The Stone in November

Henry Grimes
Cover of Henry Grimes

Highlights from next month at New York’s Stone:

November 2010 at the Stone
curated by Henry and Margaret Grimes

MONDAY NOVEMBER 1—STONE SEMINAR 44
JEFF “TAIN” WATTS
7PM to 9PM—TWENTY DOLLARS: Open to All
Along with explosive power, blinding speed and mastery of complex rhythms and time signatures, Jeff “Tain” Watts brings a rare sense of elegance, tried-by-fire composure, and a gritty street funk to his music. His artistic ingenuity expresses itself in his incomparable technique, sweltering sense of swing, and extraordinary ability to imbue his music with majestic grace and elegant repose. A true jazz innovator, Watts never fails to deliver the percussive magic that has been his trademark since his emergence on the contemporary jazz scene. http://www.chambersoftain.com.

11/3 Wednesday (MP)
8 and 10 pm
Henry Grimes’ 75th Birthday
Henry Grimes (acoustic bass, violin, poetry) Edward “Kidd” Jordan
Henry Grimes has played more than 400 concerts in 24 countries, including many festivals, since 2003, when he made an astonishing return to the music world after 35 years away. He studied at Juilliard and in his youth played/toured/recorded with Albert Ayler, Don Cherry, Benny Goodman, Coleman Hawkins, Roy Haynes, Steve Lacy, Charles Mingus, Gerry Mulligan, Sonny Rollins, Pharoah Sanders, Archie Shepp, Cecil Taylor, McCoy Tyner… In recent years he’s played/toured/recorded with Rashied Ali, Marshall Allen, Fred Anderson, Marilyn Crispell, Andrew Cyrille, Bill Dixon, Dave Douglas, Paul Dunmall, Edward “Kidd” Jordan and Roscoe Mitchell, David Murray, William Parker, Marc Ribot, Cecil Taylor, and many more. Because Henry is an elder but still playing in completely new ways, he represents a bridge from the past to the future, embodying invention, inspiration, vision, and courage. Happy birthday, Henry! http://www.henrygrimes.com.

Edward “Kidd” Jordan has always remained faithful to the sounds in his soul. The honesty in his playing is matched only by a tone rarely heard in the history of the tenor saxophone. He has played with Muhal Richard Abrams, Fred Anderson, Ed Blackwell, Ray Charles, Ornette Coleman, Hamid Drake, Alvin Fielder, Aretha Franklin, Joel Futterman, Henry Grimes, Julius Hemphill, David Murray, William Parker, Sun Ra, Archie Shepp, the Supremes, Cecil Taylor, Stevie Wonder, and far too many other great musicians to list here. He has taught for 3O years at Southern University in New Orleans, as well as at the Heritage School of Music, in Mali, Senegal, and Sierra Leone, and in many other places. He has been knighted by the French government for his artistic contributions. Henry Grimes is honored to be able to share his 75th birthday sets with Edward “Kidd” Jordan. http://www.allaboutjazz.com/kiddjordan.

In celebration of Henry’s 75th birthday, we can’t have food or drinks at the Stone, but after the two sets of music, musicians and ticket-holders may convene at a late-night area restaurant to be announced (Dutch treat!).

TWENTY DOLLARS

11/4 Thursday (MJJ)
8 and 10 pm
G. Calvin Weston Group, tribute to Ornette Coleman and Free Jazz
G. Calvin Weston (drums, keyboards, trumpet) Ed Ricart (guitar) Tom Spiker (bass) Billy Martin (percussion, drums)
G. Calvin Weston came up in North Philadelphia, where he saw musicians such as Stevie Wonder, The Jackson Five, and James Brown at the Uptown Theater. Seeing his attention focused on the drummers, his father bought him a small set. In high school Calvin learned to read music and played second snare in the drum ensemble. He co-founded the group Bad Influence, which played in cabarets and clubs around Philadelphia. At 17, Calvin joined Ornette Colemans Prime Time Band with bass player Jamaaladeen Tacuma and Charlie Ellerbee, touring extensively in North America and Europe. Calvin went on to play and record with guitarist James “Blood” Ulmer, then joined John Lurie’s Lounge Lizards in 1990. During the late ‘90s Calvin recorded and toured with Billy Martin of Medeski Martin and Wood, Tricky, Eyvind Kang, Derek Bailey, Marc Ribot, and James Carter. He also played on several movie soundtracks, including “Get Shorty.” And he continues to lead his own groups. http://www.myspace.com/calvinweston. TWENTY DOLLARS

