New Release from Atavistic


Recently out on Atavistic Worldwide:

Chicago-based sound artist J.R. Robinson has been creating live, ambient tonefields in museums around the US and Europe over the past two years-including the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the Pompidou Center in Paris, and The Art Center Berlin.

Robinson has injected these recordings into collaborations with some like-minded heavy hitters from the noise, post-rock and jazz worlds such as David Yow (Jesus Lizard/Scratch Acid), Mark Shippy & Pat Samson (US Maple), Azita Youssefi, John Herndon & Jeff Parker (Tortoise), Keefe Jackson, Fred Lonberg-Holm and Ken Vandermark. The result (dubbed Wrekmeister Harmonies), is a distinctive hybrid of sound art and avant-garde musics, evoking the essences & influences of masterworks like Joe McPhee‘s Nation Time, Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music and the sound collages of Stockhausen.

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The Squid’s Ear Reviews


The latest reviews from the Squid’s Ear:

Kullhammar / Osgood / Vagan – Andratx Live
Evan Parker – Saxophone Solos
Molly Berg & Stephen Vitiello – The Gorilla Variations
Dan Warburton – Profession Reporter
Indigo Trio – Anaya
Agusti Fernandez – Un Llamp Que no S’acaba Mai

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Sonomu Reviews


From Sonomu:

Apalusa, Obadiah (Low Point)
Obadiah was the prophet who wrote the shortest book to make it into the Old Testament – in fact, it can hardly be called a “book”, really barely a handful of words thrown at a single folio page. It is a nasty rant about a tribe (who shall remain nameless) which betrayed the ancient Israelites… [read]
Posted by Stephen Fruitman at 06:48, 18 Jun 2009

Fredrik Klingvall, Works of Woe (CD Last Entertainment)
Works of Woe is based on the works of Poe, as this is the last in a trilogy. Its suitably drear artwork by Peter Wallebo on a full-size, gatefold digipak contains within but twenty-two minutes and twenty-two seconds of music. But then, again brevity is often the hallmark of good poetry. … [read]
Posted by Stephen Fruitman at 07:52, 22 May 2009