Upcoming Alabama Shows


English: Trevor Dunn live at Saalfelden 2009 I...

Image via Wikipedia

From Tuscaloosa’s Creative Campus:

Harris Eisenstadt and his critically acclaimed quintet Canada Day will lead off Sonic Frontiers, a cutting-edge avant-garde jazz series on The University of Alabama campus. The first concert will be at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 27, 2012 at UA’s Ferguson Center Theater. The concert is free and open to the public. The Sonic Frontiers series is designed to further artistic diversity on the UA campus, says series organizer Dr. Andrew Raffo Dewar, assistant professor in New College and the School of Music. The concerts will foster creative exchange among between music professionals, UA students, faculty and staff, and the greater community through performances and class visits by world-class performers of avant-garde jazz.

Subsequent concerts and events:

Wednesday, March 21: Saxophonist Jack Wright, the “Johnny Appleseed of free improvisation,” will visit a New College seminar and perform a community-outreach solo concert in a venue to be determined. For details, to go http://soundcloud.com/jackwright

Friday, April 6: Bassist and composer Trevor Dunn‘s Endangered Blood quartet from New York will perform at 7:30 p.m. in the Ferguson Center Theater. Dunn is known for his work with the rock band Mr. Bungle, but Endangered Blood is his avant-jazz project featuring internationally acclaimed musicians Jim Black on drums and Chris Speed and Oscar Noriega on saxophone. Endangered Blood on YouTube

Monday, April 23: A public screening of eminent ethnomusicologist Steven Feld’s 2009 documentary film about Ghanaian musician, inventor and visual artist Nii Noi Nortey, “Accra Trane Station: The Music and Art of Nii Noi Nortey,” will be at 5:30 p.m. in 132 Lloyd Hall.

Wednesday, April 25: Nii Noi Nortey, the acclaimed saxophonist and saxophone inventor from Accra, Ghana, will offer a two-day residency involving a concert of solos, duos and trios with Dewar and renowned Japanese-American percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani at 7:30pm on April 25th at the Ferguson Center Theater. Nortey’s visit includes four class visits at UA on April 25 and 26 in the School of Music and New College.

Bargemusic, With the Pianists Olga Vinokur and David Kalhous


From NYTimes.com:

The composer Morton Feldman wrote vast works of whisper-soft chords and eerie harmonies that unfold with glacial, regal slowness. Encouraged by John Cage, Feldman — who had a day job working in his family’s coat-manufacturing business until he was 44 — created music that used neither tonal nor serial techniques.

AMN Picks of the Week: Noomena / Vander / Method of Defiance / Anduin / Braxton


Anthony Braxton 1976

Image via Wikipedia

Here is where I post, at a frequency of about once a week, a list of the new music that has caught my attention that week. All of the releases listed below I’ve heard for the first time this week and come recommended.

Nooumena – In Memory of a Next World (2006)
Christian Vander – John Coltrane l’Homme Suprême (2011)
Method of Defiance – Incunabula (2011)
Anduin – Stolen Years (2012)
Anthony Braxton – Quartet (Avignon) 1974
Anthony Braxton – Quartet (Paris) 1969
Anthony Braxton – Solo (Ghent) 1969 to 1971

Charles Wuorinen’s Works at the Guggenheim Museum


Charles Wuorinen, 1990's

Image via Wikipedia

From NYTimes.com:

Mr. Wuorinen, known for his complex, 12-tone music, has denounced populist trends in classical music. But along with his modernist colleagues Pierre Boulez and Elliott Carter, Mr. Wuorinen seems to have mellowed in recent years, writing more accessible pieces like this whimsical cantata for four singers and chamber ensemble. It was commissioned for the Tanglewood Festival of Contemporary Music in Lenox, Mass., and received its premiere there last August.