) and many special guests

12/17 Tuesday (BS)
8 pm
Phantom Orchard
Ikue Mori (electronics) Zeena Parkins (harps, keys)

10 pm
Phantom Orchard Quintet
Ikue Mori (electronics) Koichi Makigami (vocal) Zeena Parkins (harp) Cyro Baptista (percussion) Erik Friedlander (cello)

12/18 Wednesday (RJP)
8 pm
Kibyoshi
Ikue Mori (visual, electronics) Koichi Makigami (vocal, theremin, mouth harp) Ned Rothenberg (shakuhachi)

10 pm
Ikue Mori Solo with visuals and music
Ikue Mori (visual, electronics)

12/19 Thursday (DDT)
8 pm
Mephista
Ikue Mori (electronics) Sylvie Courvoisier (piano) Susie Ibarra (drums)

10 pm
Mephista with Lotte Anker
Ikue Mori (electronics) Sylvie Courvoisier (piano) Susie Ibarra (drums) Lotte Anker (sax)

12/20 Friday (TY)
8 and 10 pm
SPECIAL SURPRISE BAND
members will be announced in december

12/21 Saturday (RK)
8 pm
Ikue Mori, Fred Frith, Lotte Anker
Ikue Mori (electronics) Fred Frith (guitar) Lotte Anker (sax)

10 pm
Ikue Mori, Fred Frith, Lotte Anker, JIm Black
Ikue Mori (electronics) Fred Frith (guitar) Lotte Anker (sax) Jim Black (drums)

12/22 Sunday (HM)
8 pm
Ikue Mori and John Zorn Duo
Ikue Mori (electronics) John Zorn (sax)
TWENTY DOLLARS

10 pm
Ikue Mori and Fred Frith Duo
Ikue Mori (electronics) Fred Frith (guitar)
TWENTY DOLLARS

12/25 Wednesday (BLG)
8 pm
CHRISTMAS DAY IMPROV NIGHT—A STONE BENEFIT
John Zorn (sax) Ikue Mori (electronics) Ches Smith (drums) Uri Caine (piano) Chuck Bettis (electronics) Nonoko Yoshida (sax) David Watson (guitar) Sylvie Courvoisier (piano) Mark Feldman (violin) Chris Otto (violin)
TWENTY FIVE DOLLARS

12/26 Thursday (GCP)
8 pm
JOHN ZORN IMPROV NIGHT—A STONE BENEFIT
John Zorn (sax) Ned Rothenberg (sax) Marty Ehrlich (sax) Tim Keiper (drums) Chris Speed (reeds) Anthony Coleman (piano) Steve Swell (trombone) Ty Citerman (guitar) Zeena Parkins (harp)
TWENTY FIVE DOLLARS

12/27 Friday (SC)
8 pm
JOHN ZORN IMPROV NIGHT—A STONE BENEFIT
John Zorn (sax) Uri Gurvich (sax) Eyal Maoz (guitar) Ron Anderson (guitar) Chris Cochrane (guitar) Sylvie Courvoisier (piano) Ikue Mori (electronics) Shanir Blumenkranz (bass) Michael Nicolas (cello) Don McKenzie (drums)
TWENTY FIVE DOLLARS

12/28 Saturday (JI)
8 pm
JOHN ZORN IMPROV NIGHT—A STONE BENEFIT
John Zorn (sax) Jeremiah Cymerman (clarinet) Jon Madof (guitar) Dave Scanlon (guitar) Annie Gosfield (keyboards) Frank London (trumpet) Adam Rudolph (percussion) Brian Marsella (keyboards) Billy Martin (percussion) Briggan Krauss (sax)
TWENTY FIVE DOLLARS

12/29 Sunday (DS)
8 pm
JOHN ZORN IMPROV NIGHT—A STONE BENEFIT
John Zorn (sax) Thurston Moore (guitar) Mary Halvorson (guitar) James Ilgenfritz (bass) Joe Morris (guitar) Okkyung Lee (cello) Erik Friedlander (cello) Jay Campbell (cello) Pauline Kim (violin) Brian Chase (drums) Craig Taborn (piano)
TWENTY FIVE DOLLARS

12/31 Tuesday (RK)
8 pm
Thurston Moore and John Zorn New Year’s Duo
Thurston Moore (guitar) John Zorn (sax)
TWENTY FIVE DOLLARS

10 pm to 1 am
THURSTON MOORE’S NEW YEAR’S EVE DOUBLE BILL!
10 pm: Thurston Moore, Mike Watt, Raymond Pettibone Trio
1130 pm: Chelsea Light Moving
10 pm: Thurston Moore (guitar) Mike Watt (bass) Raymond Pettibon (microphone)
1130 pm: Thurston Moore (guitar) Samara Lubelski (bass, violin) John Moloney (drums) Keith Wood (guitar)

AMN Reviews: Bionular – Theatre Music (Oniron)

Two tragedies, one based on Shakespeare´s tale of Roman class struggle updated to address the politics and media of our young century, the other a “monodrama” by a vicitim of childhood sexual abuse. Bionulor (Sebastian Banaszczyk, himself a professional actor) always stamps his music “100% sound recycling,” in these cases of classical instruments for the former and monologist Sylwia Oksiuta´s voice the latter.

Both albums, separately packed but released as the matching set Theatre Music, appear to feature the entire scores of their respective plays, dozens of cues as short as fifteen seconds each. Coriolanus wavers between dreamlike acoustics and cold, hard data bursts and features a fat, juicy ten-minute drone at its midst. SKAZAna is one-third the length of Coriolanus but about three times as abstract, sounding hermetically tight and secretive, perhaps a fitting soundtrack to a public confession of guilt, assault and shame. A music box theme late in the playing order strikes a poignant chord.

Played at home, Coriolanus succeeds better as a narrative with its thicker, brighter scarlet thread and recurring motifs, though both are served well when simply experineced as light shifting from one panel to the next in a stained glass window.

http://bionulor.bigcartel.com/product/bionulor-theatre-music-2-cds-set

Stephen Fruitman