11/7 Sunday (KR)
8 pm
Mark Dresser and Henry Grimes
Mark Dresser (bass, electronics) Henry Grimes (bass, violin)
Mark Dresser has performed and recorded with some of the strongest personalities in contemporary music, including Ray Anderson, Tim Berne, Jane Ira Bloom, Bobby Bradford, Tom Cora, Marilyn Crispell, Anthony Davis, Dave Douglas, Fred Frith, Diamanda Galas, Vinny Golia, Earl Howard, Oliver Lake, George Lewis, Misha Mengelberg, Ikue Mori, James Newton, Evan Parker, Sonny Simmons, Louis Sclavis, Vladimir Tarasov, Henry Threadgill, and John Zorn. Mark has taught at the Juilliard School, Princeton University, New England Conservatory, National Superior Conservatory of Paris, Conservatory of Amsterdam, and many more. He has been a faculty member at the New School University, Hampshire College, and Princeton University, and is now on the faculty of the University of California at San Diego. http://www.mark-dresser.com, http://www.henrygrimes.com. TWENTY DOLLARS.

10 pm
Matana Roberts
Matana Roberts (alto saxophone) Ches Smith (drums)
Matana Roberts and Ches Smith are two of New York’s finest improvisers. Tonight they will be experimenting on spontaneous city soundscapes. http://www.matanaroberts.com. http://www.chessmith.com

MONDAY NOVEMBER 8—STONE SEMINAR 45
MARK DRESSER—Bass Explorations
7PM to 10PM—TWENTY DOLLARS
Bass Explorations, Investigations, and Explanations: a workshop for bassists and composers towards understanding and applying extended techniques in improvisation and composition. Bassists, bring your instruments.

11/9 Tuesday
8 pm
Edwin Torres with Henry Grimes
Edwin Torres (poetry) Ernesto Gomez (harmonica) Henry Grimes (double-bass, violin)
Edwin Torres grew up in the Bronx and, since his poetic birth at The Nuyorican Poet’s Café in the early 90’s, has been performing and conducting workshops across the US and overseas. As a bilingual poet rooted in the languages of both sight and sound, his intermingling between vocal/sound and identity/experimental defy poetic category. He has been featured in “Newsweek,” “Rolling Stone” Magazine, and “New York” Magazine and has performed at many many venues. His newest book, “Yes Thing No Thing” is a psychophysical explosion of page in the act of becoming stage. http://www.brainlingo.com

10 pm
Ismail Lawal
Ismail Lawal (drums)
Ismail Lawal’s “DHx5,” original compositions by the drummer. Driven by a relentless curiosity, Ismail Lawal’s playing happily avoids easy categorization. Lawal fell in love with jazz as a teen, specifically the intellectual and cultural inquisitiveness which he saw as feeding the vitality of the music. Adopting an inclusive stance, Lawal has gone on to perform in a variety of musical settings, from various African-based traditions to singer-songwriter projects, and myriad worlds in between. http://www.myspace.com/evilunltd

11/10 Wednesday
10 pm
Carmen Staaf and Henry Grimes
Carmen Staaf (piano, accordion) Henry Grimes (bass, violin)
Winner of the 2009 Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Pianist Competition, Carmen Staaf has performed throughout the United States, as well as at numerous festivals and other venues in Europe, Latin America and India; she has worked with jazz luminaries including Henry Grimes, Eddie Gomez, Bob Brookmeyer, Rakalam Bob Moses, and George Garzone. Her 2008 album “Reflection” has been called “profoundly beautiful” and features her original jazz compositions with currents of swing, Cuban music and free improvisation. She joined the piano faculty at Berklee College of Music at age 24 and taught there for four years. http://www.carmenstaaf.com. TWENTY DOLLARS

