Classical Music Listings From The New York Times

English: Franco Donatoni
English: Franco Donatoni (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

From NYTimes.com:

Deviant Septet (Thursday) An exciting young ensemble that proposes to realize the promise Stravinsky saw in his instrumentation for his “Histoire du Soldat,” the Deviant Septet presents the premiere of 12 new pieces inspired by Stockhausen’s “Tierkreis” and its astrological associations. At 8 p.m., Greenwich House Music School, 46 Barrow Street, West Village, (212) 242-4770, greenwichhouse.org; $15, $10 for students and 65+. (Steve Smith)

Lukas Ligeti (Thursday) This composer and percussionist has many musical interests, and composes in a variety of styles, unified by his clear personal voice. This time Mr. Ligeti is experimenting with jazz, playing drums in an ensemble that includes Leron Thomas on trumpet, Travis Sullivan on saxophone and Evan Lipson on bass. At 8 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; $10. (Kozinn)

Locrian Chamber Players (Thursday) This ensemble has a rigorous definition of “new music” — only performing works composed in the last decade. Here they offer recent pieces (including two premieres) by Judith Weir, Ned Rorem, Jason Freeman, Russell Platt, Rita Ueda, Yao Chen and David Macdonald. At 8 p.m., Riverside Church, 10th floor performance space, Riverside Drive, at 122nd Street, Morningside Heights, (914) 923-5511, locrian.org; free. (Schweitzer)

New York New Music Ensemble (Tuesday) To close its 35th anniversary season, this virtuosic ensemble offers a program that includes two scores written for the ensemble in the last five years — Anneliese Van Parys’s “Fragrances” (2008) and Philippe Hurel’s “Step” (2007) — as well as a pair of older scores, Franco Donatoni’s “Ave” (1987) and Gérard Grisey’s “Vortex Temporum” (1996). At 8 p.m., Merkin Concert Hall, 129 West 67th Street, (212) 501-3330, kaufman-center.org; $20, $10 for students. (Kozinn)

Prism Quartet (Thursday) This consistently stimulating saxophone quartet ends its season with a characteristically enterprising overview of Minimalism, featuring works by two founding fathers of the style, Terry Riley and Philip Glass, and by two latter-day composers who applied its lessons, John Adams and Michael Torke. Completing the program is a new piece by Samuel Phillips-Corwin, the winner of the Prism Quartet/Walden School Commissioning award. At 7:30 p.m., Leonard Nimoy Thalia, Symphony Space, 2537 Broadway, at 95th Street, (212) 864-5400, symphonyspace.org; $21, $15 for students and 65+. (Smith)

Stefano Scodanibbio Tribute Concert (Friday) Until his death from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease) in January, Stefano Scodanibbio was widely admired among new-music circles as a prodigious double bassist, a fascinating composer and a bold improviser. Honoring him here are the bassist Scott Dixon, the violinist Benjamin Kreith, the bass-flutist Matteo Cesari and the Del Sol String Quartet. At 8 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village, thestonenyc.com; $10. (Smith)

Talea Ensemble (Sunday) As part of the Roger Smith Hotel’s informal Inside Out series, this enterprising new-music band is presenting its cellist, Chris Gross, in a daunting program of unaccompanied works: Helmut Lachenmann’s “Pression” (1968), Milton Babbitt’s “More Melismata” (2006) and Bernd Alois Zimmermann’s Sonata for Cello Solo (1960). At 4 p.m., Roger Smith Hotel, 501 Lexington Avenue, at 47th Street, 16th floor, (212) 339-2092, taleaensemble.org or rogersmithlife.com; $15. (Kozinn)