Uncertainty Music Series Upcoming Concerts

Alison Knowles in San Francisco, CA in 2011
Alison Knowles in San Francisco, CA in 2011 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From New Haven’s Uncertainty Music Series:

Saturday 14 September 2013
8pm
Daniel Levin (cello) + Juan Pablo Carletti (drums) DUO
+ Arabian Blade (Christopher Donofrio & Donovan Fazzino)
+ Theremin and Lap Steel Duo
at Never Ending Books
810 State St
New Haven, CT

Saturday 28 September 2013
8pm
Cellist Charles Curtis performs new works by Éliane Radigue, Tashi Wada, Alvin Lucier, Alison Knowles, and Christian Wolff
at The BIG ROOM
319 Peck St
New Haven, CT

Saturday 12 October 2013
8pm
Jonah Parzen-Johnson Solo + Banjo Assault (Tom Crean + Matt Robidoux)
at Never Ending Books
810 State St
New Haven, CT

Saturday 8 November 2013
8pm
TBA
at Never Ending Books
810 State St
New Haven, CT

Saturday 14 December 2013
8pm
Joe Moffett/Kristin Slipp Duo + Jacket Thor (Ryan Kalentkowski)
at Never Ending Books
810 State St
New Haven, CT

Long Sidewalks featuring Jeb Bishop with Jeff Albert, Rex Gregory, Ray Moore, Helen Gillet, Chris Alford, Jesse Morrow, and Marcello Benetti in NOLA

English: Jeb Bishop, moers festival 2010
English: Jeb Bishop, moers festival 2010 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From New Orleans’ Open Ears Music:

What: Long Sidewalks featuring Jeb Bishop with Jeff Albert, Rex Gregory, Ray Moore, Helen Gillet, Chris Alford, Jesse Morrow, and Marcello Benetti

When: Tuesday September 17, 2013 at 10 pm

Where: The Blue Nile, 532 Frenchmen St, New Orleans, LA

More info at http://noise-nola.org or http://openearsmusic.org or contact Jeff Albert (504) 315-5167 or jeff@noise-nola.org

New Orleans International Sound Exchange in conjunction with the Open Ears Music Series is proud to present Long Sidewalks in concert at The Blue Nile (532 Frenchmen St, New Orleans) on Tuesday, September 17, 2013, at 10 PM. Long Sidewalks is a musical group assembled by trombonists Jeb Bishop and Jeff Albert. In 2006, Bishop and Albert formed the critically acclaimed band Lucky 7s, as a way to bring together members of the New Orleans and Chicago musical communities (visit http://www.lucky7s.org for more info on that band). Long Sidewalks is the New Orleans based next step in their collaboration, and will feature Bishop on trombone, Albert on trombone and laptop, Rex Gregory and Ray Moore on woodwinds, Helen Gillet on cello, Chris Alford on guitar, Jesse Morrow on bass, and Marcello Benetti on drums.

New Sounds: Masada Marathon Special Podcast

Concert of "Masada": Joey Baron (dr)...

From New Sounds:

On the occasion of his 60th birthday, Zorn came by the studio to present music from just some of the recordings of The Book of Angels. The two Johns, Zorn and Schaefer, picked a bunch of music (see pic below) – too much to fit into one New Sounds show. So the remaining songs are included here (with a few extras) on this New Sounds special podcast.

Free Jazz Blog Reviews

English: Japanese avant-garde jazz pianist and...

From Free Jazz:

Peter Brötzmann/Steve Noble: I am here where are you (Trost, 2013) ****
Satoko Fujii – Gen Himmel (Libra, 2013) ****½
Henri Roger – Exsurgences (IMR, 2012) ****
Thollem McDonas – Dear Future (Wild Silence, 2013) ***½
John Medeski – A Different Time (Sony, 2013) **½
Aki Takase – My Ellington (Intakt, 2013) ***½
Matthew Shipp – Solos – The Jazz Sessions (Original Spin, 2012) ***
Christian Wallumrød Ensemble: Outstairs (ECM, 2012) ****
Sifter: Self-titled (Relative Pitch, 2013) ****½
JC Jones – Citations – Solo Bass (Kadima, 2012) ****
Bester Quartet: The Golden Land ****
Jon Madof – Zion80 (Tzadik, 2013) ****
Gabriele Coen Jewish Experience – Yiddish Melodies in Jazz (Tzadik, 2013) **½
Massacre: Love me tender (Tzadik, 2013) ***½
John Zorn: Filmworks XXV – City of Slaughter/Schmatta/Beyond the Infinite (Tzadik, 2013) ****

Pharoah Sanders and Wadada Leo Smith at Guelph Reviewed

Wadada
Wadada (Photo credit: andynew)

From The Globe and Mail:

Saturday night’s marquee double-bill at the Guelph Jazz Festival was a study in the contrariness of the form. Both parts featured jazz masters in their early 70s. In the first half, a closely knit virtuoso ensemble played gorgeous compositions with precision and grace but, for this listener at least, it was a chore to get through; in the second half, an improbable conglomeration of a legend with a younger gang of sonic futurists went on a haphazard trip full of slack segments and clashes of intentions, and it was perpetually riveting.