11/11 Thursday (JS)
8 and 10 pm
Tyshawn Sorey
Tyshawn Sorey (drums)
Tyshawn Sorey is from Newark and is an active composer, performer, educator, and scholar who works across an extensive range of musical idioms. As percussionist, trombonist, and pianist, Tyshawn has performed and/ or recorded nationally and internationally with his own ensembles and with those led by Muhal Richard Abrams, Steve Coleman, Lawrence D. “Butch” Morris, Michele Rosewoman, Vijay Iyer, Wadada Leo Smith, Dave Douglas, and Billy Bang, among many others. His recent music has focused on concepts derived from the music of Morton Feldman and Zen Buddhism; using these models for interpreting determinate music that act as principal generators for the discovery of ideas. His article in “Arcana 4” (John Zorn, ed.) entitled “Music and Meaning” examines his approach to both composition and improvisation. He is presently studying for his Master’s degree with Anthony Braxton at Wesleyan University. http://www.myspace.com/tyshawnsorey

11/12 Friday (YT)
10 pm
Henry Grimes’s Sublime Communication Trio
Henry Grimes (bass, violin) Andrew Lamb (reeds, flutes, woodwinds, perc) Newman Taylor Baker (drums, perc)
This trio of ecstatic sound has played 15 concerts between New York City and the Azores (two of them festivals), was the surprise smash hit at Edgefest (Ann Arbor, Michigan) a couple of years ago, was named “Best Jazz Trio of the Year” by “New York Press,” and has produced two CDs thus far. http://www.henrygrimes.com, http://www.myspace.com/andrewtheblacklamb. http://www.ntbsingindrums.blogspot.com. TWENTY DOLLARS

11/13 Saturday (MJ)
8 and 10 pm
Marc Medwin
Marc Medwin (piano) Henry Grimes (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (drums)
Marc Medwin received his Ph.D. in 2008 from the University of North Carolina and teaches music history full time at American University in Washington, D.C. Increasingly active in the fields of performance and journalism, he writes liner notes, CD reviews, and articles for various print and online journals, and he also plays keyboards with local “free jazz” and electro-acoustic ensembles. He lives with his wife and 5-year-old daughter in Gaithersburg, Maryland. http://www.american.edu/cas/faculty/medwin.cfm. TWENTY DOLLARS

MONDAY NOVEMBER 15—STONE SEMINAR 46
HENRY GRIMES (double-bass, violin, poetry)
7PM to 9PM—TWENTY DOLLARS: Open to All
A conversation in music and words about playing music to save the world. Bring your instruments.

11/16 Tuesday (JS)
8 pm
Salim Washington with Melanie Dyer and Henry Grimes
Salim Washington (saxophones) Melanie Dyer (viola) Henry Grimes (bass, violin)
Melanie Dyer: The Denver public school system put a viola in my hands in 4th grade ‘cuz it was the only instrument left in the band room. Few months later a symphony violist moves in across the street. Synchronicity. Playing/performed w/Kuumbaa Frank Lacy’s Vibe Tribe, Salim Washington’s Harlem Art Ensemble & Roxbury Blues Aesthetic, Many Colors of a Woman, Joe Bonner, Jabbo Ware, Jimmy Hopps, Ken McIntyre, Joe Ford & Jerry Eastman… matriculated on the bandstand at Connolly’s Stardust Lounge/Boston, orchestras & opera companies. Two sides: “Love in Exile” & “Harlem Homecoming.” 4 kids, a mortgage & a day job. You gotta have peace and love. http://www.myspace.com/melaniedenisedyer

10 pm
Salim Washington
Salim Washington (saxes) Juini Booth (bass) Tyshawn Sorey (drums)
A native of Memphis, Salim Washington grew up in Detroit. In his teens he mastered the saxophone, the flute, and the oboe, and studied piano as well. He attended Harvard for a while, taking time off to further his career as a jazz musician, composer, and arranger. He founded a Boston-based group, the Roxbury Blues Aesthetic, played with a number of ensembles, and traveled extensively, playing at music festivals in Canada, Latin America, and Europe. Since moving his base of operations to New York, he has become a regular at St. Nick’s Pub in the Sugar Hill section of Harlem on Friday nights, frequently appearing as leader of his latest group, Harlem Arts Ensemble. In the latter half of the ‘90s, he went back to Harvard to complete his B.A. and go on for his Ph.D., receiving his doctorate in 2000. He is now a professor at Brooklyn College and a recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship. http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/pub/1671.htm

