Coming up in Portland

From Portland’s Creative Music Guild:

1939 Ensemble
Gregg Skloff
Revival Drum Shop
1465 NE Prescott
Wednesday, March 21, 8 pm
$5
All ages.

Performers:

1939 Ensemble ( (driving drums & vibes):
1939 Ensemble are an instrumental duo from Portland, OR. with an unusual line-up: drums, vibraphone & noise. Drawing influences from Krautrock, jazz & no wave, 1939 Ensemble moves between ominous dissonance noise to sharp bombastic beats. The duo features Jose Medeles (The Breeders) & David Coniglio. 1939 Ensemble have shared a stage with The Sea and Cake, Battles, AgesandAges, Rebecca Gates and many more. Jose is the owner of Revival Drum Shop and David is the head drum instructor at the Portland School of Rock.

Gregg Skloff (bass epiphany)
Challenging, strange, and always a pleasure to hear and see. Gregg and his bass are visiting from Astoria, come and hear a bass epiphany. Gregg Skloff has played contrabass since 1990. Since his move to the Pacific Northwest in 1997, Gregg has played in various improvisational settings with a multitude of musicians, including Gust Burns, Arrington de Dionyso, Tatsuya Nakatani, Matana Roberts, Bert Wilson, and many others. He has also devoted his efforts to several rock bands, including Counterfeit Monsters, Thunder!Thunder!Thunder! (a pre-Explode Into Colors project with Claudia Meza and Lisa Schonberg), and Captain’s Daughter. In 2009, ESP-Disk released the album Gigantomachia by The Naked Future (featuring de Dionyso, Skloff, pianist Thollem McDonas and drummer John Niekrasz) to international acclaim. Gregg has been a regular participant with the Creative Music Guild’s large ensembles (for guest artists such as John Gruntfest, Urs Leimgruber, and Bhob Rainey). Gregg’s work on his own, meanwhile, conjures a uniquely intense and enigmatic mood in the swirling storms and sweeping vistas of his solo instrumental performances.

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Jazz Listings From The New York Times

English: Peter Apfelbaum live at Saalfelden 20...
Image via Wikipedia

From NYTimes.com:

Karl Berger’s Improvisers Orchestra (Tuesday) Mr. Berger, the composer, conductor and former guiding spirit of the Creative Music Studio in Woodstock, N.Y., presides over this loosely defined large ensemble, made up of open-minded improvisers like the multi-reedist Peter Apfelbaum and the drummer Warren Smith. This performance kicks off a new series, on alternate Tuesdays through May 15, in which the musicians workshop ideas during a 7:30 p.m. open rehearsal, followed by a proper 9 p.m. performance. At Jazz Gallery, 290 Hudson Street, at Spring Street, South Village, (212) 242-1063, jazzgallery.org; $20 for workshop and performance ($15 for members and students) and $15 for performance only ($10 for members and students). (Chinen)

Kris Davis Quintet (Saturday) An inquisitive pianist with a willful but methodical approach to experimentation, Kris Davis has made herself indispensable on New York’s left-of-center jazz scene in recent years. In preparation for a new quintet recording, she leads a band with the violist Mat Maneri, the saxophonist Ingrid Laubrock, the bassist Eivind Opsvik and the drummer Tom Rainey. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, Greenwich Village, (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; $25 cover, includes one drink. (Chinen)

Henry Threadgill’s Zooid (Friday through Sunday) Mr. Threadgill, a penetrating saxophonist, flutist and composer, has long been a sly maestro of unconventional timbres, bristling counterpoint and tough but slippery rhythms. Zooid, his working band for more than a decade, features the guitarist Liberty Ellman, the tuba and trombone player Jose Davila, the acoustic bass guitarist Stomu Takeishi and the drummer Elliot Humberto Kavee; a cellist, Christopher Hoffman, was recently added to the roster, with welcome results. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Jazz Gallery, 290 Hudson Street, at Spring Street, South Village, (212) 242-1063, jazzgallery.org; $25 cover, $15 for members. (Chinen)

Classical Music Listings From The New York Times

Česky: Edgard Varèse English: Edgard Varèse
Image via Wikipedia

From NYTimes.com:

Alarm Will Sound (Sunday) Performing as part of American Mavericks, a series presented by the San Francisco Symphony and Carnegie Hall, this innovative chamber ensemble lays out a banquet of significant selections by John Cage. Completing the bill are a premiere by Charlie Wilmoth, a composition by Elliott Sharp and arrangements of works by Edgard Varèse and Conlon Nancarrow. At 3 p.m., Abrons Arts Center, 466 Grand Street, at Pitt Street, Lower East Side, (212) 598-0400, henrystreet.org; free. (Steve Smith)

Brentano String Quartet (Wednesday) This adventurous and excellent quartet presents the second part of “Fragments: Connecting Past and Present.” The program offers commissioned works by John Harbison, Stephen Hartke and Vijay Iyer, who have turned unfinished works or fragments by Haydn, Shostakovich and Mozart into new pieces. The original music will be performed to offer a comparison. At 7:30 p.m., Weill Recital Hall, Carnegie Hall, (212) 247-7800, carnegiehall.org; $65. (Tommasini)

