Archive for September, 2006

Dusted Reviews

Posted: September 30, 2006 by Mike in Reviews

Dusted recently posted a bunch of new reviews.

Artist: The Dirty Projectors
Album: New Attitude
Label: Marriage

Artist: Wolf Eyes
Album: Human Animal
Label: Sub Pop

Artist: DJ Shadow
Album: The Outsider
Label: Island

Artist: The Necks
Album: Chemist
Label: ReR Megacorp

Artist: Nels Cline
Album: New Monastery: A View Into the Music of Andrew Hill
Label: Cryptogramophone

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Bagatellen Reviews

Posted: September 30, 2006 by Mike in Reviews

The latest from Bagatellen.

Brian Allen w/ Tony Malaby and Tom Rainey – Synapse – 29 Sep 06
Sun Ra – Concert for Comet Kohoutek – 26 Sep 06

At the Roulette in November

Posted: September 30, 2006 by Mike in Performances

Upcoming shows at New York’s Roulette:

For immediate release
ROULETTE presents
20 Greene St (between Canal and Grand St)
8:30 PM Admission $15 Students $10 MEMBERS FREE
TICKETS/RSVP: 212.219.8242
Roulette 228 West Broadway New York, NY 10013
contact: press@roulette.org http://www.roulette.org/

ROULETTE IS THRILLED TO ANNOUNCE OUR MOVE INTO OUR NEW HOME: 20 GREENE
STREET in SOHO. With this new space, Roulette will be expanding activities
to include over 100 concerts, sound installations, longer runs of music
theater and other large productions such as the ³Avant Jazz ­ Still Moving²
festival and the annual ³Festival of Mixology.² For our expanded events
calendar go to: http://www.roulette.org/

Also! Please check out our new ROULETTE BLOG for excerpts of our artists¹
music, podcasts featuring interviews with the artists and Roulette TV clips,
and musical discussion: http://www.roulette.org/blog/index.php

Thursday, November 2nd
*Kato Hideki*
Tremolo of Joy
Tremolo of Joy is a hybrid band drawing together elements of the old & new.
The music is shaped around the imaginative melodies of bassist/composer Kato
Hideki. The group builds on this foundation with tools like canon (delay),
counterpoint (reverse), human loops and live electronics. The result
combines chamber music syntax with the rhythmic excitement of rock ‘n¹ roll.
With Marco Cappelli (electric guitar,) Briggan Krauss (reeds) & Calvin
Weston (drums.)

Friday, November 3rd
*Phoebe Legere*
Sisters and Brothers
Brother Africa and Sister America meet a Fine While Man
Phoebe Legere¹s new band, Sisters and Brothers, takes ancient chants and
then goes way outside, incorporating West African shamanic drumming and many
exotic percussion instruments from Africa and Native America with invented
instruments and classic French Canadian instruments. Tonight, they present
an evening-length piece in which Phoebe and Joakim perform environmentally,
combining marching, dance and trance music with video projections of
paintings and animation, texts and gesturesÅ  With Scott Hornick (bass,)
Joakim (percussion, drums & samples) & Phoebe Legere (piano, accordion,
spoons, native flute, buffalo drum, sneakers & visuals.)

Saturday, November 4th
*Shoko Nagai*
Ephemeral
New York based composer/pianist Shoko Nagai’s project, Ephemeral, explores
the essence of Japanese traditional music. The work ties together Gagaku
(the oldest classical music in Japan) and the sound of Nohgaku (abstract
theater) with elements of contemporary western music, experimental
electronic music and improvisation. Her composition makes use of multiple
textures and an open sense of time to evoke another realm of time and place.
Nagai will be joined in this performance by Ned Rothenberg (shakuhachi,
clarinet, bass clarinet,) Jennifer Choi (violin,) John Lindberg (bass) and
Satoshi Takeishi (percussion, electronics.)

Sunday, November 5th
*Guy De Bièvre*
Very Slow Disco Suite
The Very Slow Disco Suite researches extreme time stretching of popular
music formats, allowing the performers to explore the music in both
horizontal and vertical realms. The V.S.D.S. sounds disco depths: musicians
play against a synthesized backdrop, each using a microcontroller that both
conducts the processing of their sonic output and, based on the sound
happening in the room, indicates which part of the score to perform. De
Bièvre is a Brussels-based composer, musician, sound designer and curator.
His work focuses on experiments that combine computers, live electronics,
acoustics and standard arrangement formats. With Peter Zummo (trombone,)
J.D. Parran (reeds) & De Bièvre (guitar & lap steel.)