11/17 Wednesday (CL)
8 and 10 pm
Jeff “Tain” Watts with Henry Grimes and Scott Robinson
Jeff “Tain” Watts (drums) Henry Grimes (bass, violin) Scott Robinson (reeds)
Along with explosive power, blinding speed and mastery of complex rhythms and time signatures, Jeff “Tain” Watts brings a rare sense of elegance, tried-by-fire composure, and a gritty street funk to his music. His artistic ingenuity expresses itself in his incomparable technique, sweltering sense of swing, and extraordinary ability to imbue his music with majestic grace and elegant repose. A true jazz innovator, Watts never fails to deliver the percussive magic that has been his trademark since his emergence on the contemporary jazz scene. http://www.chambersoftain.com TWENTY DOLLARS.

11/20 Saturday (RK)
8 and 10 pm
STONE IMPROV NIGHT—A Stone Benefit
Many special guests!
Come down and help The Stone stay afloat with out monthly improv concerts! TWENTY DOLLARS.

11/21 Sunday (KR)
8 pm
Connie Crothers and Henry Grimes
Connie Crothers (piano) Henry Grimes (bass, violin)
Fifteen Dollars.

10 pm
Connie Crothers
Connie Crothers (piano) Richard Tabnik (alto saxophone) Roy Campbell, Jr. (trumpets) Ken Filiano (bass) Roger Mancuso (drums)
After attending the University of California at Berkeley, Connie Crothers moved to New York in 1962 to study with Lennie Tristano, who presented her in solo and quartet concerts at Carnegie Recital Hall. She began long-term artistic collaborations with Warne Marsh, Lenny Popkin, and Max Roach, touring Europe and Canada and appearing at the Blue Note, Sweet Basil, Birdland, the Spoleto Festival, and the Village Vanguard. With Jemeel Moondoc, Connie performed at the Vision Festival, Tonic, and Hallwalls in Buffalo, and at the Stone with the addition of Henry Grimes. Connie currently performs with her own quartet, featuring alto saxophonist Richard Tabnik, drummer Roger Mancuso, and bassist Ken Filiano. Roulette presented her duo with electro-acoustic improviser and composer Ben Manley, as well as in duo with Kevin Norton. She appeared at Brecht Forum with her newly formed trio, TranceFormations, with singer Andrea Wolper and Ken Filiano, and in duo at The Stone with clarinetist Bill Payne. Marian McPartland featured Connie on her NPR radio series Piano Jazz. http://www.conniecrothers.net.

MONDAY NOVEMBER 22—STONE SEMINAR 47
Connie Crothers—Spontaneous Improvisation
7PM to 9PM—TWENTY DOLLARS: Open to All
Lecture/Q&A. The subject will be spontaneous improvisation, with the emphasis on intuition as the source for musical content. I’ll talk about this with reference to both free improvisation and standard tunes (not the “changes” and pre-arranged melodic bits approach to standards–an approach that opens up standards to a more freely improvised music). I will refer to musical examples, both current and important turning points from the past (perhaps beginning with Louis Armstrong’s “free” improvisatory introduction to “West End Blues.”