Ecstatic Music Festival (Saturday) This festival has brought together like-minded musicians for collaborations that require some boundaries to be kicked over. At this installment the guitarist-composer Rhys Chatham shares a bill with Oneida, the genre-bending Brooklyn improvisatory ensemble. At 7:30 p.m., Merkin Concert Hall, 129 West 67th Street, Manhattan, (212) 501-3330, kaufman-center.org; $25 and $15 for students. (Kozinn)

Jennifer Koh (Sunday) As part of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and Carnegie Hall’s American Mavericks festival, this searching violinist — a maverick herself — will play works by John Adams, Missy Mazzoli and Lou Harrison, as well as a piece written expressly for her by Jennifer Higdon, in concert with the pianist Reiko Uchida. At 4 p.m., Brooklyn Public Library, Central Library, 10 Grand Army Plaza, at Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn, (718) 230-2100, carnegiehall.org; free. (Woolfe)

Los Angeles / SoCal Scene

Mark Dresser
Cover of Mark Dresser

From Beyond Baroque:

Friday, March 16, 9pm
Beyond Baroque presents a special evening of poetry and music, featuring Dottie Grossman (poetry) and Michael Vlatkovich (trombone), with special guest Rich West (drums, percussion). Beyond Baroque, 681 Venice Blvd., Venice | $7

From Angel City Arts:

Friday, March 16, 9pm
Angel City Arts and the blue whale present night two of the three-evening residency of Kneebody, featuring Adam Benjamin, Ben Wendel, Kaveh Rastegar, Nate Wood, and Shane Endsley. By combining sophisticated compositions and virtuosic improvising, the Grammy nominated group Kneebody has created a diverse, loyal fan base in the United States and Europe. Founded in 2001, Kneebody has built upon an impressive array of individual resumes and conservatory training to create a truly singular voice within the instrumental world. blue whale, Weller Court, 123 Astronaut E.S. Onizuka St. Ste. 301, downtown Los Angeles | General Admission: $15 / $25 (for 2 nights) $35 (for three nights).

From The Broad Stage:

Saturday, March 17, 7:30pm
Russian composer Alexander Scriabin caused a sensation in 1915, staging what was most likely the first multimedia concert in history. Designing a clavier à lumière to project colors onto the stage as it was played, this singular composer pioneered ideas relating colors and musical pitch. Now celebrated Georgian pianist Eteri Andjaparidze and MacArthur “genius” lighting designer Jennifer Tipton explore the legacy of this late Romantic composer through excerpts from his Poeme Languide in B Major and other works, including Feuillet d’Album in F-sharp Major, Opus Posthumous. A pre-concert lecture by Ryan Dudenbostel will be presented at 7:00 pm. The Broad Stage, Santa Monica College Performing Arts Center, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica | $75 / $60 / $47

From the wulf:

Saturday, March 17, 8pm
the wulf presents music by Laurence Crane, Tim Parkinson and James Saunders, in a concert of five works by three composers, curated by Christine Tavolacci. The performers will include Eric km Clark, Rory Cowal, Corey Fogel, April Guthrie, Cassia Streb, Christine Tavolacci, Brian Walsh, Tara Boyle, Matt Barbier and Orin Hildestad. the wulf, 1026 South Santa Fe Ave. #203, downtown Los Angeles | donations accepted

From Jacaranda:

Saturday, March 17, 8pm
A vaporous shot of dry ice across a raging inferno gives you a sense of the contrasts of this program, Chill Upon The Heat, presented by Jacaranda. Four highly inventive and utterly different American composers are convened here to make strange sense of the world. Featured on this program will be Christopher Rouse (String Qt. No. 2, No. 3), Leon Kirchner (Five Pieces for Piano), Richard Rodney Bennett (Six Tunes for the Instruction of Singing Birds), and William Schuman (In Sweet Music: Serenade on a setting of Shakespeare). Featured performers will be the Calder Quartet (Benjamin Jacobson, Andrew Bulbrook – violins, Jonathan Moerchel – viola, Eric Byers – cello), Maria Casale (harp), Victoria Miskolczy (viola), Steven Vanhauwaert (piano), Pamela Vliek Martchev (flute), and Suzanne Waters (soprano). First Pres of Santa Monica, 1220 Second St., Santa Monica | $35 general / $15 student

From Sundays Live:

Saturday, March 17, 8:30pm
Now into its second decade of celebrating the beauty that lies “between the keys” of the piano, MicroFest 2012 is the world’s leading concert series devoted to the glorious universe of non-standard tunings. Founded by microtonal guitarist and radio personality JOHN SCHNEIDER in 1997, MicroFest has grown to a festival of eight separate events this year at various venues around Southern California. This evening’s concert will feature Wolfgang von Schweinitz‘s Raga, an exquisite gossamer web of harmonics and finely tuned harmonies for violin and bass, performed by Andrew McIntosh (violin) and Scott Worthington (contrabass). Boston Court Performing Arts Center, 70 North Mentor Ave., Pasadena |$25 advance / $30 door