Friday, November 10th
Saturday, November 11th
Sunday, November 12th
*ROULETTE & DIXON PLACE present*
**WARNING: NOT FOR BROADWAY**
Dixon Place’s popular annual festival of new musical theater and opera
works, curated by Michelle Feldman, presents first showings that re-think
compositional and theatrical structure, overturn dramaturgical convention,
defy gender/race/sexual classifications, expand the possibilities of
audience involvement, and generally redefine the musical theater genre. Each
year, over a dozen creators are selected to bring their newest, riskiest
material to the supportive, nurturing atmosphere of this downtown
festival…

Monday, November 13th
*Allan Jaffe, Earl Howard & Gerry Hemingway*
Allan Jaffe will join forces with electronic composer/saxophonist Earl
Howard and drummer Gerry Hemingway to present a concert of original
compositions and improvisations. The evening will feature a collaboration
making use of Howard¹s pioneering, interactive electronic processing
techniques on the acoustic guitar and drums, combining these instruments¹
natural sounds with his own imaginative aural perceptions. Also on the
program will be a solo guitar piece, as well as several acoustic duets and
trios.

Thursday, November 16th
*Carla Kihlstedt*
Carla Kihlstedt plays songs for violin and voice: songs of her own writing,
songs written by friends (among them, Lisa Bielawa and Jorge Liderman) and
perhaps songs written by enemies…atonal songs, one-chord songs, tuneful
songs and toneless songs. Kihlstedt is a multifaceted & unpredictable new
talent, using her violin, voice & movement simultaneously. She is active
both as a composer and a violinist and is a founding member of the Tin Hat
Trio of the art-rock band, Sleepytime Gorilla Museum. With strong roots in
classical music and the technical prowess to prove it, Kihlstedt¹s
performances offer a stunning interplay of sound and staging.

Friday, November 17th
*Lisle Ellis*
Audible Means
Lisle Ellis¹s new ensemble, Audible Means, sets the extensive pallet of
sounds Ellis draws out of his custom bass, computer software and electronic
hardware. Tonight Ellis presents Audible Means in trio formation with Ellery
Eskelin (saxophone) and Erik Deutsch (keyboards.) The group will interpret
Ellis¹s original compositions that reference, skewer and abstract a variety
of genres. Rhythmic impetus and an accumulation of pulsating mood swings
reveals music that is simultaneously improvisational, detailed and rigorous.
³Truly remarkable in its beauty, intensity, and energy² (One Final Note,)
Ellis¹s work involves interests in music, visual art, computers/technology
and community.

Friday, November 18th
*Dafna Naphtali*
fusebox//
For 10 years, Dafna Naphtali has been finding ways to peacefully and
not-so-peacefully incorporate ³audio machinations² (her particular vision
for sound processing and manipulation) into both improvised and composed
music, using an arsenal of digital equipment & self-made computer programs
that compliment her 4-octave vocals. fusebox// is a continuation of
Naphtali¹s longstanding experimentation with sound processing and
improvisation, which she now explores through novel
arrangements/configurations of jazz favorites (Mingus and others) and
original compositions. With saxophonist Ras Moshe, Shayna Dulberger (bass)
and drummer/percussion TBA.

Sunday, November 19th
*Mike Skinner*
Mike Skinner¹s 8 Track Attacks use portable 8 track players from the 60s and
70s (with custom cassettes and found tapes,) quadrophonic 8 track systems,
tape loops, short wave radio, bowed percussion, space echo, electric and
effected cello (with cellist/composer Gretta Cohn) and effected vocal loops
to create dense landscapes of sound. Skinner is a composer, producer and
writer working with a wide cross section of New York’s art stars, indie
rockers, noise bands, art filmmakers, fashion designers, video artists,
transsexuals and choreographers. His work has appeared at the Venice
Biennale, PS1, Alona Kagan and Diapason Gallery. Tonight¹s performance is
commissioned by Roulette with support from the Jerome Foundation.