11/23 Tuesday (CL)
8 pm
Marc Ribot Solo
Marc Ribot (guitars, voice)
The boundless musician, composer, bandleader, writer, speaker, and activist Marc Ribot was born in Newark and as a teen played guitar in garage bands while studying with Haitian classical guitarist and composer Frantz Casseus. Marc has since played /toured/recorded with (to name just a few) Laurie Anderson, Chuck Berry, Solomon Burke, T-Bone Burnett, Vinicius Cantuaria, James Carter, Elvis Costello, Marianne Faithfull, Chocolate Genius, Allen Ginsberg, Henry Grimes, Joe Henry, the Jazz Passengers, Arto Lindsay, the Lounge Lizards, Evan and John Lurie, Cibo Mato, Brother Jack McDuff, Medeski Martin & Wood, Marisa Monte, Sam Phillips, Wilson Pickett, Realtones, Patti Scialfa, David Sylvian, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Carla and Rufus Thomas, Alan Toussaint, McCoy Tyner, Caetano Veloso, Tom Waits, Akiko Yano, and John Zorn. He frequently collaborates with producer T-Bone Burnett, most recently on Alison Krauss and Robert Plant’s Grammy-winning “Raising Sand.” Marc also leads several groups of his own, including Los Cubanos Postizos, the Marc Ribot Trio, Rootless Cosmopolitans, Shrek, Spiritual Unity, Sunship, and more. He has both scored and played on scores of many films and documentaries. http://www.marcribot.com.

10 pm
Marc Ribot Trio
Marc Ribot (guitars, voice) Henry Grimes (bass, violin) Chad Taylor (drums)
The boundless musician, composer, bandleader, writer, speaker, and activist Marc Ribot was born in Newark and as a teen played guitar in garage bands while studying with Haitian classical guitarist and composer Frantz Casseus. Marc has since played/toured/recorded with (to name just a few) Laurie Anderson, Chuck Berry, Solomon Burke, T-Bone Burnett, Vinicius Cantuaria, James Carter, Elvis Costello, Marianne Faithfull, Chocolate Genius, Allen Ginsberg, Henry Grimes, Joe Henry, the Jazz Passengers, Arto Lindsay, the Lounge Lizards, Evan and John Lurie, Cibo Mato, Brother Jack McDuff, Medeski Martin & Wood, Marisa Monte, Sam Phillips, Wilson Pickett, Realtones, Patti Scialfa, David Sylvian, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Carla and Rufus Thomas, Alan Toussaint, McCoy Tyner, Caetano Veloso, Tom Waits, Akiko Yano, and John Zorn. He frequently collaborates with producer T-Bone Burnett, most recently on Alison Krauss and Robert Plant’s Grammy-winning “Raising Sand.” Marc also leads several groups of his own, including Los Cubanos Postizos, the Marc Ribot Trio, Rootless Cosmopolitans, Shrek, Spiritual Unity, Sunship, and more. He has both scored and played on scores of many films and documentaries. http://www.marcribot.com. FIFTEEN DOLLARS

11/27 Saturday
8 and 10 pm
Andrew Lamb and The Moving Form
Andrew Lamb (reeds, flutes, woodwinds, perc) Tom Abbs (bass, tuba, perc) Warren Smith and Michael Wimberly (drums, perc) Will Halsey (spoken word, perc) Jimmy James Greene (spontaneous visual art, flute)
Andrew Lamb, born in North Carolina and raised there and in Chicago, came to New York in the ‘70s and soon became an active presence in the vibrant Bedford-Stuyvesant arts scene, eventually winning a grant from the Brooklyn Arts Council. Andrew and his ensembles have been a regular presence in the New York area ever since, and have frequently played the annual Vision Festival. In 2001, Andrew Lamb took part in Alan Silva’s big-band project the Sound Visions Orchestra, and the following year he toured with AACM-affiliated drummer Alvin Fielder. Andrew has also played 20 concerts, including several festivals, in the U.S. and Europe with Henry Grimes since 2004 in Henry’s groups Spaceship on the Highway and the Sublime Communication Trio. Andrew Lamb can be heard on the Delmark, CIMP, Engine, Danjor, and JazzNewYork Productions labels. http://www.myspace.com/andrewtheblacklamb. FIFTEEN DOLLARS