From Angel City Arts:

Saturday, March 17, 9pm
Angel City Arts and the blue whale present night three of the three-evening residency of Kneebody, featuring Adam Benjamin, Ben Wendel, Kaveh Rastegar, Nate Wood, and Shane Endsley. By combining sophisticated compositions and virtuosic improvising, the Grammy nominated group Kneebody has created a diverse, loyal fan base in the United States and Europe. Founded in 2001, Kneebody has built upon an impressive array of individual resumes and conservatory training to create a truly singular voice within the instrumental world. blue whale, Weller Court, 123 Astronaut E.S. Onizuka St. Ste. 301, downtown Los Angeles | General Admission: $15 / $25 (for 2 nights) $35 (for three nights).

From Sundays Live:

Sunday, March 18, 3pm
The Epicenter Music Performance Organization TEMPO presents the CSUN Faculty New Music Ensemble, performing pieces by Daniel Kessner, Roshanne Etezady, Hee Yun Kim, Joanna Bruzdowicz, and Joseph Eidson. The performing artists include David Shostac (flute), Julia Heinen (clarinet), Nancy Roth (violin), Matt Cooker (cello), Aaron Smith (percussion), Francoise Regnat and Dolly Eugenio Kessner (piano), and Daniel Kessner (conductor). Cal State University Northridge, Cypress Hall (Music Building), Recital Hall, 18111 Nordoff St., Northridge | $10 general / $7 faculty, staff, seniors / $5 students

From Jacaranda:

Sunday, March 18, 6pm
A vaporous shot of dry ice across a raging inferno gives you a sense of the contrasts of this program, Chill Upon The Heat, presented by Jacaranda. Four highly inventive and utterly different American composers are convened here to make strange sense of the world. Featured on this program will be Christopher Rouse (String Qt. No. 2, No. 3), Leon Kirchner (Five Pieces for Piano), Richard Rodney Bennett (Six Tunes for the Instruction of Singing Birds), and William Schuman (In Sweet Music: Serenade on a setting of Shakespeare). Featured performers will be the Calder Quartet (Benjamin Jacobson, Andrew Bulbrook – violins, Jonathan Moerchel – viola, Eric Byers – cello), Maria Casale (harp), Victoria Miskolczy (viola), Steven Vanhauwaert (piano), Pamela Vliek Martchev (flute), and Suzanne Waters (soprano). First Pres of Santa Monica, 1220 Second St., Santa Monica | $35 general / $15 student

From Sundays Live:

Sunday, March 18, 7:30pm
Resound! Concert Series presents Cheri Cole (trumpet) and friends, as they perform Terry Riley (In C) and other selections from the 20th and 21st centuries. This performance will have approximately 30 players, consisting of strings, woodwinds, brass, electric instruments, and percussion. Bethel Congregational Church, 536 North Euclid, Ontario | Free

Sunday, March 18, 8pm
Chapman University Faculty Recital series presents Kritina Driskill (soprano), performing a program of modern music, including pieces by Dominick Argento (The Diary of Virginia Woolf), Gary Schocker (Diary of an Urban Maiden), and Alva Henderson (various songs). Chapman University, Salmon Recital Hall, One University Drive, Orange | $10 general / $5 students and seniors

From CalArts:

Monday, March 19, 2pm
The Herb Alpert School of Music at CalArts presents Visiting Artist, bassist Mark Dresser, as part of the Performer-Composer Forum. California Institute of the Arts, 24700 McBean Pkwy., Rm. A300, Valencia | Free

From FaceBook:

Thursday, March 22, 7pm
Rubix invites you to the debut of Culture + Music + Art + Talk, with hors d’oeurves, beer, wine and a special “rubix-tini”. Join LA-based photographer Dana Ross as he interviews prominent artists and musicians as they share their thoughts on the creative process. This evening’s featured artists include John Van Hamersveld (graphic design innovator and icon), Timur & the Dime Museum (avant-garde cabaret act performance), and Shana Nys Dambrot (well-known and respected art critic, curator and author). Rubix Hollywood, 1714 North McCadden Place, Hollywood | RSVP to rsvp (at) shinyobjectco.com

An Interview With Andrew Cyrille

Andrew Cyrille
Andrew Cyrille (Photo credit: shawn brackbill)

From Washington City Paper:

Andrew Cyrille is one of the most prominent drummers in the world of avant-garde jazz—and one of the first few to establish his own sound in the genre. Studying with Max Roach, Philly Joe Jones, and Babatunde Olatunji as a kid in Brooklyn, Cyrille really made his reputation working with Cecil Taylor for 11 years, from the ’60s to the mid ’70s. He’s also a formidable composer in his own right, and will perform his work tonight at Atlas Performing Arts Center with a large ensemble of local musicians (billed as “21st Century Big Band Unlimited”), in arrangements of friend and collaborator Mark Masters.