ESP New Releases

New release from ESP:

VARIOUS ARTISTS, “MOVEMENT SOUL VOLUME II” esp4034

A continuation from the earlier Alan Ribback work, produced by Michael D. Anderson. The CD examines untapped and historically important achievements and tragedies in the lives of a people during the Civil Rights era.

This compilation presents facts on events in black history that merit their being acknowledged. Other forth coming volumes will present further historical developments that will remain an important part of American history seen and unseen. Each CD will examine different aspects of the Civil Rights Movement featuring interview footage, press releases, and music heard during the time of each theme.

The production of this CD is to encourage people of all races the do more study involving the Civil Rights era and other thematic topics that also address stages of development during this era. It is hoped that people of all races will better understand the on-going struggle of African Americans and the many achievements towards the development of this country which dispel the negative connotations passed down through families for generations.

NORMAN HOWARD, “BURN BABY BURN” esp4033

Despite the profound obscurity of Norman Howard’s music, and that of his mate Joe Phillips, it’s crucial as a window not only into the influence that Albert Ayler carried in creative music, but into how the Aylers affected the musicians of their hometown. Most importantly, this reflects on how vital free music has been at the local level, where it remains so to this day. – Clifford Allen

DON CHERRY, “LIVE AT THE CAFE MONTMARTRE” esp4032

Don Cherry, more than any other artist in the jazz of his era, pioneered the music’s internationalist nature that has now come to be commonly accepted as an integral part of its character. The individuality of Cherry’s contribution to the history of jazz has often been unfairly obscured by his admittedly important association with the music of Ornette Coleman. While the (pocket) trumpeter’s position as Coleman’s front line partner in the altoist’s first revolutionary quartet was indeed a major one, Cherry’s role as one of the founders of the genre that is known today as “world music” is equally significant. – Russ Musto