Newsbits

Henry Threadgill

Two new releases from Kairos are reviewed.

Gyan Riley, son of Terry, is profiled.

Fotofono has a bunch of new live recordings up.

Do The Math features a three-part interview with Henry Threadgill.

Proving that there is an app for everything, experimental musician Gwilym Gold has released a single as an app tat changes every time you listen to it.

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The Squid's Ear Reviews

Jean Derome performing with Jandek, Loren Robe...
Image via Wikipedia

From The Squid’s Ear:

Matta Gawa – Ba (Engine)
Jean Derome & Joane Hetu – Shaman – Nouse percons les oriles (Ambiances Magnetiques)
Planeta Imaginario – Optical Delusions (Cuneiform)
The Lou Grassi Po Band with Marshall Allen – Live at the Knitting Factory, Volume 1 (Porter Records)
En (Pal Toth) / Quentin Rollet / Zsolt Sores – Paw Music (Hermes Discorbie)
Tim Berne – Insomnia (Clean Feed)

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Classical Music Listings From The New York Times

From NYTimes.com:

Composers Concordance (Tuesday) This enterprising new-music organization presents the ensemble Circadia, a woodwind, string and piano quintet, in a program that includes works by Derek Bermel, Louis Calabro, Dan Cooper, Joseph Pehrson and Gene Pritsker. The program, called “Generations,” will also include works by the winners of two Composers Concordance competitions: one for a composer 20 or under, the other for a composer 70 or over. At 8 p.m., Performing Center of St. Sava Cathedral, 20 West 26th Street, Manhattan , (646) 522-9442, sequenza21.com/calendar/2011/05/composers-concordance-presents-generations/; $15; $10 for students and 65+. (Kozinn)

Da Capo Chamber Players (Thursday) This group, an essential and exciting contemporary music ensemble, celebrates its 40th anniversary in a program with new pieces by George Tsontakis and Keith Fitch; works by Joan Tower; and a Da Capo specialty, Schoenberg’s “Pierrot Lunaire,” with the soprano Lucy Shelton as soloist. At 8 p.m., Merkin Concert Hall, 129 West 67th Street, Manhattan , (212) 501-3330, kaufman-center.org; $20; $10 students and seniors. (Anthony Tommasini)

Either/Or (Thursday) Opening its sixth annual spring festival, this restlessly inquisitive new-music group mixes three works by longtime New York trailblazers — Steve Reich’s “Four Organs,” Robert Ashley’s “Outcome Inevitable,” George Lewis’s “Signifying Riffs: Unison” — with premieres from two gifted rising composers: Richard Carrick (a director of Either/Or) and Andrew Byrne. (A second concert on June 3 focuses primarily on European mavericks.) At 8 p.m., the Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, Chelsea , (212) 255-5793, Ext. 11, thekitchen.org; $12. (Smith)

International Contemporary Ensemble (Tuesday) ICELab, this exciting ensemble’s residency at Le Poisson Rouge, has a typically adventurous program on Tuesday night. And it’s free. The composer Nathan Davis has written a cycle of new works that are scored for small combinations of instruments that, using minute microphones, will produce an “architecture of color, texture, rhythm and breath,” the promoters promise. Le Poisson Rouge continues to be an invitingly informal place to hear all kinds of contemporary music. At 7:30 p.m., Le Poisson Rouge, 158 Bleecker Street, near Thompson Street, Greenwich Village , (212) 505-3474, lepoissonrouge.com. (Tommasini)

Locrian Chamber Players (Thursday) The mission of this new-music group is to perform works that are no more than 10 years old — which means pieces that were new during its first six seasons (the ensemble was formed in 1995) are now off limits. Its program this time includes John Adams’s String Quartet, Eleanor Cory’s “Conversations,” Robert Cohen’s “Midnight Girl” and Reiko Füting’s “Kaddish: The Art of Losing.” At 8 p.m., Riverside Church, 490 Riverside Drive at 122nd Street, Morningside Heights , (914) 923-5511, locrian.org; free. (Kozinn)

The Stone (Friday, Saturday, Tuesday through Thursday) All aesthetics are fair game at John Zorn’s austere East Village music laboratory. But with two vital new-music record labels, Innova and New World, handling the current programs, there’s much to interest contemporary-classical partisans. Key picks include sets by the composer Neil Rolnick (Friday); the Glass Farm Ensemble (Saturday); Zeitgeist and the Prism Quartet (Tuesday); the composer Eve Beglarian (Wednesday); and the pianist Geoffrey Burleson (Thursday). Friday, Saturday and Wednesday at 8 p.m., Tuesday at 8 and 10 p.m. and Thursday at 10 p.m., the Stone, Avenue C and Second Street, East Village , thestonenyc.com; $10 per set. (Smith)

Tribeca New Music Festival (Tuesday) This burgeoning festival heads to Brooklyn for “Tribeca Monsters,” a concert featuring the violinist Mary Rowell (of Ethel renown) and her regular concert partner, the pianist Geoffrey Burleson. The duo will be joined by further guests in music composed by Stewart Copeland (the Police drummer), Jacob ter Veldhuis, Michael Gandolfi, Marc Mellits and others — including Dylan Mattingly, the winner of the festival’s young composers’ competition this year. At 8 p.m., Galapagos, 16 Main Street, at Water Street, Dumbo, Brooklyn , (718) 222-8500, galapagosartspace.com; $15; students $10. (Smith)

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Jazz Listings From The New York Times

From NYTimes.com:

Michaël Attias and Twines of Colesion (Friday) As he does on his most recent album, “Twines of Colesion” (Clean Feed), Mr. Attias, an adventurous alto saxophonist, calls on the adaptive abilities of some sharp collaborators: the tenor saxophonist Tony Malaby, the pianist Russ Lossing, the bassist John Hébert and the drummer Satoshi Takeishi. At 9 and 10:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village , (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; $15 cover, with a $10 minimum. (Chinen)

DMG 20th-Anniversary Celebration (Sunday) The Downtown Music Gallery, a soulfully run record shop specializing in avant-garde jazz and experimental music, marks a milestone with three compatible sets: at 9 p.m. the saxophonist Louie Belogenis digs in with the bassist Shanir Blumenkranz and the drummer Michael Wimberley; at 10 the drummer Weasel Walter does the same with the trumpeter Peter Evans and the programmer Sam Pluta. The finale, from 11:15 on, comes courtesy of Burnt Sugar, a combustible big band. Bowery Poetry Club, 308 Bowery, near Bleecker Street, East Village , (212) 614-0505, bowerypoetry.com; $15. (Chinen)

Mary Halvorson Quintet (Monday) The guitarist Mary Halvorson has often held the jazz tradition at arm’s length, but with her most recent album, “Saturn Sings” (Firehouse 12), she augments her devilishly supple trio with a sure-footed frontline of trumpet (Jonathan Finlayson) and alto saxophone (Jon Irabagon). The same personnel reassembles here, previewing material from a forthcoming album. At 9:30 p.m., Joe’s Pub, at the Public Theater, 425 Lafayette Street, at Astor Place, East Village , (212) 967-7555, joespub.com; $12 in advance, $15 at the door. (Chinen)

Sifter (Wednesday) A smart-looking new collective trio, consisting of acutely responsive fellow searchers: Kirk Knuffke on cornet, Mary Halvorson on guitar and Matt Wilson on drums. At 8:30 p.m., Cornelia Street Café, 29 Cornelia Street, West Village , (212) 989-9319, corneliastreetcafe.com; $10 cover. (Chinen)

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