Jazz Listings From The New York Times

Wadada Leo Smith
Wadada Leo Smith (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From NYTimes.com:

Rudresh Mahanthappa’s ‘Gamak’ (Thursday) Mr. Mahanthappa, an alto saxophonist with a roving intellect and a bladelike articulation, presents the impressive band from “Gamak,” his new album on the ACT label. A special spotlight shines on his guitarist, David Fiuczynski; anchoring the group is the quick-reflex rhythm team of François Moutin on bass and Dan Weiss on drums. At 7:30 p.m., Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker Street, near Thompson Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 505-3474, lepoissonrouge.com; $15 in advance, $18 day of show, free for members. (Chinen)

John Medeski (Wednesday) Best known as the analog keyboard wizard and first among equals in Medeski Martin & Wood, Mr. Medeski has a contemplative new album, “A Different Time” (OKeh), made alone with minimal enhancements on an antique French piano. He celebrates the album’s release with this solo concert, featuring an opening set by the groove-minded saxophonist Lakecia Benjamin. At 7 p.m., Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker Street, near Thompson Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 505-3474, lepoissonrouge.com; $25 in advance, $30 day of show, free for members. (Chinen)

Mostly Other People Do the Killing (Friday) This impudent but wickedly proficient free-bop quartet — led by the bassist Moppa Elliott, with the trumpeter Peter Evans, the saxophonist Jon Irabagon and the drummer Kevin Shea — tweaks its lineup here, and tightens its focus. The band will enlist Bryan Murray on tenor saxophone (filling in for Mr. Irabagon), as well as Dave Taylor on bass trombone, Brandon Seabrook on banjo and Ron Stabinsky on piano. This larger ensemble, previously billed as the Hot Cup Chili Pepper 7, will play fresh arrangements of 1920s and ’30s jazz fare. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; $20 cover, includes one drink. (Chinen)

Miles Okazaki and Dan Weiss (Sunday) The ambitious guitarist-composer Miles Okazaki recently released a thrillingly heady album, “Figurations” (Sunnyside), recorded live with a band that includes Dan Weiss on drums. Here as on a smattering of recent engagements, Mr. Okazaki and Mr. Weiss interact as a duo, drawing on a wealth of information and an array of strategic angles. At 8:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; $20 cover, includes one drink. (Chinen)

Matthew Shipp Residency (Friday through Sunday) A restive and probing pianist, Matthew Shipp works in several settings this week, including his trio with the bassist Michael Bisio and the drummer Whit Dickey (on Friday and Saturday). At 8 and 10 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; $10 for each set. (Chinen)

Wadada Leo Smith and Angelica Sanchez (Saturday) Last year Mr. Smith, a trumpeter, composer and tireless synthesizer of musical languages, released “Ten Freedom Summers” (Cuneiform), an album inspired by the push toward civil rights. He’ll draw down the scale of his ambition, but probably not his level of intensity, during this duo concert with Ms. Sanchez, the pianist in his Golden Quartet, and a searching improviser and composer in her own right. At 8 p.m., Greenwich House Music School, 46 Barrow Street, West Village, (212) 242-4770, greenwichhouse.org; $20, $15 for students. (Chinen)

Tomas Fujiwara & the Hook Up (Saturday) A drummer working along jazz’s experimental fringe, Mr. Fujiwara favors a mode of playing that’s forward-leaning but rarely blunt or aggressive, and never random. He has made two strong albums with this band, which features the trumpeter Jonathan Finlayson, the saxophonist Brian Settles, the guitarist Mary Halvorson and the bassist Trevor Dunn; this gig, which has Adam Hopkins filling in for Mr. Dunn, will also feature some music destined for a third album. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; $20 cover, includes one drink. (Chinen)

Classical Music Listings From The New York Times

English: Tyondai_Braxton, moers festival 2008
English: Tyondai_Braxton, moers festival 2008 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From NYTimes.com:

Alarm Will Sound (Saturday) The fearless new-music ensemble performs works by established and young contemporary composers, including “Fly by Wire,” an exploration of concepts of turbulence and stability in music by the multi-instrumentalist and composer Tyondai Braxton. That work will have its premiere, alongside works by Charles Wuorinen, David Lang, John Orfe and Donnacha Dennehy, whose “Hunger,” inspired by the Irish potato famine, will be sung by Rachel Calloway. At 9 p.m., Zankel Hall, Carnegie Hall, (212) 247-7800, carnegiehall.org; $38 and $44. (Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim)

American Composers Orchestra (Friday) This dedicated new-music orchestra, conducted by George Manahan, tunnels down for another exploration of boundary-pushing symphonic music. This public workshop offers readings of new works by Du Yun, Judith Sainte Croix, Dan Visconti, Troy Herion and Ray Lustig. At 7:30 p.m., Zankel Hall, Carnegie Hall, (212) 247-7800, carnegiehall.org; $40 and $50. (da Fonseca-Wollheim)

Cutting Edge Concerts New Music Festival (Monday) The composer Victoria Bond’s festival of new music continues with works by four contemporary composers, including her own humorous “Page Turner” and Hannah Lash’s “Eight Songs for a Stoned Prince,” based on drunken phone calls by Britain’s Prince Harry. The flamboyant pianist Kathleen Supové and the “lung-powered” vocal and instrumental ensemble Loadbang perform. At 7:30 p.m., Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, at 95th Street, (212) 864-5400, symphonyspace.org; $20, $15 for students. (da Fonseca-Wollheim)

AMN Reviews: Tinku – Double Excellence (Buh)

Genuinely weird and charming. Peruvian percussionist Efrain Rozas found a kindred spirit in audio-visual artist Megan Moncrief in New York and Tinku´s debut “Double Excellence” was born, a deliberately lo-fi set of ramshackle, gonzo ethnomusicology for electronics, Latin percussion and sounds of “enigmatic origin”, which would seem to be just about anything you might find in a prop comic´s trunk. A postmodern Punch and Judy show, Rozas and Moncrief put on a series of slapstick encounters, taking tumbles and seeing how long they can hold their balance.

Stumbling onstage dazed and confused with “Double Failure”, they hit their stride with “Guaracha del Infierno”, an arrhythmic tropicália with dyspeptic piano. The titles keep getting sillier but I dare say their ambition grows with each passing track. “Lady Gaga Studied Here?” is a very small symphony in three movements for percussion (including steel drums) and scraping and scuffing. “R.I.P. Shorty” assembles itself into a kind of melody – you can actuallly sway to it. The final, title track is an engrossing, nine-minute long, spooky, invisible kabuki.

http://buhrecords.blogspot.se/search/label/releases

Stephen Fruitman

Newsbits: Robert Dick / Karl Berger in New York / Gareth Flowers and Others / Groder and Miano in Orlando

English: Peter Josyph
English: Peter Josyph (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Part 2 of a Robert Dick interview is available.

Karl Berger‘s Improvisers Orchestra at El Taller will perform Thursday, April 4 at El Taller, 2710 Broadway (104th St). 7:30 Workshop/Rehearsal, 9:00 Performance.

Saturday April 26, 2013 at The Village Zendo, 588 Broadway, New York, NY 10012, Suite 1108, will feature: Batteries Duo –Gareth Flowers, trumpet and Josh Frank, electronics, and The Way of the Trumpet – Tim Hagans, trumpet and Peter Josyph, actor/author.

The Southeast premiere of the “FluiDensity” project from Brian Groder and Tonino Miano at the Timucua White House, April 7