Musique Machine Reviews

Masami Akita at Moers Festival 2007
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From Musique Machine:

The Skull Defekts – The Temple
The Temple sees The Skull Defekts refocusing their droning, hypnotic, often weighty and noisy sound into more muscular and tribal rhythmic noise rock form that’s laced with occultic undertones and dense creative flare; with a liberal use of vocals and a high dependence on doomed metallic meets punked riff matter.

Mathias Delplanque – L’Inondation
Music for installations is not seldomly more experience rather than music. Listened with full attention it might appear a bit dull, but as an ambiance—a mood—it can work quite well.

Merzbow – Eucalypse
Eucalypse sees Merzbow weaving in a more atmospheric and at times melodic guitar lines and noise textures into his dense noise sound. All to make an album that feels like mixture of the noise cinematics of 07’s Coma Berenices & the emotionally singed guitar and noise scapeing of 06’s Minazo Vol 1

Brethren of The free Spirit – The Wolf Also Shall Dwell With The Lamb
Brethren of The free Spirit are the duo of guitarist/composer James Blackshaw and lutenist/composer Jozef van Wissem.The Wolf Also Shall Dwell With The Lamb is the projects second album of sublime, earthy and beautiful collection of folk/ classical stringed tracks that are both hypnotic in the repetition and atmospheric and melodic in there flow.

Death InJune – Live in Italy 1999 plus(Dvd)
Live in Italy 1999 plus is an highly enjoyable, wonderful performed and filmed hour long concert recorded at the Tpo in Bologna on the 29th of May 1999. The concert takes in the electronic, sampled and big percussive sound of Death in June, as well as the tight yet melodic neo- folk acoustic side of the project too.

Noism – ±
When it comes to ‘extreme music‘, the Japanese seem to have cornered the market for years. The emancipation of noisemaking has made it possible to make noise an international sport, but still there’s plenty of intense stuff coming from under the rising sun.

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Bjork and Dirty Projectors – Musical Ambitions Overflow

An odd pairing is reivewed:

The music was quiet: just voices and modestly amplified acoustic instruments. But the songs were hugely complex and ambitious, announcing their destination in the lyrics: “on and on and ever onward.”

Bjork was collaborating on a suite of six very new songs with Dirty Projectors, the New York City band led by David Longstreth. They had been brought together by Brandon Stosuy, from the music blog, who supervised a Bjork tribute album and found they admired each other. No wonder: they could be musical cousins, although their songs head in different directions. Mr. Longstreth’s leaping, suddenly swelling vocal lines clearly show Bjork’s influence. And his music’s blend of classical and progressive-rock intricacy, pointillistic backup singing and West African picking patterns rightly appeals to the equally eclectic Bjork.

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Positive Catastrophe mixes highbrow with high energy at Jazz Gallery

A recent Positive Catastrophe show is reviewed.

After stopping by the TONY office last week for a live duo performance, cornetist Taylor Ho Bynum and conga player Abraham Gomez-Delgado brought their eclectic, well-oiled ten-piece ensemble, Positive Catastrophe, to Jazz Gallery on Friday. The early set had a loose vibe, heavy on the loopy between-tune banter and ad-libbed arrangements—it was an excellent showcase for the band’s singular blend of the festive and the avant-garde.

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