Thursday, November 30th
*Noa Guy*
Drops of Consciousness ­ part one
Using her still photography and pre-recorded string quartet as a point of
departure, composer/performer Noa Guy collaborates with friends in a journey
exploring the edges of audio-visual information processing. This performance
examines the emotional reaction to an image of sound and silence, of light
and darkness, of being and not being. Guy¹s award-winning works include
pieces for solo voice to symphonic orchestra as well as multimedia work and
music for film and the theatre. With Alon Leventon (sound artist,) Kim
Spiegler and Lio Spiegler (film artists.)

Steve Reich Writes

Posted: September 30, 2006 by Mike in General

Reich reviews some predictions he made about the future of classical music in 1970.

Thirty-six years ago, I had the nerve to write a short essay entitled “Some Optimistic Predictions about the Future of Music”. I would not write such an essay today. We really know very little about what is going on right under our nose – forget the future.


This review focuses on Coleman’s supposedly unconventional sounds.

Part of the legend of saxophonist Ornette Coleman, as with many other great innovators, has to do with early rejection and ridicule.

There’s the story of one of his first employers, rhythm ‘n’ blues bandleader Pee Wee Crayton, paying him to not take solos. Of the beboppers in Los Angeles in the early 1950s telling Coleman he didn’t know the chord changes, was out of tune, couldn’t play. Of audience members in his native Forth Worth seizing his saxophone and smashing it or, according to an alternate story, throwing it in a river.

DMG Newsletter September 29th 2006

Posted: September 30, 2006 by Mike in Releases, Reviews

This week’s DMG Newsletter has the latest news and reviews.

THE FALL ROLLS IN with NEW DISCS from MARK FELDMAN/JOHN TAYLOR/ANDERS JORMIN/TOM RAINEY, BILL FRISELL/RON CARTER/PAUL MOTIAN, GARY LUCAS’ GODS & MONSTERS, HILMAR JENSSON’S TYFT w/ JIM BLACK/ANDREW D’ANGELO,

JOE FONDA/RAMON LOPEZ/BRUNO ANGELINI, THE JD PARRAN SEXTET, EDDIE PREVOST/ALAN WILKINSON DUO & TRIO, JEFF ARNAL & GORDON BEEFERMAN, TWO CDs w/ GEORGE CARTWRIGHT, JORDAN McLEAN’S FIRE OF SPACE, ESTRADASPHERE,

FIVE MORE CIMP CLASSICS: DOMINIC DUVAL STRING QUARTET, TOMAS ULRICH & MICHAEL BISIO STRING DUO, MATT MARUCCI/DOUG WEBB/KEN FILIANO TRIO, SETH MEICHT QUARTET, JIMMY HALPERIN & DOMINIC DUVAL MONK DUO,

ANTHONY BROWN’S ORCHESTRA, GYORGY LIGETI, LONDON SINFONIETTA THE WONDERFUL WERGO CATALOGUE, SIX MORE FROM THE ROOM-40 LABEL: SAMARTZIS/INADA, RICHARD CHARTIER, GREG DAVIS & JEPH JERMAN , LLOYD BARRETT, JANEK SCHAEFER & SAMARTZIS/ENGLISH,

EMPTY CAGE QUARTET, RUST IONICS [ED CHANG/ADAM KRINEY/DOUG THERIAULT], THE JAPANESE INDEPENDENT MUSIC BOOK & CD, 3 from FALLOUT: PAT KILROY, ALAN TRAJAN & JAN & LORRAINE!

….AND A ‘WERGO’ LABEL RESTOCKING!!!

More ReR Releases

Posted: September 29, 2006 by Mike in Releases

Our earlier post missed these two ReR releases, that have come out along with the Henry Cow box and the new Hail.

PICCHIO DAL POZZO “abbiamo tutti i suoi problemi”
Amongst the cognoscenti, Picchio dal Pozzo are regarded as one of the most original, impressive and highly respected of all the experimental groups to have come out of Italy in the 1970s. They share their original label with Henry Cow’s ëConcerts’, also reissued this month, and were early invitees to the canonical ëRecommended Sampler’. This has, for years, been difficult to come by, only being previously issued as an expensive product from Japan. But now this classic is domestically available, and it too sounds great due to Bob Drake’s re-mastering skills.

IZ “E M”
“E M” is the 3rd CD from IZ, and is a densely layered and skillfully presented instrumental CD on the heavy side of rock, with elements of experimental music. Generally the songs writing is in a minimalist and sparse style that is in contrast to the thick tambor, meter changes and harmonic complexities. This approach makes every note/chord an essential statement and creates a unique sonic quality rarely heard in groups with rock instrumentation.