11/28 Sunday (AC)
8 and 10 pm
Odean Pope
Odean Pope (saxophones) Henry Grimes (bass and violin) Craig McIver (drums)
Odean Pope was born in Ninety-Six, South Carolina to musical parents who rooted him in the sounds of the Southern Baptist Church. After moving to Philadelphia at the age of ten, his lifelong study of music began in earnest at The Graniff School of Music and Benjamin Franklin High School’s music program; later he studied at The Paris Conservatory for Music under Kenny Clarke. Odean also studied with Ray Bryant, Jymie Merritt, and Max Roach. In 1979, Odean joined the Max Roach Quartet as a regular member for more than two decades, and there he perfected the techniques of circular breathing and multiphonics that allow him to stretch his solo improvisations from dazzling elevations to the throbbing, husky sounds for which he is so well known, to all kinds of delicacy in getting from one to the other. Odean now leads a trio, quartet, and a saxophone choir (9 saxophones), a medium for creating the richly textured harmonic sound that has permeated his musical soul since childhood. His artistry as performer, composer, arranger, and teacher have earned him many citations from the City of Philadelphia. Among his many awards are the Pew Fellowship in the Arts for Music Composition (1992), The Rockefeller Foundation (1992) and several from Chamber Music America. http://www.odeanpope.com. TWENTY DOLLARS

MONDAY NOVEMBER 29—STONE SEMINAR 48
Harriet Tubman Trio Workshop—Brandon Ross (guitars) Melvin Gibbs (bass guitar) J.T. Lewis (drums)
7PM to 9PM—TWENTY DOLLARS: Open to All

The Harriet Tubman Trio was formed in 1998, named after the heroic African-American slave who risked her life to escape from slavery, and helped more than 3OO others to do the same. Deeply inspired by the ideals of freedom, the Harriet Tubman Trio’s music plumbs the soul’s depths for liberated musical expression, continuing the process of contextual and musical innovation exhibited by such diverse artists as Ornette Coleman, Jimi Hendrix, Derrick May, the Art Ensemble of Chicago, and Parliament Funkadelic, creating innovative compositional and cultural spaces, an important part of the African-American cultural tradition. http://www.myspace.com/melvin1brandon1jt1

(DS)

11/30 Tuesday (YT)
8 and 10 pm
Zim Ngqawana
Zim Ngqawana (saxophones, flute) Henry Grimes (bass, violin) Andrew Cyrille (drums)
Zim Ngqawana was born in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, and first made his mark at the historic inauguration of President Nelson Mandela in 1994, where he directed the 1OO-member Drums for Peace Orchestra, led an elite group of 12 presidential drummers, and was featured as solo saxophonist. This recognition came after a late start and some tough struggles. Zim was the youngest of five children and started playing flute at the age of 21; although he was forced to drop out of school before completing university entrance requirements, his prowess won him a place at Rhodes University. He later went on to study for a diploma in Jazz Studies at the University of Natal. Working with the University’s ensemble, he attended the International Association of Jazz Educators convention in the U.S. and was offered scholarships to the Max Roach/Wynton Marsalis jazz workshop and subsequently a Max Roach scholarship to the University of Massachusetts, where he studied with jazz legends Archie Shepp and Yusef Lateef. Since his return to South Africa in the ‘9Os, he has worked in the bands of veteran greats Abdullah Ibrahim and Hugh Masekela and has also devoted much time and effort into building up a number of his own small and large groups. Zim is committed to developing and creating an audience for new South African jazz. His music draws on influences ranging from South Africa’s folk and rural traditions to Indian and Western classical music, world music, and the avant-garde. He is open to everything and in search of spirituality. He refuses to limit his music to being specifically South African. He doesn’t play jazz; he plays music. He isn’t African; he’s universal. http://www.myspace.com/zimology. TWENTY DOLLARS

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Iannis Xenakis’ Persepolis in L.A.

xenakis footage from videotheque
Image by dodeckahedron via Flickr

From LA’s Museum of Contemporary Art:

In conjunction with the exhibition Iannis Xenakis: Composer, Architect, Visionary at MOCA Pacific Design Center November 6, 2010, through February 4, 2011, the first recreation of Xenakis’s legendary Polytope de Persepolis will be performed at Los Angeles State Historic Park. Adapted by German sound artist and Xenakis electronic music expert, Daniel Teige, Persepolis L.A. will involve six listening stations with eight speakers each. This performance will encompass more than 70,000 square feet of performance area within the 32-acre park.

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